Mark Meadows

Too Long; Didn’t Read Act Aims to Cut Confusion for Entitlements Programs
Bipartisan bill would make federal agencies place instructions for applicants at top of letters and emails

Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., walks down the House steps following a vote on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For Americans who qualify for aid through federal programs, navigating the process to unlock those benefits is often stressful and confusing.

A constituent of Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton received a piece of mail from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs recently. The letter contained instructions on how to access his benefits — but they were buried at the bottom of a six-page letter mostly filled with bureaucratic balderdash. The man nearly glossed over the instructions telling him to upload his records on the VA’s website. Had he not read the letter carefully all the way through, he would have missed the most important part of the letter and possibly seen a delay receiving his VA benefits.

Omnibus Unlikely to Defund 'Sanctuary' Cities
Senate appropriator says it would make it too difficult to pass

Sen. John Boozman said it was unlikely the Senate would move to defund sanctuary cities, as House conservatives are pushing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A top Senate appropriator said Tuesday the final omnibus spending bill would likely not include a provision to defund “sanctuary” cities that do not cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows, R-N.C., suggested in two posts on Twitter that Congress should withhold federal grants for sanctuary cities in the omnibus. His remarks follow the Trump administration’s decision to sue California over three state immigration laws, escalating a battle over sanctuary jurisdictions that began shortly after President Donald Trump took office.

Photos of the Week: Jon Stewart, Benjamin Netanyahu, and an Adorable Office Morale Officer
The week of March 5 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

TV crews set up microphones at the House Triangle before the start of the press conference with comedian Jon Stewart on Monday to call on OMB Director Mick Mulvaney to withdraw his proposal to separate the World Trade Center Health Program from National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health direction. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The week of March 5 has nearly come to a close as Washington waits for a fiscal 2018 omnibus spending bill ahead of the March 23 government funding deadline.

Leaders say a bill could appear as early as next week, which could make for another busy week in D.C.

Porn Still Turning Up in the Federal Workplace Despite Ban
Congress made rules to block employees from watching porn. But will it act to enforce them?

North Carolina Rep. Walter B. Jones led the effort to expand a pornography ban as part of the 2017 omnibus. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s been six years since Congress began banning federal employees from watching pornography in the workplace. But even though lawmakers have gradually added the rule to spending bills, implementing it agency by agency, some workers are still pulling up porn — and some departments still aren’t covered.

As the spotlight on sexual exploitation intensifies in Washington and around the nation, it’s clear that the problem of online porn in the federal workplace hasn’t gone away.

House Republicans Want Trump to Curtail Tariff Plans, Avoid Legislation
Many in GOP want to avoid a ‘direct affront’ to the president, Sanford says

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady have urged President Donald Trump not to move forward with sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans want President Donald Trump to scale back his plan to institute sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports — apparently so they can avoid taking legislative action against him.

Speaker Paul D. Ryanis urging the president not to move on the plan he announced Thursday to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports. 

House Concealed-Carry Reciprocity Measure Still Roadblock to Gun Legislation
House GOP leadership not committing to decoupling concealed-carry measure from background check bill

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., holds the door as he arrives for the House GOP leadership press conference following the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A measure that would allow citizens with concealed-carry permits in one state to carry their guns into states with stricter gun laws looms as a roadblock for legislative action to bolster the criminal background check system for gun purchases.

The Republican-controlled House passed a bill in December mostly on party lines that attached the so-called concealed-carry reciprocity measure to the Senate’s “Fix-NICS” bill aimed at bolstering enforcement of the current federal background check system.

Supreme Court Declines to Step Into DACA Fight
Move means status of immigrants to remain in limbo for now

The Supreme Court declined to step into the fight over legal status for the so-called dreamers. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Supreme Court announced Monday it won’t immediately step into the legal fight over the Trump administration’s cancellation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

The move leaves in limbo nearly 700,000 “Dreamers” who arrived in the U.S. illegally as children since the Trump administration won’t be able to end the DACA program until the appeals move through the courts. That could take months — well past the March 5 deadline the government had set to wind down the program created by President Barack Obama in 2012.

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing on Capitol Hill?
Cornyn’s into sharing, and McCain gets a high-profile visitor

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., takes a picture with Olivia Confrey, 13, of New Jersey, during the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort in Oxon Hill, Md., on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. Some of the best are ones we come across while reporting the big stories.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Freedom Caucus Chairman: ‘If We Cave the American People Will Remember It’
Meadows says he’s not concerned about who the speaker is but GOP needs to ‘show real leadership’

House Freedom Caucus leaders Mark Meadows, R-N.C., left, and Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, are pushing their leadership to pass a conservative immigration bill. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

“Show real leadership.”

That was House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows’s message for House Republican leaders Friday, as he and former HFC chairman Jim Jordan took the stage at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference.

Trump at CPAC: ‘Lock Her Up,’ ‘The Snake’ — and Hiding the Bald Spot
Democrats want to ‘take away your Second Amendment,’ POTUS says

President Donald Trump arrives to address the Conservative Political Action Conference at the Gaylord National Resort in Oxon Hill, Mayland, on Friday. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The crowd chanted “lock her up!” Donald Trump gleefully veered off-script, saying his prepared speech was “a little boring.” He depicted undocumented immigrants as “the snake” that inevitably will deliver a “vicious bite” to American citizens.

And he told the crowd he tries “like hell” to hide a bald spot on his head.