Tom Cole

Republicans come out against Iran language they previously supported
Many House members who supported amendments on War Powers now opposed

Language from Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., on authorizing military force that Republicans previously supported is unlikely to have that same kind of support as the GOP shifts its stance since the recent hostilities with Iran. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In July, 27 Republicans voted for an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act to effectively prohibit the president from using military force against Iran without congressional approval. As the House readies to vote on a similar measure Thursday, few, if any, Republicans are likely to support it.

U.S. tension with Iran has escalated since July, resulting in recent attacks from both sides. President Donald Trump’s decision to kill Iran’s top general Qassem Soleimani has drawn praise from Republicans who believe the administration line about the Quds Force commander and criticism from Democrats who say the intelligence does not support that claim.

Relive impeachment week from behind the scenes on Capitol Hill

Rep. Greg Steube, R-Fla., does a TV news interview in Statuary Hall as the House takes up articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House voted to impeach President Donald Trump this week. 

The chamber's inquiry that was launched Sept. 24 came to a close Wednesday on a largely party-line vote in the House. CQ Roll Call has covered it from the start. 

After a busy week, Congress is ready for the holidays: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Dec. 16, 2019

Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney speaks with reporters as she passes the holiday sign in the basement of the Capitol as she leaves the House Democrats caucus meeting on Dec. 17. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Three things to watch as Trump reacts to his impeachment
Spokeswoman said president was working rather than watching TV. Then came his tweet

A Trump supporter yells at pro-impeachment demonstrators as they rally in front of the Capitol on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — In so many ways, the likely split screen Wednesday evening of the House voting to impeach President Donald Trump as he is on stage at a campaign rally is fitting.

In fact, there will be a certain poetry as the two events coincide — no, collide — in real-time. A special prime time edition of what so often over the last three years has felt like a dramatic made-for-television presidency that has been referred to in this space and others as “The Trump Show.”

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 18
House ends historic impeachment debate, majority votes to impeach Trump

House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., is seen in the Capitol’s Statuary Hall during procedural votes on the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House shortly before noon began debate on the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders said they were on track to vote on them this evening.

While Republicans moved to adjourn the House shortly after it convened and introduced another resolution condemning the Democratic committee chairmen who led the impeachment inquiry, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told reporters that the House will definitely complete debate and vote on impeachment today.

House to hold separate votes on Trump impeachment articles
Rules Committee finalizes procedure for Wednesday after contentious hearing spanning more than 10 hours

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called on her Democratic Caucus to join her on the floor on Wednesday before the House begins debate on the impeachment articles against President Donald Trump on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

The full House will debate and vote separately on two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday, under a process set up by the House Rules Committee on Tuesday night after a contentious hearing that spanned more than 10 hours.

The Rules panel adopted a closed rule in a 9-4 party-line vote just after 9 p.m., which means no amendments to the articles will be considered on the House floor.

Impeachment news roundup: Dec. 17
House Republicans put up united front ahead of impeachment vote

Maryland Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin, right, a House Judiciary Committee member, confers with counsel Barry Berke during the House Rules Committee markup of articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Dec. 17. Judiciary Committee ranking member Doug Collins, R-Ga., is at left. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans huddled Tuesday evening for their weekly conference meeting and emerged with confidence that their party will remain united in opposing the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump that Democrats are bringing to the floor Wednesday.

“Have you not seen us united? Have you not witnessed us united?” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said when a reporter asked if he was confident Republicans will unanimously oppose the articles. “The reason why I know we’ll stay united is because the facts are on our side ... the process has been failed, [Democrats] picked a timeline and they stuck to their timeline without having any facts for it.”

Strange bedfellows as local battles over Airbnb attract Capitol Hill attention
Members of Progressive and Freedom caucuses allied on side of hotel industry

Hawaii Democratic Rep. Ed Case, who returned to Congress after working in the hotel industry, has attracted co-sponsors from both ends of the political spectrum for his bill that would ensure local regulations apply to short-term rental sites like Airbnb. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

 

It was the most expensive local referendum in New Jersey history. Airbnb raised more than $4 million this fall to fight one city’s regulations on short-term rentals. But in a high-profile blow as the company prepares to go public next year, the short-term lodging service lost overwhelmingly, defeated by a coalition of groups that spent one-fourth of the money.

Congress seeks to avoid an approps nightmare before Christmas
Appropriators and congressional leadership have just three weeks to resolve dozens of policy disputes between House and Senate spending bills

Sens. Jon Tester, D-Mont., and Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., are seen during a Senate Appropriations Committee markup in June 2019. Lawmakers have just three weeks to iron out dozens of policy disputes between House and Senate spending bills. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congress returns to Washington this week with a challenging to-do list for December that not only includes drafting articles of impeachment and finalizing a massive trade deal, but also funding the government.

Appropriators and congressional leadership have just three weeks to resolve dozens of policy disputes between House and Senate spending bills — a daunting but routine exercise that will determine whether there’s a partial government shutdown right as lawmakers are set to leave for their winter break.

House debates ‘process’ and ‘precedent’ for impeachment
Watch the full floor debate

House members debate a resolution outlining the process for public impeachment proceedings. (Screenshots/ House Recording Studio)