Ruben Gallego

Hispanic Lawmakers Show Bipartisan Tone on Immigration
DACA debate has prompted strong positions from members of both parties

Nevada Rep. Ruben Kihuen, left — seen here with New York Rep. Adriano Espaillat — says prior bipartisan work on immigration was an example of “how great this country is.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When it comes to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, there is little daylight among most Hispanic members of Congress, regardless of party affiliation.

President Donald Trump has said he will phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, but gave Congress a six-month window to come up with a legislative fix. By and large, Hispanic lawmakers from both parties criticized the president’s decision and said Congress needs to protect immigrants covered by DACA, also known as Dreamers, so named after the proposed DREAM Act that would provide them with a path to legal status. 

Watch: Members Talk About Their Hispanic Heritage
 

Take Five: Jimmy Gomez
California Democrat reflects on his first week in Congress

California Rep. Jimmy Gomez previously worked on the Hill for Rep. Hilda L. Solis and recalls telling himself he wouldn’t return to Washington until he was a member of Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. Jimmy Gomez, 42, a California Democrat, talks about the time between his being elected and being sworn in, returning as a former Hill staffer, and his welcome to Washington compared to Montana Rep. Greg Gianforte’s.

Q: What has surprised you about Congress so far?

Rep. Mike Coffman Announces Divorce
Mike and state AG Cynthia Coffman were considered power couple in Colorado

Rep. Mike Coffman, R-Colo., may skipping voting for president entirely. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Colorado Republican power couple Rep. Mike Coffman and state Attorney General Cynthia Coffman have filed for divorce.

The Coffmans are breaking up after 12 years of marriage, the Denver Post reported on Monday.

Word on the Hill: Embassy Chef Competition
Wreath-laying for women in the military

Belgium is one of the countries represented in the Embassy Chef Challenge this evening. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Decide for yourself which embassy has the best cuisine.

Thirty-nine chefs from countries in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas are competing in Events DC’s Embassy Chef Challenge at 6 p.m. today. Last year’s winner was the chef from the Embassy of the Philippines, and in 2015, the Embassy of Barbados took home the trophy.

Resources Request From Comey Disputed
Rosenstein: No evidence Comey asked for additional resources

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves the Capitol after briefing the House of Representatives on the firing of former FBI Director James Comey and the investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 campaign on Friday, May 19, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By REMA RAHMAN and LINDSEY McPHERSON

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told members of the House Friday that he had no evidence former FBI Director James Comey asked for more resources before his firing.

Political Reaction to Comey Strikes Familiar Pattern
Democrats see opportunity, Republican responses vary

FBI Director James B. Comey’s firing has appeared to knock the issue of the GOP health care bill off the front pages. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A familiar pattern emerged after President Donald Trump fired FBI Director James B. Comey: Democrats pressured Republicans to weigh in, vulnerable Republicans tried to distance themselves, and others stayed quiet.

With the 2018 midterms still 18 months away, political operatives in both parties say it’s difficult to predict what issues will dominate the campaigns. But what followed Comey’s dismissal suggests that both parties may be continuing strategies they developed during last year’s elections: Democrats seek to tie Republicans to Trump, and Republicans try to stay above the the fray of the ever-changing news cycle. 

Some Democrats ‘Adopt a District’ to Talk Health Care
At least 4 House Democrats have held or plan to hold events in GOP districts

New York Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney talks with constituents during a town hall in Newburgh, N.Y., on June 11, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

One House Democrat was in enemy territory Monday night, and he was on a mission.

“I’m Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney,” the New York lawmaker told a crowd gathered at an industrial event space in Kingston in a neighboring Empire State district. “Where the heck is your congressman?”

Democrats Delight in GOP Health Care Defeat
Pelosi says party is glad to own 2010 health law

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, left, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, right, welcomed the decision by Republican leadership to pull the health care bill from the House floor. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Cheers went out from the Democratic cloakroom Friday when the news broke that Republicans were pulling their health care bill from the floor, and Democrats on the floor chanted “vote! vote!” as the majority lacked the votes opted to pass it. 

The minority party was more subdued at a press conference afterward, but House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and her leadership team still delighted in their victory.

Republicans Cancel Vote on Health Care Bill
Democrats chant ‘Vote, vote, vote’

Vice President Mike Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price leave their meeting with members of the House Freedom Caucus at the Capitol Hill Club. A failed final effort to secure the votes necessary to pass legislation repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Friday canceled a scheduled vote on the Republican bill to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law, in what could be a catastrophic blow to the party’s seven-year campaign against the law.

Cheers could be heard from the House Democratic cloakroom as the news spread.