Lucille Roybal-Allard

Pelosi: To woo Trump, border aid will likely be attached to disaster bill
Adding a border-related element to the disaster relief bill could garner the Trump administration’s support

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., holds her weekly press conference in the Capitol on May 16, 2019. She told reporters that a disaster aid package will likely include humanitarian assistance to address the surge of migrants across the southern border. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

An emerging multibillion-dollar disaster aid package will likely include humanitarian assistance to address the surge of migrants across the southern border, an element that could garner the Trump administration’s support.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Thursday that lawmakers are planning to add funding to the unreleased package that would help stem the “humanitarian crisis.”

House Democrats telegraph policy priorities in Capitol Hill funding
Comparison of previous GOP, current Dem spending choices show differences

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., attends a news conference with House Democrats on March 12 to introduce the “Dream and Promise Act.” The new majority’s Legislative Branch Appropriations bill would allow Dreamers to get jobs on Capitol Hill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Empowered by their control of the House, Democrats are telegraphing their policy priorities in how they plan to spend taxpayer dollars on Capitol Hill, including exploring student debt relief options and employing Dreamers in Congress.

The fiscal 2020 House Legislative Branch Appropriations bill is signaling what types of issues Democrats want to be talking about and working on, both for their constituents back home and right here on Capitol Hill.

House spending panel advances measure boosting congressional funding

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, who chairs the Legislative Branch Appropriations Subcommittee, offered amendments to boost Members Representational Allowances. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Appropriations Committee advanced a $3.97 billion fiscal 2020 Legislative Branch spending measure Thursday, following tension over total funding levels and the absence of a final budget agreement.

The panel voted 28-22 to report the draft bill to the floor, which would provide $164 million more than enacted fiscal 2019 levels.

White House Asks for $4.5 Billion Border Aid; Democrats Balk
The supplemental request doesn’t seek wall money, but Democrats may push for immigration policy changes they called harsh

Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, named chairman of the Special Committee On Climate Change, participates in the press conference in the Capitol on the formation of the committee on March 27, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Trump administration on Wednesday requested an extra $4.5 billion to address the surge of migrants at the U.S. southern border, in a move that could trigger a fresh round of criticism over President Donald Trump’s immigration policies.

The supplemental request stops short of seeking additional money for a border wall, which Democrats have staunchly opposed. But Democrats are sure to press for changes to immigration policy they consider too harsh.

New budget request for border crisis could come this week
Some funding would be for migrant processing facilities

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan says the White House is planning to send Congress a supplemental funding request to address the high volume of migrants arriving at the southern border. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan told lawmakers Tuesday that the White House is planning to send Congress a supplemental funding request this week to address the high volume of migrants arriving at the southern border.

“The supplemental funding request will address critical humanitarian requirements and help ensure that the crisis is managed in an operationally effective, humane and safe manner,” McAleenan said.

Road Ahead: Budget week, sending a Mueller message, Senate vote on termination resolution
Committees will be particularly busy ahead of St. Patrick's Day recess.

House Democrats want the report of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to be released to Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats intend to send a message this week that the full report of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III should be sent to Capitol Hill and released.

So for the second week in a row, a nonbinding resolution will be among the headliners on the House floor. The Rules Committee is scheduled to meet Monday evening on the concurrent resolution introduced by House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York, with the backing of other Democratic chairmen.

Democrats to reintroduce Dream Act on March 12 with TPS and DED protections
Roybal-Allard, Velázquez, Clarke to roll out measure with party leaders

Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., will on March 12 reintroduce the Dream Act, a bill to provide a path to citizenship for young undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. The legislation will have some changes from prior versions. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats on March 12 will reintroduce the Dream Act with new language providing protections for Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Enforced Departure recipients. 

California Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard will reintroduce the measure — which provides permanent legal protections and a path to citizenship for so-called Dreamers, undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children — as the Dream and Promise Act of 2019, according to her office. 

Ocasio-Cortez, other female progressive freshmen will vote against border deal
Ocasio-Cortez, Omar, Pressley and Tlaib have called for ending DHS funding, but the deal includes an increase

Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, left, and Ilhan Omar attend a rally on Feb. 7 on the East Front of the Capitol to call on Congress to defund Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, Ayanna S. Pressley and Rashida Tlaib will vote against the massive spending measure agreed to by a bipartisan conference committee because they oppose an increase in funding to the Department of Homeland Security.

“This Administration continues to threaten the dignity and humanity of our immigrant population,” the lawmakers said in a press release Thursday. “The Department of Homeland Security does not deserve an increase in funding, and that is why we intend to vote no on this funding package.”

Hannity blasts border security deal: ‘Well, that is insane’
Fox News host who was influential on Trump’s decision to reject December deal calls new one a ‘garbage compromise’

Fox News Channel and radio talk show host Sean Hannity interviews President Donald Trump before a campaign rally in Las Vegas in September 2018. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images file photo)

Fox News host Sean Hannity blasted a preliminary agreement reached by budget negotiators Monday night, which could spell trouble for securing the support of President Donald Trump.

A conference committee comprised of Republicans and Democrats announced late Monday that they had reached “an agreement in principle” on border security spending, including $1.375 billion for physical barriers along the southern border, possibly averting another government shutdown days before appropriations run dry.

Appropriators attempt to revive talks Monday as Friday shutdown deadline looms
A meeting between 4 top appropriations leaders from the House and Senate is expected at 3:30 p.m.

From left, Senate Appropriations chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., House Appropriations chairwoman Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., House Appropriations ranking member Kay Granger, R-Texas, and Senate Appropriations ranking member Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., talk before the start of the Homeland Security Appropriations Conference Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republican and Democratic appropriators from both chambers plan to meet Monday afternoon in an effort to revive spending talks as the government heads toward its second shutdown in three months.

The so-called “four corners” — Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard C. Shelby, R-Ala., and ranking member Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., and House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey, D- N.Y. and ranking member Kay Granger, R-Texas, — will attend the meeting, according to a Shelby spokeswoman.