Jackie Walorski

Roll Call’s 2018 March Madness — And the Winners Are …
Two Republicans claim the top spots in men‘s and women’s tournaments

Republican Reps. Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania and Jackie Walorski of Indiana are the winners of Roll Call’s 2018 March Madness tournaments. (Bill Clark/Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photos)

Two Republicans have won the 2018 Roll Call March Madness tournaments. With the Villanova Wildcats’ 79–62 victory over the University of Michigan Wolverines on Monday night, Rep. Patrick Meehan is the winner of this year’s men’s tournament.

The Pennsylvania Republican joins Indiana Rep. Jackie Walorski, winner of the women’s tournament after the Notre Dame Fighting Irish’s win over the Mississippi State Bulldogs on Sunday, as the bosses of this year’s brackets.

Roll Call’s 2018 March Madness — Championship Monday
Notre Dame tops women’s tournament ahead of tonight’s men’s final

Notre Dame beat Mississippi State in the women’s NCAA basketball championship game Sunday night, and Republican Rep. Jackie Walorski, who represents Indiana’s 2nd District where the Fighting Irish are located, is the winner of Roll Call’s 2018 women’s tournament.

Roll Call’s 2018 March Madness — The Final Four
Four Republicans and four Democrats left standing

We are down to the final four teams in both the men’s and women’s NCAA basketball tournaments. 

House Republicans Want Trump to Curtail Tariff Plans, Avoid Legislation
Many in GOP want to avoid a ‘direct affront’ to the president, Sanford says

Speaker Paul D. Ryan and Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady have urged President Donald Trump not to move forward with sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans want President Donald Trump to scale back his plan to institute sweeping tariffs on steel and aluminum imports — apparently so they can avoid taking legislative action against him.

Speaker Paul D. Ryanis urging the president not to move on the plan he announced Thursday to impose a 25 percent tariff on steel imports and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports. 

Take Five: Karen Handel
‘One of the greatest moments ever’ was when Donny Osmond called her about Mitt Romney

Rep. Karen Handel, R-Ga., says there’s a Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde syndrome in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman Rep. Karen Handel, 55, a Georgia Republican, talks about her friendship with Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, her intense race for the House and her love of football. 

Q: What has surprised you so far about Congress?

Limiting Sexual Harassment Payouts ‘Complicated,’ Lawmakers Say
Funding limitation could be one response to sexual misconduct scandals roiling Capitol Hill

Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., said using the appropriations process to restrict settlement payouts was complex. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated, 4:05 p.m. | Lawmakers have been quick to express their disgust with sexual harassment payments that come out of federal coffers to cover the cost of elected officials’ behavior. But members are more guarded when asked whether they would take action by attaching a funding limitation to a spending bill — a common instrument used by lawmakers in appropriations.

Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma, a top Republican appropriator, sounded cautious after last week’s revelation that the Office of Compliance has doled out tens of thousands of dollars since 2013.

As Tax Overhaul Looms, Senate Has Upper Hand
House GOP wary of Senate’s leverage given the narrow vote margin there

The Senate’s narrow margin on the tax overhaul provides it with some leverage in conference negotiations with the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate’s passage of a tax overhaul illustrated a fragile coalition of support that ironically provides the chamber with the upper hand headed into conference committee negotiations with the House.

House Republicans wanted a conference process on the two chambers’ differing tax bills to prevent the House from getting jammed by the Senate, as they acknowledge has happened frequently on major bills.

Proposed Measure Would Prevent Harassment Settlements Using Office Funds
Conyers revelations came from documents suggesting he paid a settlement with Hill account

Rep. Jackie Walorski, R-Ind. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Legislation introduced Friday would prevent sexual harassment and misconduct settlements from being paid out of members’ office budgets.

The measure introduced by GOP Rep. Jackie Walorski of Indiana comes after sexual misconduct allegations against Rep. John Conyers were first brought to light through documents related to a wrongful dismissal complaint he settled with a former employee who had claimed she was fired for rejecting Conyer’s sexual advances. The employee, Marion Brown, was paid $27,000 in wages from Conyer’s office budget after being fired.

For Joe Donnelly, a Long History of Bucking His Party
Indiana Democrat faces challenging re-election, which is also nothing new

Sen. Joe Donnelly often goes his own way on hot-button policy positions, and has since his time in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — The fate of Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly’s re-election bid next year may lie in his ability to convince Hoosiers he’s not always on the same page as the national Democratic Party. Fortunately for him, he has a lot of practice, and has been highly successful at it, going back more than a dozen years.

“The party occasionally gets mad, I really don’t care,” said one of the Democrats’ most endangered incumbents.

Word on the Hill: Capitol Hill Could Save You Money
Ryan in New Hampshire, Williams at nonprofit, Murphy’s march continues

Save some money, move to Capitol Hill. Above, Tennessee’s David Kustoff arrives at the Capitol Hill Hotel for new member orientation on Nov. 14, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Here’s some good news for congressional staffers: Capitol Hill was ranked the fourth best place in D.C. to save money if you’re living off an annual salary of $50,000.

The financial planning app Rize released a list of the 14 best and worst places to live in D.C. on a $50,000 salary. Petworth, NoMa and Southwest Waterfront ranked first, second and third, respectively. Georgetown was ranked last.