Iran

The Investigation Will Be Televised
Ken Buck was 27 years old when he staffed the Iran-Contra investigation. Now he could ‘never be a tyrant’

Rep. Ken Buck, R-Colo., left, worked for then-Rep. Dick Cheney, R-Wyo., right, as a counsel on the Iran-Contra Investigation. (Courtesy Ken Buck)

As his father watched him from a hospital bed, 27-year-old Ken Buck sat behind Dick Cheney while history was being made.

The Colorado Republican was the assistant minority counsel on the Iran-Contra investigation, working for Cheney, then a Wyoming congressman.

They’re Crying in the Cyber Wilderness
Attacking American institutions has become a lot simpler since 9/11

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats spent the summer warning that a democracy-withering cyberattack is “just one click of the keyboard away.” Is anyone listening? (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

Seventeen summers ago, 19 men had to make their way physically into the country, train to fly planes while avoiding scrutiny, and then crash them into buildings in order to pull off a devastating attack on a superpower.

In the years since then, attacking the United States and its institutions has become a lot simpler: a few strokes on a keyboard can now disrupt elections or shut off a power grid.

How America Forgot ‘Never Forget’
The 9/11 Commission warned us once. Let it be a lesson again

Thomas Kean and Lee Hamilton, here in 2004, made collaboration in crisis look easy. We should remember the lessons they taught, Grumet writes. (Scott J. Ferrell/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — This week calls for reflection as we pause to remember the 2,997 people who died in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and the thousands of Americans killed and wounded in military service to our country since that horrific day.

Seventeen years later, we also honor the heroic actions of two American statesmen, former Gov. Thomas Kean and former Rep. Lee Hamilton. They led the eight members of the 9/11 Commission — four Democrats and four Republicans — in an unprecedented, bipartisan effort to understand one of the worst tragedies in American history and to provide the government with a path forward to ensure it never happens again.

Senate Quandary: How to Sanction Russia Without Harming Europe
Foreign Relations chairman predicts resolution in coming weeks

Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As senators deliberate over legislation to impose new sanctions on Russia, former government officials warned against any action that would harm European allies that rely on gas imports from Russia.

“It’s very difficult with some of the bills that have been laid out to only punish Russia without punishing our European friends,” said Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker, R-Tenn., at a Wednesday hearing on the importance of NATO.

Obama to Kick Off Campaigning in Southern California
Will campaign in Republican districts won by Hillary Clinton

Former President Barack Obama, shown here speaking at the North American Climate Summit in December, will campaign for Democratic candidates in Southern California House races this weekend. (Scott Olson/Getty Images file photo)

Former President Barack Obama will make his first stop on the 2018 campaign trail in Southern California on Saturday, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee announced. 

Obama will campaign with candidates Josh Harder in the 10th District, T.J. Cox in the 21st District, Katie Hill in the 25th District, Gil Cisneros in the 39th District, Katie Porter in the 45th District, Harley Rouda in the 48th District, and Mike Levin in the 49th.

Cruz Beefing With Former Iran President (No, Seriously) Over Kaepernick
Texas Republican groups together Ahmadinejad, Kaepernick, and Democratic opponent Beto O’Rourke

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, sparred with former Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad over NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

What happens when a holocaust-denying former Iranian president, a former NFL starting quarterback, and a Texas Democratic candidate for Senate walk into a room?

No one knows.

Think It’s Bad for the GOP Now? Wait for an October Surprise
A wild Tuesday for Republicans, complete with plea deals and indictments, may be just the tip of the iceberg

You don’t have to be the Oracle at Delphi to realize that any further news from special counsel Robert Mueller could change the course of the midterms, Shapiro writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — This is the golden age of political horoscopes — sophisticated projection systems designed to forecast the 2018 elections.

Whether primarily based on the generic ballot (voters currently prefer the Democrats by an 8-point margin) or detailed rundowns of individual races (roughly three dozen GOP-held seats are seriously imperiled), these forecasts all assume that no major external events will upend the political mood before Election Day.

State Department Hedges on Proposed New Russia Sanctions
Trump administration “needs discretion”

Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., questioned a senior State Department official Tuesday about sanctions against Russia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A senior State Department official on Tuesday urged senators to give the Trump administration considerable leeway as lawmakers contemplate new punitive sanctions against Russia.

“We need discretion with those sanctions,” testified Wess Mitchell, assistant secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs, at a Senate Foreign Relations hearing on relations with Russia. “Sanctions without discretion, in my mind, is the antithesis of diplomacy.”

Trump Paris-Bound in November to Watch a Military Parade Instead
President blames city for postponing military parade he wanted in Washington

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron attend the traditional Bastille day military parade on the Champs-Elysees on July 14, 2017 in Paris (Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump plans to go to Paris in November to celebrate the Armistice Day, rather than hosting his own military parade in Washington, D.C.

Trump tweeted that he would also, “attend the big parade already scheduled at Andrews Air Force Base on a different date.”

Cost Isn’t Everything. Pentagon Should Judge Contractors on Cybersecurity, Report Says
Security would be ‘fourth pillar’ in weapons purchase decisions

Aerial view of the Pentagon building photographed on Sept. 24, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Pentagon should take into account the cybersecurity capabilities of defense contractors in addition to cost and performance measures when awarding contracts, a U.S. government-funded think tank recommended in a report published Monday.

Through its buying process, the Pentagon “can influence and shape the conduct of its suppliers,” the Mitre Corp. said in a report titled “Deliver Uncompromised: A Strategy for Supply Chain Security and Resilience in Response to the Changing Character of War.”