Nebraska

New Push for Senators to Pay Their Interns
Advocates say the time is right for offices to stop relying on free labor

A majority of Senate offices do not offer paid internships, according to data from nonprofit advocacy group Pay Our Interns. (Illustration by Chris Hale/CQ Roll Call)

Ideas to boost diversity on the Hill have been thrown around, and the numbers are slowly improving. But what if the solution was right in front of everyone, sitting at tiny shared desks in congressional offices?

Paid interns.

Tax Day Fight Previews Larger Political Battle Over New Law
Midterm messaging is likely to contain a heaping dose of tax rhetoric

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., holds a sample of a postcard-style tax filing during a news conference in the House studio after a meeting of the GOP Conference on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As citizens across the country rush to submit their 2017 tax returns before the deadline, Republicans and Democrats in Congress on Tuesday amped up the messaging battle over last year’s tax law.

The dueling talking points presented by each party are a preview of the months to come as the midterm elections approach.

Trump Could Flip-Flop on TPP After All
But Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse cautions that president ‘likes to blue-sky a lot’ in meetings

Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., said he was Thursday was pleased with President Trump’s willingness to possibly rejoin the Trans-Pacific Partnership — but he also presented a caveat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In what would be another dramatic reversal, President Donald Trump told farm-state lawmakers Thursday he might sign the United States up for the Trans-Pacific Partnership after all.

Just by floating the idea, the Republican president drew the ire of conservatives on social media as he opened the door to joining a trade pact with 11 other Pacific Rim countries that he once dubbed “a continuing rape of our country.” 

Nathan’s (Mostly) Political One-Liners: Florida, Curious George, and the NFL
What’s running through my head on Thursday, April 12

From left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Chief Deputy Whip Patrick T. McHenry, R-N.C., and Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., arrive in the basement of the Capitol on Wednesday as reports of Speaker Paul D. Ryan not running for re-election spread. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Arizona’s 8th District Special: Welcome to the big leagues, Democrat Hiral Tipirneni, who we’re learning hasn’t treated patients since 2011 and settled a malpractice lawsuit.

Baseball Movies: It’s still hard to believe Aaron Sorkin made “Moneyball” into a watchable movie.

Senators Face Off With Zuckerberg in Marathon Hearing
Joint hearing starts off with pop, brings unexpected questions, and then gradually fades

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified during the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee joint hearing Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

“Mr. Zuckerberg, would you be comfortable sharing with us the name of the hotel you stayed in last night?”

Senate Minority Whip Richard J. Durbin asked that of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg nearly two hours into Tuesday afternoon’s headline-grabbing Senate hearing.

Tariffs Could Complicate Key Senate Races
Some Democrats already criticizing GOP opponents over tariffs’ impact

A John Deere tractor sits in a field near Salem, Ind. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The potential for a trade war with China is already complicating some key Senate races ahead of the November midterms, especially for Republicans hoping to expand their majority.

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he would impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports sparked retaliatory threats from China. The country vowed to slap tariffs on top U.S. exports that also come from states with some of the most competitive Senate contests.

Cochran’s Scheduler Opened His First Office and Will Close His Last
Doris Wagley reflects on her 45 years working for the Mississippi Republican

Scheduler Doris Wagley is clearing out the Dirksen Building office of her longtime boss, Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran’, who resigned April 1. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Few people could claim seniority over former Sen. Thad Cochran. Doris Wagley, who was his scheduler since before he was sworn in to the House in 1973, is one of them.

“I showed up at 9 o’clock. He was there, but he didn’t take his oath in the House until 12 noon. So he started talking about me having three-hour seniority over him,” Wagley said.

Opinion: To Reinvent Rural Health Care, Ditch the ‘One-Size-Fits-All’ Model
Geography shouldn’t be an impediment to quality care

A man waits at a mobile clinic in Olean, New York, in June 2017. Rural communities should be given the flexibility to figure out a health care delivery system that works for them, Dorgan and Krutsick write. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images file photo)

As policymakers grapple over how to best deliver quality, affordable health care, they cannot ignore the unique challenges faced by the 46 million Americans living in rural areas.

Not only do rural residents rank worse than their urban counterparts on many health metrics such as obesity, tobacco usage and suicides, their communities also face shortages of health care workers and geographic challenges that make it more difficult to address these concerns.

Amid Mounting GOP Criticism, White House Shrugs Off Tariff Worries
Republican lawmakers increasingly uneasy, but Kudlow says trade war is last resort

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross has been among the big proponents of using tariffs to pressure China. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Amid mounting criticism from Republicans and usually GOP allies, White House chief economic adviser Lawrence Kudlow and other White House officials on Friday pushed back on the idea that President Donald Trump is starting a trade war with China. 

The Trump administration might present the Chinese government with a list of trade tactics changes it would like to see implemented as a result of the ongoing tariff proposal tit-for-tat, Kudlow told a group of reporters.

Sen. Thune Peeved at Trump Trade War, Eyes Hits To U.S. Agriculture
South Dakota senator joins chorus of GOP leaders upset with Trump over ‘lose-lose’ tariff battle

Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., left, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., have expressed frustration over President Donald Trump’s decision to enact tariffs, triggering retaliation from other countries against U.S. producers. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

South Dakota Sen. John Thune is the latest member of GOP leadership to voice his frustrations with the Trump administration over its decision to place tariffs on foreign aluminum and steel, igniting a trade war with China.

Chinese officials released a $50 billion sheet of American goods for possible tariff increases, including agricultural products — most importantly, soybeans — vital to the U.S. economy.