republicans

Benghazi Committee Declines to Fault Clinton
 

The Select Committee on Benghazi released an 800-page report Tuesday detailing its findings on the 2012 attack on a U.S. consulate in Libya that resulted in the deaths of four Americans. During a press conference, committee Chairman Trey Gowdy declined to assign specific blame to Democrat presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, saying he’s “not in the business of apportioning culpability. I think there’s enough to go around.”

Rubio Faces Immigration Questions From Both Sides

Rubio leaves a campaign event near Samford University in Birmingham, Ala on Feb. 27. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — "If you are elected president, what is my pathway towards citizenship?"  

That might not be a question Sen. Marco Rubio expected to face at a forum sponsored by the conservative Yellowhammer News on a university campus here.  

Polling Gets Sauce-y

What do you get when you combine BBQ sauce and presidential politics? (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When barbecue sauce and presidential campaigns come together, who knows what could happen. South Carolina, known for its great BBQ, inspired some interesting and unique questions.  

This weekend, Public Policy Polling surveyed 897 likely Republican primary voters and 525 likely Democratic primary voters in the Palmetto State. And, the 29th question on the survey introduced the topic: “Do you prefer mustard, tomato, or vinegar based barbecue sauce?”  

Ad Politicizing Violence Against Women Law is Pulled

   

An ad criticizing presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio for voting against the Violence Against Women Act will not be making it to the airwaves in New Hampshire, after the state's GOP Sen. Kelly Ayotte objected strenuously.  

Can Gowdy Help Rubio in Iowa?

Gowdy is scheduled to campaign with Rubio in Iowa. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Update Dec. 29 3 p.m. |  Sen. Marco Rubio will get a boost ahead of the Iowa caucuses as Rep. Trey Gowdy will join him to campaign on Tuesday.  

Gowdy gained clout with many on the right for his work as chairman of the House Benghazi Committee that investigated the deadly 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in the Libyan city as well as Hillary Clinton’s response to it as secretary of state. Gowdy conducted a marathon hearing  with Clinton in the hot seat in October.  

Conservative Groups Not Rushing to Help Burr Primary Challenger

Brannon has launched a repeat bid for Senate after losing it in 2014's GOP primary.  (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Obstetrician and 2014 Senate candidate Greg Brannon barely snuck under Monday's filing deadline to challenge North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr in March's primary.  

Whether that's too late for Brannon to amass the tea party support he might need to unseat a two-term senator remains to be seen, but so far, the kinds of groups that would back an anti-incumbent challenger such as Brannon don't sound effusive about his candidacy.  

Races Where Spending Bill Vote Could Be an Issue

Neither Republicans nor Democrats, whose Senate committee is led by Tester, see a clear political win from the omnibus vote. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Congress hadn't even left town when political campaigns in some of the most competitive House and Senate races zeroed in on Friday’s vote on a massive government spending bill. But rather than cleaving along partisan lines, Democrats and Republicans — incumbents and challengers alike — came down on both sides of the issue depending on their states and districts, suggesting national party committees aren't likely to take up the vote in their national messaging. The chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker, voted for the bill – even though some of his most vulnerable colleagues opposed it – while Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Chairman Jon Tester of Montana opposed it, with similar divergences in his own party. In the case of this bill, every candidate is on their own.  

Pennsylvania Senate Sen. Patrick J. Toomey voted against the bill, criticizing it as an instrument of the government’s “out-of-control spending” that would exacerbate the deficit, fund the resettlement of Syrian refugees and implement “damaging” federal regulations. And yet, in a statement released after the vote, he went on to tout that the bill for which he did not vote includes bipartisan proposals that he said will support jobs in the Keystone State. He also praised the bill’s suspension of the medical device tax, support for the military, Alzheimer’s research and health care for 9/11 responders.   That’s a contradiction that former Rep. Joe Sestak, who’s vying for the Democratic nomination to challenge Toomey in 2016, seized on in Twitter messages Friday afternoon. https://twitter.com/JoeSestak/status/677930799744868354  

It's A Deal: Republicans Settle for Notable Omnibus Wins

Republicans said Ryan deserved high praise for creating a more inclusive, collaborative environment in the lead-up to the omnibus negotiations. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has been offering members the same refrain since taking the gavel from John A. Boehner two months ago.  

He'd been dealt a bad hand by the old regime, according to the Wisconsin Republican, and the best thing for everyone was to make it through the end of the year so the Republican House can return to "regular order" and run the government as it should.  

McConnell and Ryan Aren't Sweating 2016 Presidential Nominee

McConnell dismissed talk of a brokered convention. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul D. Ryan both said Tuesday they aren’t worried about the Republican presidential primary and suggested they believe an establishment candidate will ultimately prevail.

Appearing back-to-back at a Politico Playbook breakfast, McConnell and Ryan, who rarely comment on presidential politics, dodged questions about specific candidates such as Donald Trump or Ted Cruz. But they offered some insight into how they think the 2016 elections will unfold and downplayed suggestions that a highly contested GOP primary battle will hurt the party. 

Tammy Duckworth Scores SEIU Endorsement

The SEIU endorsement gives Duckworth a pool of skilled political workers to assist her campaign. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Rep. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., on Monday received the endorsement of the SEIU Illinois State Council, a vote of confidence from labor leaders and a pool of manpower that should help her in the three-way Democratic primary for the Senate seat held by Republican Mark S. Kirk.  

“SEIU is an incredibly effective and diverse organization, and we share a commitment to fighting to improve the lives of working families and making our state a fairer and more decent place,” Duckworth said in a release. “I am proud to stand with the working men and women of SEIU, and I look forward to continuing to work to rebuild our middle class, create jobs and raise wages, and provide a measure of economic and retirement security for hardworking Illinois families.”