Luke Messer

Report: Trump Campaign Demands Rokita Take Down Yard Signs
Say they give a false impression Trump endorsed Indiana Senate candidate

Rep. Todd Rokita, R-Ind., who is running for the Republican nomination for Senate in Indiana, addresses voters in South Bend, Indiana. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign said Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita’s campaign signs give the false impression that Trump endorsed his Senate candidacy.

Two people told The Associated Press that Trump’s campaign wants Rokita's campaign to take down the signs.

Inside the Antique Mall That’s Greg Pence’s Largest Asset
Vice president’s brother is running for Congress but seldom gives interviews

A worker arranges merchandise at the Exit 76 Antique Mall in Edinburgh, Ind., on April 6. The store is owned by Denise and Greg Pence, the latter a candidate for the Republican nomination for Indiana’s 6th District. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

EDINBURGH, Ind. — He’s not big on talking to the media, but if you want to see Indiana congressional candidate Greg Pence, the brother of the vice president, the Exit 76 Antique Mall here may be a good place to look.

Along with another smaller antique mall in nearby Bloomington, this 72,000-square-foot mall is Pence’s largest asset. The warehouse-like building carries everything from a $10 U.S. Capitol porcelain plate to an $800 barbecue bull that lets smoke out of its nose, with plenty of Elvis figurines, costume jewelry, knives and grandfather clocks stuffed in between.

Todd Rokita on the Most Important Part of His Driving Memo
Roll Call rides with Indiana Republican as he campaigns for Senate

Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita talks with guests at the Kosciusko County Republican Fish Fry in Warsaw, Ind., on April 4. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita has a reputation for driving hundreds of miles a day during his statewide Senate campaigns.

The day this reporter was with him last week, the Republican lawmaker was on track to put 500 miles on his unmarked white Chevrolet Tahoe, a surplus police vehicle he bought for the campaign. (He went with Crown Victorias for his two earlier campaigns for Indiana secretary of state.) 

Indiana’s Braun Brothers Keep Their Distance on the Campaign Trail
Mike is running for Senate; Steve is running for the House

Former Indiana state Rep. Mike Braun, who is running for Senate, talks with patrons of Bekah’s Westside Cafe in Lebanon, Ind., on April 4. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

LEBANON, Ind. — If it weren’t for the last name and a slight physical resemblance, it’d be easy to forget that Mike and Steve Braun — both running for federal office in Indiana this year — are brothers. 

Mike is seeking the Republican Senate nomination. Steve is bidding for the GOP nod in the open 4th District, which Rep. Todd Rokita is vacating to run for Senate. 

Indiana Republicans Hope to Imitate Trump’s Success in Senate Primary
Early voting for May 8 primary starts Tuesday

Indiana Rep. Luke Messer, who is running for Senate, talks with Jean and Jim Northenor at the Kosciusko County Republican Fish Fry in Warsaw, Ind., on April 4. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

WARSAW, Ind. — Nine-dollar all-you-can-eat fried Alaska pollock brings out hungry Hoosiers — and plenty of politicians.

At last week’s Kosciusko County fish fry, a biennial fundraiser for the local GOP, all three Republican Senate candidates in Indiana worked the room of long communal tables laden with campaign literature.

Tariffs Could Complicate Key Senate Races
Some Democrats already criticizing GOP opponents over tariffs’ impact

A John Deere tractor sits in a field near Salem, Ind. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The potential for a trade war with China is already complicating some key Senate races ahead of the November midterms, especially for Republicans hoping to expand their majority.

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he would impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports sparked retaliatory threats from China. The country vowed to slap tariffs on top U.S. exports that also come from states with some of the most competitive Senate contests.

Luke Messer Launches Second TV Ad in Indiana Senate Primary
Positive spot features GOP lawmaker as son’s basketball coach

Indiana Rep. Luke Messer is releasing the second TV ad of his Senate campaign on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Luke Messer is launching Thursday his second TV ad in the Indiana Republican Senate primary.

The ad, shared first with Roll Call, features the congressman in his role as coach for his son’s fifth grade basketball team and is timed to air during the start of March Madness, the NCAA’s men’s basketball tournament. It’s backed by a cable and broadcast TV and digital buy in the mid six-figures.

Congress Warns North Korea — and Trump — on Nuke Talks
Messer says Trump deserves a Nobel Prize

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said President Donald Trump's position on North Korea gave an opportunity for diplomacy with North Korea. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Members of Congress were cautious in response to the news that President Donald Trump will meet with Kim Jong Un to discuss North Korea’s nuclear program.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, a hawkish Republican who went from being a major Trump critic to ally, said Trump’s “strong stand” against the regime gives the United States the best opportunity for peace.

Todd Rokita Launches His First TV Ad in Indiana Senate Primary
Ad by self-identified “pro-Trump” candidate attacks the “liberal elites”

Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita is airing his first TV ad of the Senate primary on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Indiana Rep. Todd Rokita’s Senate campaign is hitting the airwaves Wednesday with its first TV ad before the May 8 primary. 

The ad, obtained first by Roll Call, opens with a short clip of former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton and launches into an attack on “liberal elites” who “disrespect our flag” and “riot in our streets.”

Senators Warn Union Case Risks Supreme Court’s Reputation
Conservative high court majority appears likely to rule against unions

Indiana Rep. Luke Messer speaks at a rally outside the Supreme Court on Jan. 11, 2015, as the court heard arguments in a case involving 10 California teachers who said they had a First Amendment right not to pay fees to a union. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Supreme Court appears set to overturn a decades-old precedent and deal a financial blow to Democratic-aligned unions that represent teachers and other public-sector employees in a major case with blatant political overtones.

Ahead of oral arguments Monday, two Democratic senators sent the justices this message: The Supreme Court’s reputation is at stake, and overturning the 1977 ruling will further erode the public’s confidence that the federal courts are neutral and above politics.