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Lobbyists to Meet With Members at GOP Retreat (Updated)

McCarthy made a pitch for Republican unity, but some are questioning why some lobbyists are on hand at the Hershey retreat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:44 p.m. |  HERSHEY, Pa. — Republican lawmakers from the House and Senate came to Hershey for a joint retreat, to get on the same page and get away from Washington for a few days. But they won't be getting away from lobbyists.  

Quite the contrary, actually. According to a GOP lawmaker who requested anonymity to speak more candidly about the retreat, lobbyists — "for those who paid enough, I guess," the lawmaker said — will be meeting with House Republicans later Thursday, once GOP senators have left after 5:30 p.m.  

According to the member, plenty of House Republicans are scratching their heads at that decision. "What are lobbyists going to be doing up here?" the member said.  

The president of the Congressional Institute, Mark Strand, who is part of the planning for the GOP retreat, told CQ Roll Call it was "not true" that House Republicans would be meeting with lobbyists at 5:30 p.m. Apparently, there are breakout sessions at that time. But Strand did confirm that "private sector supporters of the institute, some of whom are lobbyists, will attend a reception and dinner later tonight."  

In effect, yes, lobbyists will be meeting lawmakers in Hershey.  

That's nothing new, according to a senior GOP aide.  

"While Democrats use taxpayer funds to sponsor their retreats, Republicans have had a long partnership with the bipartisan Congressional Institute to use private funds to organize our issues conferences," said Nate Hodson, who is the deputy chief of staff for Cathy McMorris Rodgers, chairwoman of the House Republican Conference.  

A Democratic leadership aide, asked for a response to the news that Republicans would meet with lobbyists, said the purpose of House Democrats' Caucus-wide conference was to formulate policy and legislative goals for the year. "Unlike our Republican counterparts, we don't solicit or accept lobbyist and special interest money to host these working sessions, nor do we invite lobbyists or special interests to attend our conference."  

Overall, the lawmaker who spoke on background said the GOP retreat, which was supposed to put the House and Senate on the same page , had been somewhat disappointing. "It's all branding, supposedly bigger picture stuff," the lawmaker said.  

"I've never been to marriage counseling, but I'm guessing you go there and everyone talks about all these grand things, and then you go back home and do the same old stuff you've been doing," the member said.  

The GOP lawmaker told CQ Roll Call that Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy had given a "pretty good speech" — saying, "he's a pretty good speaker compared to Boehner" — that was mostly about what Republicans need to get out of Hershey, how they need to work together and with the states.  

But the lawmaker questioned the wisdom of always consulting with the states. "Now wait a minute, you came from California: Everything fails there for Republicans," the member said of McCarthy.  

Still, the lawmaker said Republicans were discussing their 100-day strategy, how they have to get the Department of Homeland Security funding bill through , how they'll start appropriations in February and how Republicans plan to get a budget done.  

But the lawmaker was disappointed that Republicans seemed to want to only "nibble around on Obamacare" — and there didn't seem to be any intention of using the budget reconciliation process to tackle the health care law.  

"That to me is going to be the big one," the lawmaker said. "You know, what's going to happen with the reconciliation, if we're going to use it for [Obamacare]. And McCarthy made no indication they'd use reconciliation for taking on Obamacare. They're setting the basis for tax reform."  

Florida Republican Daniel Webster, fresh off his unsuccessful bid for the speaker , told CQ Roll Call Thursday afternoon that Republicans were getting ready to go into a session entirely on budget reconciliation. Earlier Thursday morning, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., gave a speech about managing expectations. According to Webster, McConnell told Republicans, "Look: Here's how our process works. It's pretty rough. We don't have 60 votes. There are a lot of things that we're going to have to work on with coalitions."  

Webster said the reaction to the speech was warm. "People get it," he said. A former speaker of the Florida statehouse and state Senate majority leader, Webster said Congress works the same way that state legislatures work: "House proposes, Senate disposes."  

On the whole, lawmakers said the retreat had a definite '90s theme, with speakers such as comedian Jay Leno, pollster Frank Luntz, columnist Peggy Noonan, and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.  

Arizona Republican Matt Salmon — who was in Congress in the '90s, left in 2001, and came back in 2012 — compared the retreat to the movie "Hot Tub Time Machine."  

On the topic of jokes, Leno spoke to members Thursday night for about an hour, and according to the member who spoke on background, the joke that got the biggest laugh was that President "Barack Obama had so messed up this country, that Republicans aren't even safe in their own country clubs."  

"That's a joke, it means so much, because so many people still think that we go to exclusive resorts and don't let people in to see what — oh, that's kind of what we're doing," the lawmaker said ironically, aware that reporters would get limited access to lawmakers while Republicans met behind-closed-doors at a resort spa with a nine-hole golf course.  

The lawmaker also said Republicans had a "big long spiel" on how the welfare overhaul happened in the '90s.  

"Find out what was the most popular song in 1995, and that's the one they're playing in there," the lawmaker said.  

For the record, Coolio's "Gangsta's Paradise" was No. 1 that year.  

Humberto Sanchez contributed to this report. Related: GOP Heads to Joint Retreat With Coordination, Realism on Agenda The 114th: CQ Roll Call's Guide to the New Congress Get breaking news alerts and more from Roll Call in your inbox or on your iPhone.