impeachment

Word play draws pushback at impeachment hearing

Stanford Law professor Pamela Karlan testifies during the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

A witness in the House Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment inquiry hearing apologized Wednesday afternoon for comments she made during the hearing about President Donald Trump’s youngest son, Barron Trump.

Responding to a question from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, Pamela Karlan, a Stanford Law professor, said, “the Constitution says there can be no titles of nobility. So while the president can name his son Barron, he can’t make him a baron.”

Live stream: Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment inquiry hearing
Constitutional law experts testify on impeachment

McCarthy says he has no problem with Nunes’ calls with Giuliani, Parnas
‘There’s nothing wrong that Devin has done,’ House Republican leader says

Intelligence Committee ranking member Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., center, is pictured between Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., left, and minority counsel Steve Castor, right at the panel’s Nov. 19 impeachment inquiry hearing. A Democratic report summarizing evidence compiled in the inquiry revealed call logs showing Nunes had contact with Trump associates who are the center of the inquiry. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told reporters that he has no problem with Intelligence ranking member Devin Nunes’ contact with key players involved in the Ukraine scandal.

“There’s nothing wrong that Devin has done except once again to get accused of something,” McCarthy said of his fellow California Republican.

Capitol Ink | Race to the Exit

GOP report: Evidence ‘does not prove’ Trump pressured Ukraine for political benefit
Republican staff report claims evidence Democrats presented does not establish case for impeachment

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, joined by other House Republicans, speaks to the media during the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump on Nov. 20, 2019. A GOP report by Intelligence staff says Democrats’ evidence “does not prove” Trump abused his authority to pressure Ukraine. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Evidence presented during the fact-finding stage of a House impeachment inquiry “does not prove” Democratic allegations that President Donald Trump abused his authority when pressuring Ukraine into launching an investigation of a rival that would benefit his 2020 reelection campaign, a report released by Republicans Monday evening said.

The 123-page report, authored by Republican staff of the Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs panels, pans the impeachment inquiry as “an orchestrated campaign to upend our political system” and argues that the evidence does not prove Democrats’ allegations against Trump.

To beat Trump, Democrats need to win Wisconsin. The impeachment inquiry isn't helping.
CQ on Congress, Ep. 177

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, arrives to testify before the House Intelligence Committee during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday, November 20, 2019. Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, also testified. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Live: House Intelligence impeachment hearing with Fiona Hill and David Holmes

Dr. Fiona Hill, the former senior director for Europe and Russia on the National Security Council, and David Holmes, a Foreign Service officer who works for Ambassador William Taylor at the U.S Embassy in Kyiv, Ukraine, testify before the House Intelligence Committee Thursday.

Inside the impeachment hearing room

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, arrives to testify before the House Intelligence Committee during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Lots of no-shows for impeachment inquiry depositions
Overall Democrats participated more than Republicans, who had complained about access

Reps. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, left, and Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., make their way to votes in the Capitol on Friday. Jordan referred to the lack of attendance at the impeachment depositions in appealing for Gaetz to be able to attend. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated Nov. 21, 2:28 p.m. | Only a fifth of the 104 members on the three House panels that conducted the impeachment inquiry depositions attended and participated in a majority of the proceedings, according to a CQ Roll Call analysis of the available deposition transcripts.

The Intelligence Committee has released transcripts for 15 of the 17 depositions it has conducted with two other panels: Oversight and Reform and Foreign Affairs. 

Live: House Intelligence impeachment hearing with Kurt Volker and Tim Morrison