Ted Lieu

Motivational Speakers: Members Hit the Graduation Circuit
Harris, Booker, Flake and Warner among those sending off this spring’s graduates

Virginia Sens. Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Mark Warner, D-Va., are both speaking at graduation ceremonies in their home state next month. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Politicians, often blessed with the gift of the gab, are rarely shy about sharing stories about how they got to where they are.

And some of them will be sharing their wisdom and inspiration at graduation ceremonies, beginning next month. Students wrapping up their college or graduate school experiences can expect to hear about following their dreams or — considering the number of Trump critics among the speakers — what not to do. 

Floor Charts for the Floor Show
Our favorite visual aids from congressional floor-watching

(Courtesy @FloorCharts screenshot of C-SPAN)

From tributes to senators to hours of testimony from a tech giant, spring has been a visual mixed bag in Congress.

Lawmakers like these oversized and sometimes garish visual aids because they help them get their point across. The Twitter handle @FloorCharts posts some of the daily highlights, and we’re doing a monthly roundup of the best of the best.

Lieu Apologizes for Inviting Parkland Student to Try California Pot
Kyle Kashuv has gained popularity on Twitter among conservative circles

Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., apologized for a tweet Sunday inviting a survivor of the Parkland, Florida, shooting to experience the state’s cannabis when he turns 21. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Ted Lieu issued a quick apology on Twitter Sunday after inviting a Parkland, Florida, school shooting survivor, Kyle Kashuv, to California to experience the state’s “awesome cannabis” when he turns 21.

“While I am proud of California’s legal cannabis law, I can see why saying this to you can be misinterpreted because you are not 21,” Lieu wrote in reply to Kashuv about the post. “I hereby apologize. You should listen to your parents.”

Stormy Daniels Lawsuit Raises Election Law Questions for Trump
Democratic lawmakers have asked FBI to investigate payments from president’s lawyer to porn actress

Pornographic actress Stormy Daniels alleges she had an affair with President Donald Trump during the months after first lady Melania Trump gave birth to their son, Barron Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As special counsel Robert S. Mueller III continues to probe members of President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign for possible collusion with Russia, some lawmakers have raised ethical concerns over the president’s alleged cover-up of an affair with porn actress Stormy Daniels.

Reps. Kathleen Rice of New York and Ted Lieu of California, both former prosecutors, have asked the FBI to investigate payments from Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, to Daniels, who filed a lawsuit Tuesday against the president in Los Angeles Superior Court.

Bipartisan Bill Seeks to End Political ‘Burrowing’
Legislation would create cooling off period to prevent appointees from moving into career positions

Rep. Ken Buck, R-Colo., co-sponsored legislation to end the process of political “burrowing,” in which political appointees take career positions in the federal government. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A bipartisan duo’s legislation to prevent political appointees from receiving career positions in the federal government moves to the Senate after passing the House on Tuesday.

Democratic Rep. Ted Lieu of California and Republican Rep. Ken Buck of Colorado introduced The Political Appointee Burrowing Prevention Act, which was approved by a voice vote.

California Democrats Hope to Mitigate Primary Problem
Some lawmakers are concerned they have too many Democrats running

Sam Jammal is one of several Democrats running to replace Rep. Ed Royce in California’s 39th District. (D.A. Banks/CQ Roll Call file photo)

California Democrats know they have a primary problem. 

“Put it this way,” Rep. Raul Ruiz said. “It’s part of my prayers.”

Democrats Rain on Trump’s Military Parade
Army veteran Walz: ‘Stupidest thing I’ve ever heard’

Rep. Tim Walz, D-Minn., said the idea of a military parade is “the stupidest thing I’ve ever heard.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic members of Congress criticized reports that President Donald Trump had directed the military to plan for a parade in Washington, D.C. 

Trump reportedly told the Pentagon he wanted a parade similar to the one in France he witnessed on Bastille Day. 

Markey, Lieu Push ‘First Strike’ Bill After Trump Taunts Kim
President to North Korean leader: My ‘nuclear button’ is ‘much bigger & more powerful’

A North Korean ballistic missile during "Victory Day" parade in 2013. (Wikimedia Commons)

Lawmakers are pushing legislation anew that would limit Donald Trump’s ability to launch nuclear weapons on his own after the president taunted North Korea’s leader over the size and lethality of his “nuclear button.”

After North Korean leader Kim Jong-un used part of his New Year's message to remind the world he has a “nuclear button,” Trump responded with a Tuesday evening tweet about his own atomic button.

Why Net Neutrality Isn't Dead Yet
The Week Ahead, Episode 83

Ajit Pai, Chairman of Federal Communications Commission (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Internet service providers say they'd like Congress to pass a law mandating net neutrality now that the Federal Communications Commission has rescinded the rule requiring them to abide by it. But the providers also want Congress to exempt them from broader FCC regulation, says Rick Boucher, a former Democratic representative who now works for the industry. CQ reporter Alan Ota says such a measure faces a tough road on Capitol Hill.

 

Heard on the Hilloween
We asked staffers to send us their costumes

Aides for Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., from left, Lindsay Black, Marcie Kinzel, and Katie Waldman, are seen in their costumes in their Hart Senate Office Building office on Wednesday. The three represent the 3 cows-to-1 person population ration in Montana. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

While most of the Halloween spirit around Capitol Hill was sported by dogs on Tuesday, some humans got into the spirit, too.

HOH asked staffers to send photographs of themselves at work in their Halloween costumes.