Patrick T McHenry

Take Five: Jodey Arrington
Texas Republican talks about the ‘happy crazy’ of having his family with him in D.C.

Rep. Jodey C. Arrington, R-Texas, tells people he walked on to the Texas Tech football team “and limped off in the same semester.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Jodey C. Arrington, 45, a Texas Republican, talks about having his family in D.C., listening to Eminem and walking on to the Texas Tech football team.

Q: What has surprised you most about Congress so far?

Take Five: Joe Crowley
New York Democrat is a big fan of One Direction’s Harry Styles and Niall Horan

New York Rep. Joseph Crowley says politics is about making friends, not enemies. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Joseph Crowley, 55, a New York Democrat and the House Democratic Caucus chairman, talks about the appetite for political engagement, advice for young people getting into politics and all the books he has been reading.

Q: What about this Congress so far is different from what you’ve seen in the past?

North Carolina Delegation on Swapping Out a White Supremacist for Billy Graham
Statue of Charles Aycock would come down to put Graham up following his death on Wednesday

Tourists pass by the statue of Charles Brantley Aycock in the Crypt of the U.S. Capitol. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When the Rev. Billy Graham died last week at the age of 99, it set in motion a plan to memorialize him in the U.S. Capitol — and to kick out a white supremacist.

Graham will briefly lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda. But his likeness could endure in the building for much longer than that.

Take Five: David Kustoff
Tennessee Republican saves time and money by not eating all day

Tennessee Rep. David Kustoff tells his constituents about how hardworking Capitol Hill staffers are. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. David Kustoff, 51, a Tennessee Republican, talks about eating only once a day, how he’s proud of Sarah Huckabee Sanders, and his morning routine.

Q: What has surprised you so far in Congress?

House Passes Stopgap Spending Bill to End Government Shutdown
Enough Democrats voted ‘yes’ to offset Republican defections

The House followed the Senate in voting for a sweeping package that keeps the government open until at least March 23. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House early Friday morning passed a six-week stopgap spending bill carrying a massive budget deal, ending a less-than-six-hour government shutdown without Speaker Paul D. Ryan providing Democrats the exact commitment they were seeking on an immigration vote.

President Donald Trump will sign the measure Friday morning, spokesman Raj Shah said without specifying a time. 

Take Five: Patrick McHenry
North Carolina Republican on filling in as whip during Scalise’s absence: ‘It’s not easy’

Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., says he kept Steve Scalise’s seat where it always was when he filled in as whip. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Patrick T. McHenry, 42, a North Carolina Republican, talks about what he learned as acting whip, his new daughter and his relationship with Rep. Maxine Waters.

Q:  What was the experience of filling in as acting Republican whip for your friend, Steve Scalise, last year?

How House Republicans Got to ‘Yes’ on Funding the Government
Leaders navigated twists and turns in negotiations with the Freedom Caucus

Speaker Paul D. Ryan leaves his office in the Capitol on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

All eyes will be on the Senate on Friday as lawmakers there race against the clock to avert a government shutdown. But over in the House, Republicans are happy they were able to pass a four-week stopgap measure without turning to the Democrats for help.

It wasn’t an easy task for House GOP leaders to cobble up the 216 votes within their conference needed to pass a continuing resolution. (The bill ended up passing Thursday, 230-197.) Yet throughout the negotiations, leadership remained confident its members would get there, given the urgency of the deadline and the political consequences if they failed to meet it.

Freedom Caucus Gets on Board CR
Promises to bust budget caps for defense programs sealed deal

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., stops to speak with reporters about the continuing resolution on Thursday. He wants a different stopgap funding measure from GOP leadership that his group can support. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

After a day of public disagreements regarding a stopgap funding bill, House GOP leaders, the conservative Freedom Caucus and President Donald Trump have reached a breakthrough.

“The majority of the Freedom Caucus has taken a vote to support the CR effort this evening,” the group tweeted Thursday.

The Battle of North Carolina: McHenry vs. Meadows
House GOP dynamics between Tar Heel duo on display heading into funding vote

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows is engaged in a battle of vote counts with his fellow North Carolinian, Chief Deputy Whip Patrick T. McHenry. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Two North Carolina Republicans from bordering districts, both representing the Asheville area, are engaged in a battle of confidence heading into a critical government funding vote Thursday.

House Chief Deputy Whip Patrick T. McHenry confidently asserted Thursday afternoon as he headed to vote on a rule setting up debate on a four-week continuing resolution, which passed, that the stopgap would pass the House later that evening with GOP votes and without any changes.

Inside the House Republican Brain Drain
Record exodus by members who’ve wielded gavels will complicate next year

House Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce isn’t seeking re-election. He’s part of a record wave of departures by House chairmen. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

This has already become a wave election year, because a record wave of departures by House chairmen already guarantees a sea change in the Republican power structure next January.

Even if the GOP manages to hold on to its majority this fall, its policymaking muscle for the second half of President Donald Trump’s term will need some prolonged rehabilitation. And if the party gets swept back into the minority, its aptitude for stopping or co-opting the newly ascendant Democrats’ agenda will require some serious retraining.