Thomas Massie

Meet the lawmakers who bucked their parties on vote to limit Trump’s war powers
Eight Democrats opposed the resolution, while three Republicans supported it

New York Democratic Rep. Max Rose said he refused “to play politics with questions of war and peace” before opposing a war powers resolution Thursday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated Jan. 10 11:30 a.m. | The House voted largely along party lines Thursday to adopt a resolution directing President Donald Trump to not use military force against Iran without congressional approval unless it was necessary to defend Americans.

But 11 lawmakers, mostly Democrats, bucked their parties on the vote. Most of those Democrats face competitive reelections this year.

Republicans come out against Iran language they previously supported
Many House members who supported amendments on War Powers now opposed

Language from Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., on authorizing military force that Republicans previously supported is unlikely to have that same kind of support as the GOP shifts its stance since the recent hostilities with Iran. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In July, 27 Republicans voted for an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act to effectively prohibit the president from using military force against Iran without congressional approval. As the House readies to vote on a similar measure Thursday, few, if any, Republicans are likely to support it.

U.S. tension with Iran has escalated since July, resulting in recent attacks from both sides. President Donald Trump’s decision to kill Iran’s top general Qassem Soleimani has drawn praise from Republicans who believe the administration line about the Quds Force commander and criticism from Democrats who say the intelligence does not support that claim.

GOP candidates seize on gun rights movement sweeping across Virginia
Opponents to Rep. Elaine Luria turn out to vocally support ‘Second Amendment sanctuary’ movement

Speaker Nancy Pelosi during an event last January touting a bill the House later passed to expand gun background checks. Republican candidates this year are trying to put Democrats on the defensive using declarations by local governments that their cities are sanctuaries for the Second Amendment. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A gun rights movement spreading across Virginia came to the heart of Democrat Elaine Luria’s swing district Monday night, when city officials voted to make Virginia Beach — the site of a 2019 mass shooting — a “sanctuary” for Second Amendment rights. 

The resolution is one of more than 100 similar measures passed in Virginia localities since Democrats flipped the state legislature in November on a platform that included gun control, prompting blowback from some conservatives who say it could be a rallying cry up and down the ballot in Virginia and other purple states in the 2020 elections.

Photos of the day: House readies for historic impeachment vote against Trump
Dec. 18 as captured by CQ Roll Call's photojournalism staff

The public lines up in the Capitol Visitor Center to watch the House vote on the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 6:16 p.m. | On a crisp, cold Dec. 18 in Washington, the House is preparing for a historic vote on two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. 

CQ Roll Call’s photojournalists are capturing the events of the day on and around Capitol Hill. Check back for updates. 

‘Can’t get into that’: Mueller’s testimony was too hot to handle — Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of July 22, 2019

Rep. Mark Meadows takes a photo with his phone as former special counsel Robert Mueller testifies during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday, July 24, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Thomas Massie TBTs to his summer fling
Kentucky congressman won the internet on Thursday

A 19-year-old Thomas Massie, in white cap, embarked on a 10-day trip across the U.S. in a solar-powered  vehicle named "Galaxy." (Courtesy Rep. Thomas Massie via Twitter)

There are two kinds of TBTs: the kind that we pause to view ever so quickly, perhaps give it a double tap, and then continue the scroll through the rest of our feed. And then there’s the kind that stops us cold, takes hold of our vision and raise questions faster than we can raise our eyebrows.

This morning, Rep. Thomas Massie blessed us with the latter.

DC’s ‘acting’ bug spreads to the Hill
House Freedom Caucus is getting in on the act

House Freedom Caucus members, from left, Reps. Mark Meadows, Thomas Massie, and Jim Jordan have a new acting communications director. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Freedom Caucus now has an acting communications director as the outgoing flack takes a new position with Vice President Mike Pence.

The position adds to the long list of “actings” in President Donald Trump’s D.C. If you’re keeping count there’s an acting White House chief of staff, secretary of Homeland Security, secretary of Defense, secretary of the Navy, as well as the heads of the Small Business Association and the Office of Management and Budget.

House Democrats lose procedural vote to GOP minority for first time in months
Approval of Republican motion to recommit on Financial Services spending bill added a last-minute Iran amendment

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said the members of his caucus who voted for the GOP motion to recommit felt they had to support the Iran language. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Democratic majority on Wednesday lost a procedural vote to the Republican minority for the first time in four months, as 37 Democrats joined Republicans in adding a last-minute Iran amendment to the Financial Services spending bill.

The amendment was approved through a Republican motion to recommit, or MTR — a procedural tool of the minority used primarily for messaging.

House finally sends $19.1 billion disaster aid package to Trump’s desk
Trump has said he supports the bill and is expected to sign it

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., was among the Republicans who blocked a disaster aid bill from moving over the Memorial Day recess. That bill now heads to the president’s desk. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House sent a $19.1 billion disaster aid package to President Donald Trump’s desk Monday, more than a week after the first of three Republican holdouts objected to passing the legislation by unanimous consent.

The bill, which was the result of months of exhaustive negotiations between Republicans, Democrats and the White House, received a vote of 354-58 just hours after the House returned from a weeklong Memorial Day break. 

Flood insurance gets renewal as disaster aid remains stalled
The package will instead likely pass the House on Monday when that chamber returns for recorded votes

Rep. John Rose, R-Tenn., attends a House Financial Services Committee organizational meeting in Rayburn Building on January 30, 2019. On Thursday Rose became the third Republican to object to clearing disaster aid legislation by unanimous consent. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A bipartisan $19.1 billion disaster aid bill hit another speed bump in the House on Thursday, but the National Flood Insurance Program got an extension. 

The disaster aid package, which received final sign-off from Republicans and Democrats as well as the Trump administration a week ago, was blocked when a third GOP congressman who objected to clearing the legislation through unanimous consent. It will instead likely pass the House on Monday when that chamber returns for recorded votes.