government shutdown

Whose rules? Your rules!
Vigorous impeachment inquiry debate on House floor

Reps. Steve Scalise, left, and Steny H. Hoyer debate impeachment inquiry on the House floor. (Screenshots/House Recording Studio)

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, a Maryland Democrat, and Minority Whip Steve Scalise spent more than an hour on the House floor Friday afternoon engaged in a spirited debate over the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. The two lawmakers meet on the floor weekly to discuss their caucuses’ legislative agenda. Friday’s exchange was a stark departure from the more congenial tone in their fly-out day conversations.

Senate floor debate beckons amid spending bill impasse
Under stopgap law, lawmakers have about five weeks to reach funding agreement

Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard C. Shelby says there’s a “good chance” the chamber can start debating spending bills next week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate next week could debate a package of spending bills that have received bipartisan support in the Appropriations Committee, according to Chairman Richard C. Shelby.

“I’ve been hearing that and conversations lend me to think there’s a good chance,” the Alabama Republican said Wednesday, noting that the final decision is up to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. “I think there are five, six, seven appropriations bills that we could pass if we get to the floor.”

Power struggle begins atop the House Appropriations Committee
CQ Budget, Ep. 129

Rep. Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., speaks with reporters as she leaves a House Democratic caucus meeting in the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

McAleenan out at Homeland Security, Trump says
Trump to name new acting secretary next week

Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan testifies during an appropriations hearing on Tuesday, April 30, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan is leaving his job, President Donald Trump announced on Twitter.

“We have worked well together with Border Crossings being way down. Kevin now, after many years in Government, wants to spend more time with his family and go to the private sector,” Trump wrote.

Appropriations Chairwoman Nita Lowey announces retirement
New York Democrat has served in the House for three decades

New York Rep. Nita M. Lowey, chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee, is retiring after 16 terms. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey announced Thursday that she is not running for reelection. The New York Democrat was the first woman to lead the powerful committee.

“After 31 years in the United States Congress, representing the people of Westchester, Rockland, Queens and the Bronx, I have decided not to seek re-election in 2020,” Lowey said in a statement. “It is my deep honor and privilege to serve my community and my country, and I will always be grateful to the people who have entrusted me to represent them.”

Congress did not get the ‘impeachment destroyed legislation’ memo
Trump aides contradicted one another about fate of bills as House Democrats probe Ukraine call

President Donald Trump exits a press conference on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York on Wednesday — the first full day of House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — The White House wasted little time planting seeds of doubt about the legislative agenda after Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced an impeachment inquiry, but officials quickly backtracked from those threats.

Just hours after the California Democrat cited Benjamin Franklin and his challenge to “keep” America’s constitutional republic, White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham accused House Democrats of having “destroyed any chances of legislative progress for the people of this country by continuing to focus all their energy on partisan political attacks.”

Senate clears stopgap, pivots to endgame spending talks
The bill funds the government through Nov. 21, giving Congress and the White House more time to reach agreement on appropriations

Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., right, and Vice Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., prepare for a Senate Appropriations Committee markup on Wednesday, June 19, 2019. The Senate voted Thursday to approve the House-passed bill to fund the government through Nov. 21. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate on Thursday cleared a spending bill that will fund the government through Nov. 21, giving lawmakers and the White House more time to reach agreement on the annual appropriations process. The vote was 81-16, with all of the ‘no’ votes coming from Republicans.

President Donald Trump is expected to sign the continuing resolution, holding off another partial government shutdown for at least 52 more days. But this could be the first of several stopgap bills amid tense debates about abortion policy and the border wall.

Transcript: Trump pressed Zelenskiy to coordinate Biden investigation with Barr
House Intelligence Chairman Schiff: ‘We can’t rely on the White House to be forthcoming’

President Donald Trump speaks on the phone in the Oval Office. The White House on Wednesday released a transcript of a July 25 call he had with Ukraine’s new president that is the basis of House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump asked Ukraine’s new president to look into Joe and Hunter Biden and coordinate his probe with Attorney General William P. Barr, according to a transcript of the call released Wednesday by the White House.

“There’s a lot of talk about Biden’s son, that Biden stopped the prosecution and a lot of people want to find out about that, so whatever you can do with the attorney general would be great,” Trump told Ukrainian President-elect Volodymyr Zelenskiy, according to the transcript. “Biden went around bragging that he stopped the prosecution so if you ·can look into it. … It sounds horrible to me.”

White House threatens to shut down legislative process during impeachment inquiry
Move comes after Speaker Pelosi accused president of a ‘breach of his Constitutional responsibilities’

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., departs from a meeting of the House chairmen to discuss impeachment in Speaker Pelosi’s office on Tuesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Something might have finally ended Infrastructure Week: House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry.

Hours after Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced a formal impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump after he admitted both discussing with Ukraine’s new president his desire for the country’s government to investigate Joe and Hunter Biden and holding up a military aid package to Kiev, his White House threatened to shut down work on major legislation.

Averting a government shutdown
CQ Budget, Episode 128

Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., speaks with reporters in the Senate subway on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House passed a continuing resolution last week to extend current funding through Nov. 21, giving Congress an extra eight weeks to get its work done. The Senate is scheduled to vote on a measure later this week. But there’s more in this resolution than just a simple funding extension.