Jeff Sessions

Photos of the Week: Taxes Dominate, Bible Museum Opens and Trump Visits
The week of Nov. 13 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Virginia Rep. Scott Taylor sits on the House steps to shoot a selfie video about his vote on the tax overhaul Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Taxes once again dominated action on the Hill, with the Senate Finance Committee marking up its plan while the House passed its version of a tax overhaul by a 227-205 vote Thursday. 

Moore Jabs at McConnell for Franken Response
Says he received harsher treatment than Minnesota Senator

Alabama Republican Senate nominee Roy Moore, criticized Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for having a harsher response to allegations of his sexual misconduct than to accusations about Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore criticized Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for being harsher on him than on Sen. Al Franken.

Moore’s words come as Sen. Al Frankenwas accused by Los Angeles morning radio host Leann Tweeden of kissing and groping her without her consent

Ivey Quashes Idea of Strange Resigning Early to Block Roy Moore
Alabama governor says special election will go forward as planned Dec. 12

Alabama Sen. Luther Strange has said he does not intend to resign early. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has rejected the idea that Sen. Luther Strange could resign his Senate seat, sparking a new special election and potentially blocking Roy Moore from being elected to the Senate. 

National Republican leaders have called on Moore to step aside as the GOP nominee following allegations of sexual misconduct and assault. Politico reported Wednesday that one idea GOP leaders have contemplated is having Strange resign his seat so Ivey could set a new special election. Strange was appointed to the seat in February when Sen. Jeff Sessions resigned to become attorney general. 

Alabama GOP Appears to Still Support Roy Moore
Party steering committee met for more than three hours Wednesday

Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Alabama Republican Party will reportedly continue to support Roy Moore as allegations of sexual misconduct rock the Senate contest.

NBC News first reported that the state GOP would maintain its support for Moore, its Senate nominee and a former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, after the steering committee met Wednesday night. It is too late to remove his name from the ballot. But the party does have the option of formally withdrawing Moore as its nominee for the seat vacated by former Sen. Jeff Sessions, meaning votes for him in the Dec. 12 special election would not be counted. 

Word on the Hill: What’s Buzzing Around the Capitol
Kellyanne sighting, Congressional Baseball Game date set, and be on the lookout for John Cleese’s diary

Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas, takes a picture during a Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

We’re all over Capitol Hill and its surrounding haunts looking for good stories. And some of the best ones are those that we come across while reporting the big ones.

There is life beyond legislating, and this is the place for those stories. We look for them, but we don’t find them all. We want to know what you see, too.

Four Senate Stories That Might Shape Moore’s Fate
Past election and ethics controversies offer precedent for GOP

Those who hope to block Moore from the Senate might look to the paths pursued by, clockwise from top left, Robert G. Torricelli, John Ensign, Roland W. Burris and Lisa Murkowski. (Douglas Graham, Scott J. Farrell and Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photos)

Torricelli, Murkowski, Burris & Ensign: That’s not the newest lobbying law firm on K Street, but rather a roster of senators whose extraordinary political careers point toward the four tough paths for Republicans intent on keeping Roy Moore out of the Senate.

The lateness of the electoral hour, combined with Alabama’s deeply red nature and solid support from the state’s GOP base, continue to afford the 70-year-old, twice-removed chief justice of the state Supreme Court big advantages if he persists in his campaign — notwithstanding allegations that while he was a prosecutor in his 30s he sexually assaulted two teenage girls and pursued romantic relationships with others.

Sessions Defends His Reputation in First House Testimony
“I will not accept, and reject accusations I have ever lied”

Attorney General Jeff Sessions arrives to testify before a House Judiciary hearing Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions vigorously defended himself Tuesday against “false charges” that he was untruthful in previous testimony about his role in Donald Trump’s presidential campaign and any connections to Russian operatives.

“I will not accept, and reject accusations I have ever lied,” Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing stretching for five-and-a-half hours. “That is a lie.”

Senate Republicans Weigh Next Steps for Roy Moore
Some said there isn’t much more they can do to pressure Moore to step aside

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Republicans are examining options to block Roy Moore from the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that Republicans were examining options to prevent Roy Moore from becoming a U.S. senator. But some GOP senators acknowledged there isn’t much more they can do with Moore refusing to step aside. 

GOP lawmakers have called on Moore to withdraw his nomination in the special election for the seat vacated by now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions following a bombshell Washington Post story. The Post reported that four women accused Moore of sexual advances while they were teenagers and he was in his thirties. Another woman said Monday that Moore sexually assaulted her when she was 16 years old. 

Rating Change: Alabama Senate Race Moves to Toss-Up
One month out, Moore allegations could cost GOP a Senate seat

Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Roy Moore is testing a once-hypothetical question: What would it take for a Democrat to win a statewide race in Alabama?

Under normal circumstances, Alabama would elect a Republican to the Senate, even a candidate as polarizing as the former state Supreme Court chief justice. But the situation changed when The Washington Post reported allegations of Moore’s past sexual misconduct. This is no longer a normal election.

Sessions Fits Alabama Senate Write-In Mold, McConnell Says
More GOP leaders calling for Moore to stand down amid allegations

Attorney General Jeff Sessions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions “fits the mold” of someone who could win a write-in campaign, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday as more congressional Republicans call for Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore to step aside.

The Kentucky Republican said he has spoken to the White House about the race, but was skeptical a GOP candidate could win without being on the ballot.