Leadership

David Hawkings' Whiteboard: How Congress' Schedule Works
 

Taxpayers Foot Bill for Boehner's Post-Speaker Office

Boehner gets a standing ovation before his farewell address. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 6:10 p.m. | Looking for John A. Boehner? Try the Longworth House Office Building.  

The former House speaker, whose resignation from Congress became effective over the weekend, is taking advantage of little-known perks and privileges taxpayers provide by law to those vacating the chamber's highest office. Boehner is setting up a government-funded office that may have as many as three aides with salaries of more than $100,000 each.  

It's All in the Family for Ryan on Speaker Day

Ryan with his wife, kids and mom at the 2012 Republican national convention. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated 12:45 p.m. | It was a job he said he didn’t want — largely because of the toll it may take on his family.  

But as Paul D. Ryan claimed the speaker’s gavel, that is who surrounded him: His wife, Janna; their three kids: 13-year-old Liza, 12-year-old Charlie and 10-year-old Sam; his mother; siblings; and “more cousins than I can count on a few hands,” the Wisconsin Republican noted in his first words to the House chamber.  

Ryan Staffing Up for Speaker's Office

(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

If he's elected speaker Thursday, Paul D. Ryan plans to name David Hoppe — a man best known around the Capitol for his Senate experience — to be his chief of staff.  

Hoppe is a lobbyist who has worked as a chief of staff on both sides of the Rotunda. Most notably, Hoppe has worked under senators including Majority Leader Trent Lott of Mississippi and Minority Whip Jon Kyl of Arizona. Like his new boss, Hoppe is a die-hard Green Bay Packers fan and fellow shareholder. "Dave has been a foot soldier in the conservative movement, and he is a good friend," Ryan said in a statement Sunday. "His decades of experience fighting for the cause and his passionate commitment to conservative principles are just what I’m looking for to create a new kind of speakership."  

Obama, Ryan Must Find Common Ground Soon

Ryan will seek the House speakership. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call)

There could be little President Barack Obama can do to find common ground with Paul D. Ryan, given their deep ideological differences and House conservatives’ inevitable demands for the speaker-in-waiting.  

With Ryan's announcement that he will seek the speakership, all eyes now turn to the Wisconsin Republican's ability to manage his fractious caucus and find just enough common ground with a president many conservatives revile. Ryan will have little time to settle in because of some fast-approaching fiscal deadlines. Congressional leaders must find a way in coming weeks to avoid a potentially catastrophic debt default, then see if they can strike a long-term budget deal.  

Congressional Hits and Misses: Best of Paul Ryan (Video)

As the House searches for its next speaker, HOH pays tribute this week to one candidate with a vast knowledge of time, cheese and NFL rules.

What's Next for John Boehner’s Staff?

Boehner may be leaving office, but what does it mean for his staff? (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Many things will change in the House when Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, resigns at the end of October, including employment prospects of his current staff.  

According to information from LegiStorm, 67 people are listed on Boehner’s personal and leadership office payroll, most of whom will be actively looking for new positions (several are shared staff). Come Nov. 1, a handful of staffers will be retained to handle constituent casework and answer phones for the “Office of the 8th District of Ohio.” Aides can still provide constituent services, though the office is forbidden from taking on legislative work. Staffers may keep those jobs until a new member is sworn in, and he or she will decide who stays and who goes.