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Transportation Archive

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Bike Caucus Wants House Certified as Bike-Friendly Workplace

When the League of American Bicyclists released its nationwide list of “Bicycle Friendly Businesses” this month, the State Department, the International Monetary Fund and the National Park Service were among the 20 D.C.-area businesses recognized.

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Norton Takes a Test Drive Ahead of Surface Transportation Rewrite

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., slipped behind the wheel of a sleek, new BMW i3 last week for a test drive in the name of congressional research.

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Airlines, Pilots, Aircraft Makers Look to Ease FAA Permitting Backlog

Aircraft manufacturers, airlines and pilot groups are hoping congressional action will help speed up Federal Aviation Administration certification processes for aircraft, operators and repair stations, all severely backlogged as tight budgets have kept staffing thin.

Pilot ID Mandate May Complicate Licensing

A small provision in last year’s Federal Aviation Administration authorization threatens to complicate government issuance of airman’s certificates to commercial airline pilots.

Cogeneration Systems Kept Some Lights Shining During Sandy

Superstorm Sandy knocked out power for more than 8 million customers in the Northeast last year, but some hospitals and universities in the region managed to keep the lights on by using their combined heat-and-power systems.

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One Year After Sandy, Little Progress on Funding for Storm Resilience

One year ago, Superstorm Sandy slammed into the New Jersey coast, wreaking havoc across the mid-Atlantic region and racking up a preliminary bill of $50 billion in damages — making it the second-costliest hurricane to strike the United States since 1900, according to the National Hurricane Center.

For Appropriators, Olmsted Project Is No Anomaly

The same provision that ignited a backlash this month against the Senate’s top Republican for a so-called “Kentucky kickback” went unnoticed in July, when lawmakers had the opportunity to freely offer amendments to a regular spending bill.

Oregon Eases Privacy Fears About Mileage-Based Highway Tax

The architect of a new mileage-based tax system in Oregon says his state has figured out how to assuage privacy fears, paving the way for serious consideration of the plan as a replacement for the gas tax.

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Congress Eyes Virginia's Model for Funding Transportation Projects

The model for fixing the federal transportation funding shortfall may lie just across the Potomac River.

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Barge Operators to Congress: 'Raise Our Taxes'

It’s not often that an industry comes to Congress begging to pay higher taxes — but that’s exactly what users of the inland waterways barge system are proposing.

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Shuster Uses Social Media in Innovative Pitch for Water Bill

House Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster waited months after the Senate passed a water projects bill to present a House version, but infrastructure policy groups said it was worth the wait.

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Diplomats Try to Defuse Dispute Over EU's Aviation Emission Rules

The airline industry’s attention will turn to Montreal later this month, where European environmental regulators and a host of skeptical nations — including the United States — will square off at the United Nations civil aviation arm’s triennial meeting over how to control jet aircraft emissions.

U.S. Pushes International Aviation Board to Include Taiwan

Forging an agreement on aviation emissions won’t be the only U.S. objective at the upcoming International Civil Aviation Organization meeting in Montreal; diplomats will also be pushing for Taiwan’s entry into the United Nations organization as an observer.

The Need for Parity in Commuter Benefits | Commentary

Members of Congress from both houses and both parties are working to bring permanent parity to pretax benefits for transit and parking. Pretax commuter benefits save millions of middle-class Americans up to 40 percent on the cost of their commute to and from work. As president of WageWorks Commuter Services and former CEO of TransitCenter, one of my primary goals has been to impress on lawmakers the relevance of commuter benefits and the importance of permanent parity. This is ingrained in our vision at WageWorks, where we believe everyone deserves an easier, less expensive commute.

Rail Authorization Delay May Aid Amtrak's Bid for Funds

Postponing action on a rail authorization until Congress takes up broader surface transportation legislation next year may provide Amtrak supporters with a tantalizing opportunity to solve their long-term funding problem.

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Railroad Bill Likely to Be Pushed Off Until Next Year

With time running out before the current authorization of federal railroad programs expires at the end of September, it looks increasingly likely that lawmakers will postpone new rail legislation until next year and roll it into a bigger surface transportation bill.

Familiar Themes From Frustrated Obama

President Barack Obama’s latest pivot-to-the-economy speech at Knox College in Illinois struck familiar themes pointing to a popular-if-thwarted middle-class agenda while challenging Republicans not to shut down the government or spark another default crisis.

Train Crash Revives Debate About Single-Operator Freight Trains

In addition to focusing attention on mechanical concerns about the freight trains that haul crude oil to refineries, the Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, train crash is reviving debate about allowing rural cargo railroads to operate trains with just one professional on board.

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Quebec Rail Accident Focuses Attention on Tanker Car Safety

The freight train derailment and explosion that flattened a tiny Quebec town earlier this month has renewed scrutiny of a widely used type of oil tanker cars that has been a concern by safety watchdogs for years.

A Pragmatic Federal Budget Fix: User-Financed Transportation | Commentary

The recent Skagit River Bridge collapse shone a national spotlight on America’s infrastructure funding crisis, precisely at a time when Washington welcomes a new Transportation Secretary and Congress begins serious discussions around how to fund our nation’s transportation infrastructure. With the 2014 surface transportation reauthorization on the horizon, Congress has a serious choice to make: Do we stick with the same funding strategy that now provides dwindling revenues or do we explore alternative funding options like tolling?

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