Jeff Sessions

Opinion: Strange Times for Mitch McConnell in the Alabama Senate Race
A Moore victory could be a big headache for the Senate majority leader

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has become the Nancy Pelosi of the right, Murphy writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

When President Donald Trump tapped Sen. Jeff Sessions to be his attorney general last year, the last thing on anyone’s mind was what would happen to the Alabama Senate seat that Sessions would leave behind. With a Republican governor in a reliably Republican state, the assumption was that the governor would appoint a safe placeholder for the seat, who would then easily get elected to finish out Sessions’ term in the next election.

But fast forward nine months, and the Alabama governor who appointed that placeholder has resigned in disgrace. The placeholder, Sen. “Big” Luther Strange, finished second in the GOP primary to former state Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, who has been removed from the bench twice.

Strange and Allies Overwhelming Moore in TV Ad Spending
One week to go in competitive Alabama Senate special primary

Sen. Luther Strange, R-Ala., speaks with a supporter after the U.S. Senate candidate forum held by the Shelby County Republican Party in Pelham,  Alabama, in early August. Sen. Strange is running in the special election to fill the seat vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sen. Luther Strange and allies are dramatically outspending Roy Moore and friends on television in the special Republican primary in Alabama.

With a week to go before the runoff, Moore is leading the appointed senator by a couple points or more, depending on the poll.

Mo Brooks Announces He Voted for Roy Moore in Alabama GOP Runoff
Congressman endorses former primary rival over Sen. Luther Strange

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks is backing former primary rival Roy Moore in the state’s Senate GOP runoff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republican Rep. Mo Brooks on Saturday called on his supporters to rebuke the GOP establishment and vote for former Judge Roy Moore in the Alabama Senate primary runoff.

“I have voted for Roy Moore because Roy Moore not only stands with America, he will fight for America! I urge you to join that fight,” he told a rally in Huntsville, Alabama.

Booker Tacks Toward Democratic Party’s Base
Liberals eye New Jersey senator warily over ties to Wall Street and drug companies

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker speaks Wednesday during Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders’ event to introduce the so-called Medicare for All Act of 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker worked on burnishing his liberal credentials on economic and health care policy this week, which could appeal to his Democratic Party’s skeptical base. 

The first-term senator is considered among the many potential Democrats in the chamber who could run for president in 2020. But liberals are wary of him because of what they see as his ties to financial industries.

Opinion: The Terror Within — Those Who See Danger in Diversity
Focus should be on bringing America together

White nationalists and neo-Nazis exchange insults with counterprotesters on Aug. 12 in Charlottesville, Va. Americans are eager to fight foreign enemies but they often ignore signs of terror from within, Curtis writes. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images File Photo)

It was a stirring message of unity. On Monday, 16 years after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on American soil that saw planes flown into the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, and brave passengers divert one into a Pennsylvania field, President Donald Trump honored the memories of the dead and the heroics woven through the actions of so many.

At a 9/11 commemoration ceremony at the Pentagon, Trump recalled that moment: “On that day, not only did the world change, but we all changed. Our eyes were opened to the depths of the evil we face. But in that hour of darkness, we also came together with renewed purpose. Our differences never looked so small, our common bonds never felt so strong.”

Trump and Sessions: In a Relationship — and It’s Complicated
Strife with presidents is common for post-Watergate AGs

Attorney General Jeff Sessions was one of President  Donald Trump’s early supporters. But their relationship has become more complicated. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

When Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced last week that the Trump administration would end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, he was also signaling a new act in one of the summer’s most riveting political dramas. 

Sessions had been considered a dead man walking since mid-July, when Trump began berating him in interviews and on social media for his decision to recuse himself from the investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Yet here he was, on a podium, serving as a proxy for the president as he announced a controversial policy decision that Sessions has sought for years — and on which Trump was reportedly wavering. 

Trump’s Voter Fraud Panel Remains Lightning Rod
Some see commission as Washington’s most dangerous advisory board

President Donald Trump, flanked by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and Vice President Mike Pence speaks during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in Washington in July. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images File Photo)

If anyone in Washington was wondering just how seriously Democrats were taking a presidential advisory commission tasked with finding voter fraud, the answer came in late August, when Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer compared the commission with the white supremacists and neo-Nazis who clashed with counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, earlier in the month.

“If the president wants to truly show that he rejects the discrimination agenda of the white supremacist movement, he will rescind the Executive Order that created this commission,” the New York Democrat wrote in a post on Medium.com. He added that the commission was “a ruse,” whose “only intention is to disenfranchise voters.”

Trump Sides With Dems as Debt, Spending Deals Struck
Sources: President rejected debt ceiling ideas pitched by GOP leaders

Now-Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., arrive for a ceremony at the Capitol last year. On Wednesday, they met with President Trump about the fall legislative agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Updated at 2:32 p.m. | President Donald Trump, embroiled in a simmering feud with his own Republican Party, instead essentially cut a deal Wednesday with Democratic leaders on a number of pressing issues.

Trump agreed to back a three-month debt-limit extension and three-month continuing resolution attached to a Hurricane Harvey relief package, one source with knowledge of the meeting told CQ Roll Call.

Meadows Endorses Roy Moore in Alabama Senate Race
Freedom Caucus chairman chooses former state Supreme Court justice over appointed Sen. Strange

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, announced his support for former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore in the Alabama Senate race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Schiff Says Republicans Trying to Discredit Mueller Investigation
Nunes signed letter seeking to subpoena FBI, Justice over salacious Trump dossier

Rep. Adam B. Schiff, D-Calif., said Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee did not consult Democratic members before issuing subpoenas for the FBI and Justice Department. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Adam B. Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, accused Republicans on the committee of trying to discredit special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Schiff made the accusation on MSNBC’s “Rachel Maddow Show” Tuesday night after the Washington Examiner reported that the Intelligence Committee subpoenaed the Justice Department and the FBI regarding a dossier that had allegedly salacious details about President Donald Trump.