MD-06

David Trone, Largest Self-Funder in House History, Wins Democratic Nod in Maryland
Wine magnate has spent nearly $25 million of his money on two Maryland primaries

David Trone won the Democratic nomination in Maryland’s 6th District. (Courtesy David Trone campaign)

Wine magnate David Trone, who poured nearly $12 million of his own money into the primary for Maryland’s open 6th District, won the Democratic nomination Tuesday night.

With 96 percent of precincts reporting, Trone led the eight-way race with 41 percent of the vote when The Associated Press called the race. State Del. Aruna Miller was in second with 30 percent.

Can Aruna Miller Upset the Largest Self-Funder in House Race History?
Maryland hopeful has many of the credentials that have boosted Democratic women this year

Maryland state Del. Aruna Miller greets voters at an early polling place in Gaithersburg, Md, on June 18. She stands behind the electioneering line which prevents a candidate from being too close to a voting site. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

GAITHERSBURG, Md. — If there’s one electoral trend from 2018 so far, it’s that Democratic women are winning primaries in House districts across the country.

But in Maryland, which has no women in its congressional delegation for the first time in more than 40 years, the most competitive woman running for the Democratic nomination in the open 6th District is at a big disadvantage.

John Delaney Running for President in 2020
Maryland Democrat won't seek re-election to House

The field to replace Maryland Rep. John Delaney in 2018 is already crowded. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Maryland Democratic Rep. John Delaney announced Friday afternoon he’s running for president in 2020. He won’t run for re-election or for governor in 2018.

NRCC Goes After Blue-Collar Districts in 2018
GOP campaign arm releases list of 36 initial targets

Rep. Tim Walz speaks with guests during a campaign event in Duluth for fellow Minnesota Rep. Rick Nolan last fall. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee’s initial list of offensive targets for 2018 includes 36 Democrat-held districts, many in blue-collar areas of the country.

If Democrats are targeting the well-educated suburbs (see New Jersey’s 11th District, for example), where Donald Trump either barely won or underperformed, Republicans are going after many rural districts where Hillary Clinton underperformed the congressional ticket.