Intelligence

House Oversight threatens ex-Trump adviser with contempt after skipping deposition
Former White House adviser Carl Kline is accused of threatening a whistleblower

Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., right, speaks as ranking member Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, listens during the House Oversight and Reform Committee markup of a resolution authorizing issuance of subpoenas related to security clearances and the 2020 Census on Tuesday, April 2nd 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Elijah Cummings threatened Tuesday to hold former White House adviser Carl Kline in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena ordering him to testify about his role allegedly covering up wrongdoing in the Trump administration’s White House security clearance process.

President Donald Trump’s White House counsel directed Kline in a letter earlier this week not to comply with the subpoena. Kline did not appear for his scheduled deposition.

House Democrats start following Mueller’s leads as they investigate Trump
Immediate strategy is continuing their probes, but calls for impeachment growing in caucus

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has urged caution on talk about impeaching President Donald Trump, but many in her caucus feel differently. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats are starting to follow leads laid out in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report as their own investigations into President Donald Trump continue. 

The caucus held a conference call Monday evening in which the six committee chairs who are investigating various matters involving Trump updated members on their next steps now that Mueller has concluded his investigation. Details shared with Roll Call were provided by people on the call who were not authorized to publicly disclose contents of the private caucus discussion.

Mueller report: Russia hacked state databases and voting machine companies
Russian intelligence officers injected malicious SQL code and then ran commands to extract information

Donna Shalala, Democratic candidate for Florida's 27th Congressional District, votes on Election Day at Coral Gables Fire Station 3 on Nov. 6, 2018. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Russian military intelligence unit known by its initials GRU targeted U.S. state election offices as well as U.S. makers of voting machines, according to Mueller’s report.

Victims of the Russian hacking operation “included U.S. state and local entities, such as state boards of elections (SBOEs), secretaries of state, and county governments, as well as individuals who worked for those entities,” the report said. “The GRU also targeted private technology firms responsible for manufacturing and administering election-related software and hardware, such as voter registration software and electronic polling stations.”

Warren: 'House should initiate impeachment proceedings' against Trump
Other 2020 hopefuls say impeachment shouldn't be off the table

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren called on the House to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump on Friday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The day after the release of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report, reaction from 2020 Democrats — as well as one leading Republican — intensified. 

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Friday called for the House to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump, while Utah Sen. Mitt Romney said he was “sickened” by the “dishonesty” coming from the White House. 

Trump feared ‘one of these independent counsels.’ He got something else
Amid Democrats’ criticism, is Barr trying to protect Trump or the office he occupies?

President Donald Trump was worried that “one of these independent counsels,” as Kenneth Starr was during the Clinton administration, would bring the “end of my presidency,” special counsel Robert S. Mueller III concluded in his report. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Jeff Sessions, then the attorney general, ended a phone call and returned to the Oval Office. It wasn’t long before President Donald Trump was in an angry rage.

Sessions, since unceremoniously fired, had just taken a phone call from Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who informed him he had appointed former FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III as a special counsel to look into Russia’s 2016 election meddling, including whether there was coordination with Trump’s campaign.

Chairman Nadler subpoenas fully unredacted Mueller report
DOJ calls New York Democrat’s request ‘premature and unnecessary’

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is seeking to obtain the full, unredacted report by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:26 p.m. | House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler issued a subpoena Friday demanding Attorney General William Barr release a full, unredacted version of the report authored by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

“My committee needs and is entitled to the full version of the report and the underlying evidence with past practice. The redactions appear to be significant,” Nadler wrote in a statement released Friday.

Trump has been all over the place on ‘crazy’ Mueller report
President contends Donald McGahn’s damning notes ‘never existed until needed’

After calling the Mueller report "great" 25 days ago, President Donald Trump on Friday dubbed it "crazy." (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Friday broke his uncharacteristic silence about Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report, calling it “crazy” just 25 days after dubbing it “great.”

In a tweet from rainy Palm Beach, Fla., where he is spending a long Easter weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort and nearby golf club, the commander in chief also lashed out — without naming him — at former White House counsel Donald McGahn, who offered Mueller’s team some of the most damning testimony about Trump and his chaotic West Wing.

Trump painted as media-obsessed in Mueller’s report
At times, focus on press was a blessing for Trump; at other times, it was a burden

President Donald Trump takes questions from reporters at the Capitol in March, alongside Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, center, and Missouri Republican Sen. Roy Blunt. Robert Mueller's report reveals a media-obsessed chief executive. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s investigation of the Trump White House reveals a presidency calibrated to drive and respond to media coverage of itself. Though unconventional, Donald Trump’s unique approach helped save his presidency.

At several critical points of his turbulent term, Mueller found that Trump — who once cold-called New York reporters claiming to be a public relations agent named “John Barron” to promote his real estate ventures — was mostly focused on responding to negative press reports or trying to generate positive ones. When the president took several questionable actions, the former FBI director concluded, it was because he was focused on a “press strategy” — and misleading or even lying to reporters is not a crime.

Mueller says messaging apps likely destroyed Trump-Russia evidence
Tech challenges prevented special counsel from establishing full picture of what happened

Some of the individuals interviewed by the special counsel’s office communicated using apps that “do not provide for long term retention of data or communication records,” according to the Mueller report. (Carl Court/Getty Images file photo)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III concluded that there was insufficient evidence to bring criminal charges against individuals connected with President Donald Trump’s campaign for their ties to Russia, but he said the investigation faced numerous challenges, including technological ones, in establishing a full picture of what transpired in 2015 and 2016.

“While the investigation identified numerous links between individuals with ties to the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump Campaign, the evidence was not sufficient to support criminal charges,” Mueller wrote in his report made public Thursday by the Justice Department.

What happened when I went to a baseball game instead of reading the Mueller report
Some in Washington scrambled. Others spent the day eating Dippin’ Dots

Something happened in Washington on Thursday: the Nats played the Giants. Above, fans pose for photos with George Washington in the stands at Nationals Park in 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

You didn’t have to venture far from the Capitol on Thursday to find a crowd of Washingtonians who weren’t overwhelmed by the Mueller report.

Patrick Corbin, the newest Nationals star starting pitcher, took the mound a little after 1 p.m., before key Democrats like House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler or Senate Intelligence Vice Chairman Mark Warner had even weighed in on the substance of the report.