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New York Republican Rep. Chris Collins surrendered to the FBI on Wednesday over criminal insider trading charges.

A review of the three-term congressman’s financial disclosures shows the extent of his personal wealth. Collins ranked 13th among House and Senate colleagues in the most recent Roll Call Wealth of Congress index, a ranking of reported assets and liabilities. 

Those disclosures reveal a few other key takeaways of Collins’ financial history:

Collins was arrested for securities fraud related to Innate Immunotherapeutics, a drug company for which he is listed as a director. According to House financial disclosures, he also held leadership positions for numerous other companies, including ZeptoMetrix Corporation, an infectious disease diagnostics company. Until Wednesday, when he was stripped from his position on the Energy and Commerce Committee by Speaker Paul D. Ryan, he was on that panel’s Health Subcommittee, which oversees biomedical research and development and the regulation of food and drugs.

Collins’ son and future in-laws were also implicated in the Security and Exchange Commission’s insider trading complaint. The congressman has other family ties in his finances, too. In his financial disclosures, he noted that his spouse, Mary Collins, received a salary from ZeptoMetrix Corporation and Volland Electric Equipment, an electrical repair shop. His asset ownership in both companies rose from more than $10,000,000 in 2016 to $30,000,000 in 2017.

The SEC complaint against Collins does not relate to his own sale of the Innate Immunotherapeutics stock in 2017, but he has actively made transactions in the company over his three terms in Congress. House period transaction reports show Collins bought more than 4 million shares of Innate in 2016 at a minimum value of $1,000,000 and also bought unknown numbers of shares ranging from $1,000,000 in 2015 to $2,200,000 in 2013. His only documented sale related to Innate Immunotherapeutics was in 2018, when he sold stock for a minimum value of $15,000.

In the latest campaign financial disclosures from the Federal Election Commission, Collins spent more than $250,000 in “legal services” to Baker Hostetler, the law firm defending him in the Innate matter. While he paid for the firm’s services during the 2014 election cycle, those payments were worth no more than $2,600. Collins became the subject of a House Ethics Committee investigation in October for insider trading.

Watch: Collins’ Challenger: We Raised More This Morning Than ‘In the Whole Race’

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August might be a sleepy time for legislation, the Senate’s capital busy-work period notwithstanding. But this is a midterm election year, and we are still in the thick of primary season.

This Saturday, Hawaiians go to the polls to sort out their general election candidates, and come Tuesday, there’s another batch of primaries in Wisconsin, Vermont, Minnesota and Connecticut. 

The following week on Aug. 21, Alaskans and Wyomingites host their primaries. 

And the Sunbelt rounds out the month with primary elections in Florida and Arizona on Aug. 28. The Grand Canyon State features a marquee battle for the GOP Senate nomination between Rep. Martha McSally, former state Sen. Kelli Ward and former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, the latter of whom got all kinds of positive press after being punked by Sacha Baron Cohen on the satirical “Who is America?” show. 

But wait, there’s more! Primary season isn’t over until September, when Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire and Rhode Island get in on the action. 

Roll Call has the full calendar on its 2018 From Start to Finish section. 

There have been 11 special elections for the U.S. Congress since last year, and they all have one thing in common: Democrats have performed better than the partisan breakdown would suggest. Senior political writer Simone Pathé and elections analyst Nathan L. Gonzales joined us to discuss this phenomenon. From a heavily Democratic California district seeing even more Democrats vote for their party to a comfortably Republican Ohio district becoming a swing one, each special election bore that out.  

This week was as solid a recess as one may get this August, at least in the Senate. The House is away until after Labor Day, but senators, not without some grumbling, will be spending more of August here in Washington. That all has ripple effects, including deferred maintenance and increased staffing costs for taxpayers. Roll Call’s own Katherine Tully McManus outlined it all: What the Recess Rollback Means for Capitol Hill (and Taxpayers)

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Minnesota Democrat Keith Ellison has denied that he was abusive to an ex-girlfriend. The accusations surfaced just days a primary vote on Tuesday that will decide whether he becomes his party's pick to run for state attorney general.

Ellison confirmed that he’d had a long-term relationship with Minneapolis resident Karen Monahan in a statement on Sunday, while denying the accusations. 

Her 25-year-old son, Aslim Monahan, wrote on Facebook on Saturday that he’d clicked on a file while was trying to download something on his mother’s computer in 2017 and “found  over 100 text and twitters messages and video almost 2 min long that showed Keith Ellison dragging my mama off the bed by her feet, screaming and calling her a “f---ing bitch” and telling her to get the f--- out of his house.”

Aslim Monahan wrote that his mother said nothing happened “until I told her I saw a video and hell of a lot of messages saying something different.” 

Ellison issued this statement on Sunday:

“Karen and I were in a long-term relationship which ended in 2016, and I still care deeply for her well-being. This video does not exist because I never behaved in this way, and any characterization otherwise is false.” 

Several hours after her son’s Facebook post,  Karen Monahan also weighed in on social media.

“That was my son who posted and its true,” she tweeted. “He wouldn’t lie about his own mom.”

Ellison, an outspoken critic of President Donald Trump,  is a  six-term congressman and  serves as vice chairman of the Democratic National Committee. He reportedly decided to run for Minnesota attorney general in part to be in a good position to oppose the president’s policies. 

Also Watch: The #MeToo Impact on 2018

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