Georgia

Rep. Scalise Falsely Accuses Eric Holder of Inciting Violence at Georgia Rally
Holder clarified that he urged supporters to be ‘be tough’ against GOP political attacks

Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., speaks during a press conference with House Republican Leaders in the House Studio Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Steve Scalise apparently took former Attorney General Eric Holder’s words at a campaign rally for Georgia Democratic candidates literally when Holder said, “When they go low, we kick ’em.”

The Louisiana Republican and third-in-line in House GOP leadership said Holder’s comment amounted to a “call for violence” in an op-ed for Fox News published Thursday.

Brett Kavanaugh to Be Rare Beneficiary of Senate Paired Voting
Votes of Republicans Lisa Murkowski and Steve Daines will be offset

Sens. Steve Daines, R-Mont., and  Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, center, will pair their votes on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Saturday, enabling Daines to attend his daughter’s wedding and Murkowski to voice her position. Also pictured above, Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

When the Senate votes to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Saturday, two senators will engage in a practice that’s all but died out.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, the only member of the Republican Conference opposed to elevating the current D.C. Circuit Court judge to the high court, announced Friday that ordinarily she would vote “no.”

Staffers: Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?
A few hope to be far away from Capitol Hill

Some Hill staffers tell Roll Call they hope to be far from the Hill in five years time. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s a common question in interviews: Where do you see yourself in five years?

For congressional staffers, it’s not the easiest question to answer. Elections, leadership races, resignations — so much could affect their job security.

Republicans Likely in for a Messy December Funding, Leadership Fight
Securing border wall funding key for GOP, members to watch leadership candidates’ tactics

House Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., shown talking to Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., during a press conference September 13, thinks Republicans are in a good position to secure wins in a December funding fight. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republican leaders patted themselves on the back last week for appropriating a large portion of discretionary spending before the start of the fiscal year today, but they’ve also set themselves up for messy spending fight come December over border wall funding that could complicate GOP leadership elections and potentially lead to a partial government shutdown.

Speaker Paul D. Ryan promised President Donald Trump that if he let Congress punt the Homeland Security Appropriations bill — where border wall funding would be debated — until after the November midterm elections, then House Republicans would fight for the wall then.

Photos of the Week: A Historic Hearing and Vote as Nation Watches Hill
The week of Sept. 24 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

A group of women are arrested after sitting-in on First Street outside of the Supreme Court as  nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

A very long and powerful week has nearly come to a close in Washington. Senators reached a deal Friday to delay a floor vote on the Supreme Court nomination to allow for a one-week FBI investigation into allegations of sexual assault by the nominee.

Earlier in the week, the Supreme Court pick’s accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, testified in the Senate, followed by testimony from Brett Kavanaugh. 

Budget Overhaul Panel Dances With Deadline
Womack and Lowey have a lot to work out before November — like when the fiscal year will start

Rep. Steve Womack and his fellow budget process reformers have a lot of ground to cover this fall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A special bicameral panel established to try to overhaul the annual budget process won’t reach a final agreement before the House leaves on Friday for its six-week midterm election break. But its members will meet privately one more time before the lame duck session to discuss various proposals that could become part of a final bill.

“With regards to timeline, the two co-chairs will not complete work on a joint proposal in the three legislative days remaining this month, so the end of September timeline will not be met,” according to Evan Hollander, a spokesman for Rep. Nita M. Lowey. The New York Democrat is co-chairwoman of the Joint Select Committee on Budget and Appropriations Process Reform, alongside co-chairman Steve Womack, an Arkansas Republican, who had pushed for a deal by the end of this month.

Lawmakers Eye Cyber Bounties to Fix Bugs in Federal Networks
House panel approves Senate bill to set up pilot program at DHS

The House Homeland Security Committee approved a Senate bill last week that would set up a bug bounty program at the Department of Homeland Security. Above, Chairman Michael McCaul, R-Texas, and ranking member Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., at a 2014 hearing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers last week moved closer to mandating that the Department of Homeland Security start a bug bounty program that will pay computer security researchers to spot weaknesses in DHS’s computer networks. That requirement would bring the department in line with other U.S. agencies with similar cybersecurity programs.

The House Homeland Security Committee on Thursday by unanimous consent approved a Senate bill that would set up a pilot program at the department. The Senate passed the bill on April 17. The Pentagon, the IRS and the General Services Administration already operate such programs, and lawmakers have proposed legislation that would launch similar efforts at the departments of State and Treasury.

Chuck Schumer Navigates the Resistance
The Senate’s Democratic leader wants to get along with everyone. Now he finds himself between Scylla and Charybdis

Senate Minority Leader Sen. Charles Schumer waves an American flag after unveiling the Democrats’ ‘Better Deal for Our Democracy’ platform in May. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Back when he was policy director for Sen. Charles E. Schumer, Jim Kessler had a conversation with his boss about working with a high-profile Republican. This is how it went, according to Kessler.

Schumer: I can call Newt, he likes me.

Where Congress Will Hunker Down for Hurricane Florence
Rep. Walter Jones remembers another storm that walloped the North Carolina coast

Rep. Walter Jones, R-N.C., speaks with reporters in Statuary Hall in May 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As lawmakers scramble to ensure federal and local organizations are prepared to handle the fallout from Hurricane Florence later this week, they’ve also begun crafting their own personal plans for the Category 3 storm.

This isn’t Rep. Walter Jones’ first test against a hurricane. The longtime North Carolina Republican’s vault of storm memories dates back some 66 years, to 1954 in his hometown of Farmville, North Carolina, just outside Greenville.

Staffer Comes up Short on ‘Jeopardy!’
Welch aide Isaac Loeb came prepared for D.C. and politics questions, but he got none

Isaac Loeb, a legislative aide for Vermont Democratic Rep. Peter Welch, tried twice before to be selected for “Jeopardy.” (Courtesy of Rep. Peter Welch's office)

Isaac Loeb, a Capitol Hill staffer, went on “Jeopardy!” armed for political and government questions but didn’t get a one.

“They love asking questions about D.C.,” said Loeb, 28. a legislative assistant for Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt. “They’ll have ones about the Smithsonian or landmarks of D.C. but there weren’t any of those. I had access to all the museums, which is a wealth of ‘Jeopardy!’ knowledge. The American History Museum was pretty clutch in that regard.”