Justin Amash

An ‘obvious trap’? Democrats weigh political cost of impeachment
Vulnerable Democrats may be more open to impeachment but aren’t ready to go there yet

Democrat strategists who’ve worked on competitive House races largely agree that impeachment is a losing issue for the party trying to hold the House in 2020. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congressional Democrats have a decision to make: Where are they going on impeachment, and at what political cost?

A group that has been pushing since 2017 for President Donald Trump’s impeachment will be airing ads this weekend in Iowa and New Hampshire urging Democratic leaders to take action. 

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What Justin Amash can teach Nancy Pelosi
When it comes to impeachment, congressional Democrats are missing the point

While Justin Amash is going out on a limb, Nancy Pelosi is parsing words. The contrast is striking, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams and Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photos)

OPINION — At worst, Justin Amash will be the answer to a trivia question about which House member bucked a president of his own party to call for impeachment. At best, Amash will someday be hailed as prescient in trying to save the Republican Party from being Donald Trump’s devoted, yet unprincipled, enablers.

Amash’s decision to endorse impeachment was prompted (as he tweeted) by being a rare legislator who actually read the Mueller report. And as a dedicated libertarian who has been a longtime Trump critic, this lonely position fits Amash’s political persona.

After backing impeachment, Rep. Amash gets pro-Trump primary challenger
State lawmaker says five-term Amash is ‘out of touch’ with voters

Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., walks up the House steps for a vote in the Capitol on Thursday, May 9, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A Michigan state lawmaker has announced plans to challenge Rep. Justin Amash in the Republican primary for the state’s 3rd District after the congressman broke with his party on impeaching President Donald Trump.

State Rep. Jim Lower, who describes himself on his campaign website as a “Pro-Trump” Republican, said in a statement that Amash “must be replaced, and I am going to do it.”

Rep. Justin Amash considers Libertarian challenge to Trump
‘The tea party is largely gone. It was replaced with ... the general philosophy of the party now under Trump’

Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., has expressed disenchantment with the Freedom Caucus he helped found. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Libertarian Party has urged Rep. Justin Amash to consider mounting a third-party challenge to President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election.

The Michigan Republican told his hometown paper that while he would not “rule out” a bid, he has not completely “thought through” his plans.

‘We are either a team or we’re not’ — Democrats struggle with Republican messaging votes
Pelosi wants Democrats to stay unified against GOP moves but moderates worry about political attacks

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., wants her party to stay unified on minority procedural tools that can be used to divide the majority party. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The new House Democratic majority is having its first major family disagreement as the caucus struggles to stay united against Republican messaging votes, which the minority is deploying through a procedural move known as a motion to recommit. 

Republicans in their first two months in the minority have already won two motions to recommit because of Democratic defections. Not once during the past eight years in which Republicans held the majority did Democrats win a motion to recommit. 

Michael Cohen proves that a bad person can be a good witness
Trump’s former fixer dropped more breadcrumbs than Hansel and Gretel

Michael Cohen came across as weak, lost lapdog. But he was also a convincing witness, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — There was something sad and delusional about Michael Cohen’s insistence during a riveting day of testimony before the House Oversight and Reform Committee that he remains, despite it all, a “good person.”

During his 30-minute opening statement, Cohen declared, in a passage that came close to defying the internal logic of the English language, “I have lied. But I am not a liar. And I have done bad things, but I am not a bad man. I have fixed things, but I am no longer your fixer, Mr. Trump.”

House disapproves of Trump’s emergency declaration on border
But the vote was far from a veto-proof supermajority

Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro introduced the resolution of disapproval and helped shepherd its passage. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House passed legislation Tuesday disapproving of President Donald Trump’s border security emergency declaration but came up well short of the two-thirds margin that would be needed to overcome a Trump veto.

The 245-182 vote sends the joint resolution to the Senate, where it should get expedited consideration.

Here are the 13 Republicans who rebuked Trump over his national emergency
President wants to fund a wall at the U.S.-Mexico border

Democrats are targeting Washington Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler in 2020. The congresswoman was among 13 Republicans who voted for the Democrats’ disapproval resolution Tuesday evening. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Thirteen Republicans rebuked President Donald Trump on Tuesday, supporting a Democratic effort to block his national emergency declaration to fund a wall at the U.S.-Mexico border.

A resolution of disapproval to overturn Trump’s move passed the House by a vote of 245-182, with almost every Democrat and 13 Republicans supporting the measure. Trump declared a national emergency earlier this month when Congress failed to meet his request of $8 billion for a barrier along the southern border. Lawmakers allocated nearly $1.4 billion for 55 miles of barriers in a recent government funding bill.

Border wall technology: Better than concrete, or Big Brother of the borderlands?
As defense startups peddle their wares, privacy activists worry

A fence marking the U.S.-Mexico border is seen at sunset on July 22, 2018, in Nogales, Arizona. Defense startups are betting that demand for a “technological wall” will only grow. (John Moore/Getty Images file photo)

Democratic support for installing hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of surveillance technology on the U.S.-Mexico border, billed by party leaders as a 21st-century alternative to President Donald Trump’s medieval wall, is worrying privacy activists at the same time that it excites nascent defense startups.

Amid staunch opposition by Democrats, the fiscal 2019 omnibus package signed into law by Trump earlier this month contained only $1.4 billion for wall and barrier construction. That’s compared with about $100 million for sensor towers and remote video surveillance systems, plus an additional $564 million for nonintrusive scanning equipment at border entry points, which was also included.