Lo-tech crashes hi-tech political campaign tactics

Political Theater, Episode 147

A D.C. voter uses a mail-in-ballot drop box at the Northeast Neighborhood Library in Washington on Oct. 5. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)
A D.C. voter uses a mail-in-ballot drop box at the Northeast Neighborhood Library in Washington on Oct. 5. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)
Jason Dick
Posted October 15, 2020 at 1:11pm

Technology increasingly defines modern life, and that is especially so in political campaigns. But for all the sophisticated polling models and ways of raising money in politics, a new organization is betting that a very old-school way of doing things will help boost turnout.

Vote Tripling was founded after the 2016 election by Robert Reynolds, a behavioral scientist. He wants to boost Democratic turnout. And he thinks it might be as easy as getting people to text their friends.

CQ Roll Call senior political writer Bridget Bowman has reported on the group and its efforts, and we to talk to her and listen to her conversation with Reynolds about Vote Tripling, how it’s going and how it might affect some key races in the battle for the Senate and House.

Show Notes: