open-seat

Lindsey Graham Wants Rick Scott in Senate GOP Meetings Ahead of Recount Deadlines
S.C. senator thinks Scott will win, and should take part in leadership elections

Sen. Lindsey Graham, right, campaigned with Florida Gov. Rick Scott in Orlando ahead of Election Day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Lindsey Graham said that Florida Gov. Rick Scott should make plans to come up to D.C. to participate in next week’s Senate Republican Conference meetings.

That includes the leadership elections for the 116th Congress, which are scheduled for Wednesday morning.

Meet Carol Miller. She Could Be the Only New Republican Woman Coming to Congress Next Year.
The GOP’s only new woman, so far, will represent West Virginia’s 3rd District

West Virginia Republican Carol Miller may be the only new GOP woman in the next Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Among the 33 new women elected to the House this week, only one is a Republican. 

Carol Miller, the majority whip in the West Virginia state House and daughter of a former Ohio congressman, won the Mountain State’s 3rd District seat Tuesday night, defeating Democratic state Sen. Richard Ojeda.

There Will Be More Latinos in Congress Than Ever
42 Hispanic members will serve in the 116th Congress

Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington won a fourth term in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler’s re-election win made official Wednesday night, Congress is set to see its largest ever class of Latino lawmakers. 

There will be at least 42 Latinos serving, between both chambers, come January.

Karen Handel Concedes in Race for Full Term in Georgia’s 6th District
Handel came to Congress after expensive special election last year

GOP Rep. Karen Handel lost her bid for a full term in Georgia’s 6th District. (By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats this week did what they failed to do in last year’s expensive special election: flip Georgia’s 6th District. 

Republican Rep. Karen Handel, who won that June 2017 special election to fill the open seat in the Atlanta suburbs and was running for her first full term this year, conceded Thursday morning to gun control activist Lucy McBath.

Republicans Maintain Senate Control
Democrats lose seats in Indiana, North Dakota and Missouri

Senate Republicans, led by Mitch McConnell, have retained their control of the chamber after the 2018 midterms. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans will maintain control of the Senate, but it is still unclear by how narrow a margin.

The Associated Press projects the chamber will remain in Republican hands, with a Democratic takeover blocked after losses in Indiana and North Dakota. Things got worse for Democrats later in the night when they lost Missouri, too. 

Marsha Blackburn Prevails in Tennessee Senate Race
She becomes the Volunteer State’s first female senator (and the first GOP woman elected statewide)

Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., speaks at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, in 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican Marsha Blackburn has won the open-seat Senate race in Tennessee, defeating a popular former governor.

With 74percent of precincts reporting, the eight-term congresswoman led Democrat Phil Bredesen 55 percent to 43 percent in the race to succeed retiring GOP Sen. Bob Corker when The Associated Press called the race.

A Poor Election Night for Republicans in Clinton Districts
GOP-held seats that Clinton won in 2016 mostly swung to the Democrats this year

Rep. Barbara Comstock, R-Va., represented a district Hillary Clinton won by 10 points in 2016. She lost her bid for a third term Tuesday night to Democrat Jennifer Wexton. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated Sunday, 1:38 p.m. | Democrats have won a House majority, boosted by several key pickups of Republican-held districts that backed Hillary Clinton two years ago. 

The party needed a net of 23 seats to take over the chamber. 

Election Day 2018 in Photos
Roll Call's photographers are in Virginia and Florida to cover the midterms in America

GOP Florida Gov. Rick Scott holds the hand of his grandson, Auguste, during his election night party in Naples, Fla., after he declared victory over Sen. Bill Nelson in the state's Senate race. His daughter, Allison, and son-in-law, Pierre Guimard, also appear. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 12:36 a.m. on Nov. 7 | The midterms are winding down as Democrats claim control of the House and Republicans maintain control of the Senate. Roll Call's photographers have been covering the day from Florida to Virginia.

The Florida Senate race appears to be an upset of incumbent Democrat Bill Nelson. The seat will go to Republican Gov. Rick Scott who spoke from his election night party in Naples, Fla. 

5 Reasons Why Democrats Are Poised to Take Over the House
Money, Trump and a few unexpected breaks have boosted party’s chances

Harley Rouda, a Democrat running for California's 48th Congressional District, speaks during his campaign rally in Laguna Beach, Calif. in May (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At the start of this election cycle, historical trends suggested Democrats were likely to make gains in the House. Two years later, they appear to be on the verge of taking over the chamber. A few surprising developments helped them get there.

While President Donald Trump has attempted to deflect blame should Republicans lose House control Tuesday, he has certainly been a factor in this year’s contests. That’s typical for midterm elections — the president’s party has lost an average of 33 seats in 18 of the last 20 midterms.

A Definitive Ranking of Midterm Celebrity Stumpers
Actors, singers and sports legends got involved in 2018. But how much did they really do?

Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate from Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke joins Willie Nelson on stage during his Turn out For Texas Rally, featuring a concert by Wille Nelson, in Austin, Texas on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

If an Instagram post falls in the middle of election, does it make a sound?

Celebrities got a lot of credit for their political moonlighting this campaign cycle, from Beto-mania to … well, Beto-mania. But let’s be honest: How much did they really do?