Politics

Senate Schedules 10 p.m. Vote on CR; House Asked to be Flexible

From left, Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., are staring at a government shutdown threat. ( Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As negotiations between Democrats and Republicans to avert a govenent shutdown continue, the Senate will vote at 10 p.m. on the House-passed bill to extend funding for four weeks, and members of the House have been asked to be available. 

Shortly after Senate leaders set up the late-night vote, the office of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise released a statement to members regarding further votes: “Please remain in town and flexible and we will relay any additional information as soon as it becomes available.... We aim to provide ample notice (approximately one hour) prior to any potential additional votes.”

Rand Paul’s Neighbor to Plead Guilty in Assault Case
Court documents highlight dispute about brush

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., allegedly was assaulted while he was mowing his lawn by a neighbor. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The neighbor of Sen. Rand Paul who allegedly assaulted the Kentucky Republican while he was mowing his lawn has now signed a federal plea agreement.

The U.S. Attorney in Indianapolis made the announcement Friday. His office was assigned the case following the recusal by the U.S. Attorney in the western part of Kentucky.

Photos of the Week: Butterfly Protesters, A Gold Medal for Dole and More as Shutdown Cloud Hangs Over D.C.
The week of Jan. 16 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., is shown on a television monitor questioning Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen during the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Thursday passed a continuing resolution to fund the government past midnight on Friday, but the bill has yet to pass the Senate. The shutdown showdown cloud has loomed over Washington this entire week, but life also went on inside the halls of Congress.

Here’s the entire week in photos:

Shutdown Effects Would Hit Agencies Differently
Some departments will have more employees at work than others

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney said Friday that a shutdown might not be as painful as in 2013. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Federal departments and agencies were gearing up for the possibility that a shutdown would actually take place, with Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney putting the odds at about 50-50 Friday morning.

The effects across the government would vary from agency to agency, in part because they have different levels of available funding and transfer authority, but Mulvaney said a partial shutdown starting Saturday would in some ways not resemble the one in 2013.

Justice Department Wants to Re-Try Mendendez
Comes after corruption trial last year ended in mistrial

New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez was charged with taking bribes from a political donor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Justice Department said it plans to re-try Sen. Robert Menendez after his trial on corruption charges last year ended in mistrial.

Menendez was accused of accepting bribes from political donor Salomon Melgen. Judge William H. Walls declared a mistrial after individually interviewing members of the jury after it deadlocked.

No Deal After Trump-Schumer Meeting to Avoid Shutdown
‘The discussions will continue,’ minority leader says

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An impending government shutdown continued to loom following a meeting between President Donald Trump and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer at the White House Friday afternoon.

Schumer made a brief statement to reporters outside the Capitol upon his return.

There Are Just Hours Left Before a Government Shutdown. This Is Totally Normal.
Since the last government shutdown, last-minute spending bills are standard operating procedure

Lawmakers are making a habit of getting right to the edge of government shutdowns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

On the day that government funding is set to expire, confusion has gripped the Capitol as the House-passed continuing resolution faces long odds in the Senate. If lawmakers pull out a fix to keep the lights on past midnight, it will most certainly be with only hours remaining before a deadline.

This is completely normal.

Schumer Meets Trump at White House to Attempt Shutdown Dodge
Minority leader floats 3-day CR, official says

Schumer. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer left the Capitol for 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Friday afternoon with a chance to broker a government shutdown-averting deal with President Donald Trump — and without Republican lawmakers in the room.

Schumer told Roll Call he hoped he could reach a deal with his outer-borough New York counterpart in the White House and keep the government operating past midnight Friday, when the current continuing resolution expires.

House Votes to Table Trump Impeachment
66 Democrats opposed tabling

A motion by Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, to impeach President Donald Trump was tabled. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Members of both parties in the House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly Friday to table articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

The final vote was 355 in favor of a motion by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy to table the articles of impeachment against the president. Only 66 Democrats voted against the motion.

Capitol a Land of Confusion as Shutdown Approaches
House members not even sure if they are free to go home

A worker pushes a Senate subway car Friday morning as the Senate considers the House passed continuing resolution to fund the government on January 19, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A sense of general confusion gripped the Capitol on Friday as the Senate argued over the way forward on avoiding a government shutdown and House members were unclear about whether they were supposed to go home or not. 

“I just don’t think they are in a position to tell us anything right now,” Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., said, adding that there haven’t been any instructions from GOP leaders about whether members can leave following votes. 

F-Bombs and C-Word Prompted Cotton Cease and Desist Letters
Recipients of letters argue they can use coarse language if they want

The office of Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., sent a number of cease and desist letters after a slew of calls from constituents using coarse language. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Incessant phone calls and abusive language prompted Sen. Tom Cotton’s office to mail cease and desist letters to members of the liberal activist group Ozark Indivisible, in October.

One of those constituents, Stacey Lane of Fayetteville, Arkansas, told ArkansasOnline that she received the ultimatum after “an f-bomb or two” during phone conversations with Cotton staffers.

Federal Complaint Filed Against Former Takai Campaign Treasurer
Nearly 18 months after congressman's death, campaign treasurer still making almost $6,000 a month

The family of the late Rep. Mark Takai, D-Hawaii, said it supports the efforts of campaign treasurer Dylan Beesley, who is accused of misusing Takai’s campaign funds. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A Washington, D.C., campaign finance watchdog group has lodged a complaint with the Federal Elections Commission against the campaign treasurer of former Rep. Mark Takai.

In a 13-page complaint paper, the Campaign Legal Center alleged that Dylan Beesley “illegally converted the late Congressman’s leftover campaign funds to personal use.”

Women’s March Will Go On, Shutdown or Not
National Park Service has a contingency plan if it comes to that

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington during the Women's March on Washington the day after Inauguration Day last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 2018 Women’s March in Washington will move forward as planned on Saturday despite a looming government shutdown.

An estimated 5,500 marchers will gather at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool at 11 a.m. for a series of speeches before winding their way east down Constitution Avenue and north to the White House gates to advocate for women’s inclusion in the political process.

On Shutdowns, Trump Once Thought ‘Pressure is on the President’
But on Thursday, he said ‘it’s up to the Democrats’

President-elect Donald J. Trump greets then-President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in on Inauguration Day last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Not too long ago Donald Trump made clear who he thought always should be blamed when the government shuts down: the sitting president of the United States. 

On Thursday, when asked who should be blamed if the government is shuttered at the end of the day Friday, Trump responded: “It’s up to the Democrats” to join Republicans and vote for a House GOP-crafted stopgap spending bill that would avert a federal shutdown.

Two of Three Democrats in Arizona Special Election Face Lawsuit
Both are running for the seat vacated by Trent Franks

Two Democrats running to replace former Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz., are having their petition signatures challenged. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawsuits were filed against two Democrats running in Arizona’s 8th District’s special election on Thursday challenging the number of signatures on their petitions to get on the ballot.

Brianna Westbrook and Gene Scharer are both running in the special election to replace Rep. Trent Franks, who resigned last month after reports he offered a staffer money to carry his child.