House Democrats

‘Shooting with real bullets,’ Democrats change tune on impeachment vote
Rep. Al Green prepared to force third vote on impeaching Trump but has lost some support

Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., left, said she now agrees with Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., that Democrats should not go down the path of impeaching President Donald Trump after supporting two efforts to bring articles of impeachment to a vote last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

An intransigent proponent of impeaching President Donald Trump plans to force his Democratic colleagues to go on record on the issue again this year — after twice doing so last Congress. But the vote tally may look a lot different than in 2017 and 2018 when roughly five dozen Democrats wanted to debate and vote on impeachment.

Democrats, then in the minority, were eager for any forum to debate the president’s alleged crimes since Republicans weren’t investigating them. But now that they’re in the majority and have multiple congressional committees probing Trump, most Democrats want to avoid rushing to judgement or action.

Pelosi says Democrats should not move to impeach Trump
‘I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country,’ speaker tells the Post

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told the Washington Post that she is not for impeaching President Donald Trump, a stunning admission before the release of the special counsel’s report she long said she was waiting for. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi told the Washington Post that she does not believe House Democrats should move to impeach President Donald Trump.

“I’m not for impeachment,” the California Democrat said in an explosive interview published Monday.

House Democrats show improved response to Republican messaging votes
Democrats easily defeated a Republican motion to recommit Friday to their HR 1 government overhaul

Rep. Max Rose, D-N.Y., center, had voted for several Republican motions to recommit this year but he argued against the one the GOP offered to HR 1 Friday, calling it a “joke.” Rep. Joe Cunningham, D-S.C., right, meanwhile was one of six Democrats who voted with Republicans on that motion. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats seem to have sharpened their response to Republican motions to recommit after the GOP twice bested the new majority using the procedural tool this year.

The improved messaging and whip operations around motions to recommit, or MTRs, since Democrats lost a second one early last week on a priority gun control bill seem to have quelled an immediate desire to overhaul the procedural tool.

House passes HR 1 government overhaul, sending it back to campaign trail
With Senate not planning to take it up, Democrats plan to continue fight into 2020

Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Md., led Democrats' effort to draft the HR 1 government overhaul package as chair of the Democracy Reform Task Force. The House passed the measure Friday on a party-line vote. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With passage of HR 1, House Democrats’ political money, ethics and voting overhaul, the mammoth proposal now heads exclusively to the 2020 campaign trail, where candidates in both parties say they believe their message will woo voters.

The House passed the measure 234-193 Friday morning. But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the bill’s foe in chief, has assured his side he plans to officially ignore it in his chamber, refusing to bring it for a vote even as the Kentucky Republican said Wednesday that he believed his party could win elections against people who support it.

House passes anti-hate resolution after days of debate over response to Omar comments
Some Democrats and Republicans wanted a standalone vote to condemn anti-Semitism

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., attends a House Foreign Affairs hearing on Feb. 13. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 7:51 p.m. | The House on Thursday overwhelmingly — but notably, not unanimously — passed a resolution to condemn anti-Semitism, racism and Islamophobia, ending days of spirited debate over the appropriate response recent comments from Minnesota Democratic freshman Ilhan Omar.

The final vote was 407-23. All of the “no” votes came from Republicans, including their No. 3, Conference Chairwoman Liz Cheney of Wyoming. Cheney was among the first three “no” votes recorded, and several other Republicans seemed to be following her lead.

Capitol Ink | Super K Street Man

Concerned about attacking Ilhan Omar, Democrats pivot on anti-Semitism resolution
Some concerned resolution is a distraction, others raise question about standards for rebuke

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and comments she made about Israel has been at the center of debate over a resolution responding to her comments. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

An anti-Semitism resolution that Democratic leaders drafted to respond to comments by freshman Rep. Ilhan Omar has led to an intense debate in the Democratic Caucus about how the party can speak out against hate without personally attacking a colleague. 

Democrats seem to be coalescing around a broader resolution that would reject all forms of religious bigotry, racism and xenophobia. A vote on that could come as soon as this week.

10 things you might not know about HR 1
Some significant changes have not been talked about much as the bill has advanced to the House floor

The House begins debate on HR 1 this week, a comprehensive bill overhauling election and campaign finance law that contains several under-the-radar but still significant provisions. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the House begins debate Wednesday on HR 1 — the Democratic majority’s package overhauling voting, campaign finance and ethics law — some parts of the bill will likely get more attention than others, but several under-the-radar provisions in the 622-page legislation would nevertheless have sweeping impacts.

Here are 10 provisions that have not received much attention as the legislation advanced through committee hearings and markups on its way to the floor.

Capitol Ink | Setting The Bar

Democrats delay vote on anti-Semitism resolution to broaden language to include other types of bigotry
Republicans want stronger reprimand for Omar, while progressives feel resolution should be about more than her

Democratic leaders began work on a resolution condemning anti-Semitism in response to recent critical comments about Israel by Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn. But that is now expected to be broadened to condemn all forms of bigotry. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Democrats will not vote on an anti-Semitism resolution Wednesday as they are still refining the language of the measure, with multiple members saying it is likely to be broadened to reject other forms of religious bigotry such as Islamophobia.

The resolution is Democratic leadership’s response to recent comments from Minnesota freshman Ilhan Omar that lawmakers in both parties have said play into anti-Semitic stereotypes. Some Democrats appear to be concerned, however, that the resolution only targets offenses stirred up by Omar’s comments and not other forms of religious bigotry, including attacks Omar herself has faced for being Muslim.