Politics

Trump on Kavanaugh: ‘I Am With Him All The Way’

President stands by pick despite second accusation of sexual misconduct

President Donald Trump defended his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh while speaking to reporters at a meeting on the global drug problem at the United Nations on Monday. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Monday said he is sticking with Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, telling reporters “I am with him all the way.”

“There’s a chance that this could be one of the single most unfair, unjust things to happen to a candidate for anything,” the president said on the sidelines of a United Nations conference in New York hours after another accuser came forward alleging sexual misconduct by Kavanaugh.

Kavanaugh’s first accuser is slated to testify before the Senaet Judiciary Committee on Thursday morning, followed by the nominee.

Trump and Senate Republicans are lashing out at the second accusation, saying it is not credible. They are eager to get Kavanaugh on the high court to give it a 5-4 conservative edge.

Trump signaled he wants the Judiciary Committee to vote on the nomination soon.

“I look forward to a vote. And for people to come out of the woodwork from 36 years ago and 30 years ago, and never mention it, and all of a sudden it happens, in my opinion, is totally political,” he said.

“It’s totally political,” Trump said again, this time gesturing with his hand raised and index finger pointing toward the cameras. He then turned and left the room, ignoring other questions about the embattled nomination.

As Washington and the country await Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony, a second woman made allegations in The New Yorker of sexual misdeeds by Kavanaugh while they were freshmen at Yale University. She claims the federal judge exposed his penis and she inadvertently touched it while pushing him away; she also admits to being severely intoxicated at the time.

The White House on Sunday evening fired back at that report, citing a New York Times — despite the president often calling the newspaper “fake news” — account of why it opted against running the second accuser’s story when approached.

“The Times had interviewed several dozen people over the past week in an attempt to corroborate her story, and could find no one with firsthand knowledge,” the newspaper said in a Sunday article.

Watch: Can Trump Resist Lighting the Fuse Ahead of Kavanaugh's Senate Showdown?

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