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Transportation Archive

Maloney, Ros-Lehtinen Warn of Purple Line Bidder's Ties to Nazi Deportation Trains

As French rail firm Keolis bids to lay down tracks in Metro’s planned Purple Line expansion, two members of the House are demanding that Maryland transportation officials pull the brakes.

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Lawmakers Seek Investments to Make Bicycle Commuting Safer

As cycling to work becomes more popular, it also is getting more dangerous — and a lawmaker is proposing to address the problem by dedicating new funding for construction of infrastructure for bicyclists and pedestrians.

Doctors Pitch the Health Benefits of Bicycling

Bicyclists and pedestrians are joining forces with public health advocates in their bid for a larger share of federal transportation infrastructure.

Can the Right Technology End Distracted Driving? | Commentary

At any given moment during any given day, hundreds of thousands of drivers in the United States are using their phones while behind the wheel — talking, texting or searching for information — and endangering their lives and the lives of those around them. Technology may be part of our daily habits, but using these devices while driving is becoming a fatal vice that threatens to undo the remarkable progress we have made to improve highway safety. According to the National Safety Council, as many as a quarter of today’s automobile crashes involve drivers talking or texting on their phones, and there is no sign of the problem abating.

Oil Export Debate Renews Fight Over Protections for U.S. Shipping

The debate about lifting 1970s restrictions on crude oil exports has renewed another old fight over a 1920 maritime law known as the Jones Act.

More Funding Provided for Electric Car Research

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz is continuing the Obama administration’s programs aimed at helping automakers develop more fuel-efficient vehicles.

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Lawmakers Take On Carmakers Over Repair Parts

Two weeks ago, automaker Chrysler Group LLC sued parts manufacturer LKQ Corp., seeking damages for what it alleges was infringement on 10 patents for the design of car repair parts.

Airlines Seek to Deny Funding for Overseas Customs Station

The dispute about Norwegian Air Service’s request to expand service to the United States piggybacks on the fight by American air carriers and their pilots to deny funding in fiscal 2014 spending legislation for a U.S. Customs and Border Protection preclearance facility at Abu Dhabi’s international airport.

U.S. Carriers Wary of Norwegian Airline's Cut-Rate Wages

U.S.-based airlines and their pilots are waging a new battle against a foreign carrier they contend is taking advantage of provisions in international law to unfairly compete on American routes.

Airlines, Not FCC, Should Decide Whether to Permit In-Flight Cellphone Use | Commentary

The Federal Communications Commission is looking into whether U.S. airlines should allow their customers to use cellphones on flights for email, texting and voice while above 10,000 feet. The mention of this technical possibility has prompted visceral statements from members of Congress about the threat of being trapped on a plane next to obnoxious passengers yapping away for hours.

RESTORE Act Is Key to Flood Insurance Affordability | Commentary

The Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act, passed as part of 2012’s transportation bill, is an important step forward in fixing America’s beleaguered public flood insurance program. For nearly a half-century, taxpayers across the country have been implicitly subsidizing the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is now $25 billion in the red. The simple fact is that premiums collected aren’t sufficient to cover likely costs, and the program is not sustainable as it is currently structured.

Unequal Tax Benefits Punish Public Transit Riders | Commentary

With cuts to tax benefits for transit commuters set to be triggered at the end of the year, it is essential that Congress act to ensure that transit riders benefit from the same tax incentives available to commuters who drive to work.

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Food Service Losses Could Derail Support for Amtrak Subsidies

Florida Republican John L. Mica bristles at the idea of Amtrak partnering with master chefs to upgrade meals on its long-haul trains at a time when the passenger railroad continues to lose tens of millions of dollars a year on its food services.

The Department of Justice's Last Stand in the Airline Industry -- Did It Blink? | Commentary

While the American public may not be familiar with the intricacies of antitrust policy, they have direct, and painful, experience with the results of over a decade of lax antitrust enforcement in the airline industry: high fares, little competition and increasing ancillary fees that are the product of a hub system that facilitates tacit, if not overt, collusion amongst the legacy carriers. Against that backdrop, the Department of Justice’s antitrust challenge to American Airlines/US Airways was a breath of fresh air. Finally, we had antitrust enforcement that did not shy away from the tough challenges raised by the increasing consolidation of the airline industry.

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Bike Caucus Wants House Certified as Bike-Friendly Workplace

When the League of American Bicyclists released its nationwide list of “Bicycle Friendly Businesses” this month, the State Department, the International Monetary Fund and the National Park Service were among the 20 D.C.-area businesses recognized.

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Norton Takes a Test Drive Ahead of Surface Transportation Rewrite

Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-D.C., slipped behind the wheel of a sleek, new BMW i3 last week for a test drive in the name of congressional research.

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Airlines, Pilots, Aircraft Makers Look to Ease FAA Permitting Backlog

Aircraft manufacturers, airlines and pilot groups are hoping congressional action will help speed up Federal Aviation Administration certification processes for aircraft, operators and repair stations, all severely backlogged as tight budgets have kept staffing thin.

Pilot ID Mandate May Complicate Licensing

A small provision in last year’s Federal Aviation Administration authorization threatens to complicate government issuance of airman’s certificates to commercial airline pilots.

Cogeneration Systems Kept Some Lights Shining During Sandy

Superstorm Sandy knocked out power for more than 8 million customers in the Northeast last year, but some hospitals and universities in the region managed to keep the lights on by using their combined heat-and-power systems.

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One Year After Sandy, Little Progress on Funding for Storm Resilience

One year ago, Superstorm Sandy slammed into the New Jersey coast, wreaking havoc across the mid-Atlantic region and racking up a preliminary bill of $50 billion in damages — making it the second-costliest hurricane to strike the United States since 1900, according to the National Hurricane Center.

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