Georgia

Photos of the Week: A Parade, Virginia Holds Primaries and, of Course, the Baseball Game
The week of June 11 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

A Capitol Visitor Center employee stops to smell the long strands of lei draped on Hawaii’s King Kamehameha statue in the Capitol Visitor Center on Kamehameha Day on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

It’s Not Personal, It’s Baseball
Republicans and Democrats take the field Thursday for the annual Congressional Baseball Game

House Chaplain Patrick J. Conroy, left, leads the Republican and Democratic teams in a moment of prayer before the start of last year’s Congressional Baseball Game. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s time to play ball.

The 57th annual Congressional Baseball Game for Charity, pitting Republican lawmakers against the Democrats, starts at 7:05 p.m. Thursday at Nationals Park.

Democratic Lawmaker Collapses at Immigration Rally
Rep. Joe Crowley fell to ground at protest in front of U.S. Customs and Border Protection

From left, Reps. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., actor John Cusack, Luis Gutierrez, R-Ill., John Lewis, D-Ga., Al Green, D-Texas, Judy Chu, D-Calif., Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., and others sit on the 14th Street NW, entrance to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in protest of the Trump Administration’s policy of separating parents and children at the border on June 13th.  (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

New York Democratic Rep. Joe Crowley collapsed Wednesday at a rally in Washington to protest the Trump administration’s immigration policy allowing parents and children of illegal immigrants to be separated at the border.

“Until they arrest us, we will stay here, however long it takes,” protesters chanted just as Crowley fell to the street in front of U.S. Customs & Border protection, according to a tweet from a CNN reporter who was at the scene.

Analysis: Trump Trip Showed New Approach to Presidency
But lawmakers doubt future presidents will follow such a path

President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un participate in a Tuesday signing ceremony during a meeting on Sentosa Island in Singapore. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

First, Donald Trump remade the Republican Party in his own image. And after his double-dip of G-7 and North Korea nuclear diplomacy, it’s even more obvious he’s doing the same to the presidency.

Some congressional Democrats are worried the former reality television star’s eagerness to break with decades-old norms and traditions is soiling the office and influencing future chief executives to mirror Trump’s ways. And though a handful of Republican members publicly share those concerns, most are helping him transform the highest — and long the most revered — job in the land.

Supreme Court Sides With Ohio’s Voter-Purge Law
Liberals cry voter suppression

Voters wait in line to vote at Hazelwood Central High School on Nov. 8, 2016, in Florissant, Missouri. (Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images file photo)

A divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that Ohio’s law for removing voters from registration rolls does not violate federal laws to protect people who simply choose not to vote, a decision that voter rights advocates say could lead to disenfranchisement across the country.

A 5-4 opinion, written by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. and joined by the court’s conservative wing, could pave the way for other states to use a similar system for keeping their voter rolls up to date.

For Some in Congress, the Opioid Crisis Is Personal
Lawmakers share the stories behind their efforts to combat the epidemic

Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson lost his grandson to an opioid overdose. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As drug overdoses climb — rising 12 percent between October 2016 and October 2017 — Congress has floated dozens of proposals to combat opioid abuse.

Some lawmakers have deeply personal connections to the epidemic of addiction in America. These are their stories.

The August of Our Discontent
What if they canceled recess and no one cared?

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For the second year in a row, the Senate has curtailed its August recess

With Eye on Policy, and Politics, McConnell Scraps August Recess
Senate expected to be away the first week in August before returning for the rest of the summer

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced in a Tuesday statement that the Senate would substantially curtail the August recess. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has announced that the Senate will be in session throughout much of August, citing the need to move legislation and nominees. While widely viewed as a gambit to keep Democrats in competitive 2018 races off the trail, the move could have unintended and unpredictable political consequences. 

“Due to the historic obstruction by Senate Democrats of the president’s nominees, and the goal of passing appropriations bills prior to the end of the fiscal year, the August recess has been canceled,” the Kentucky Republican said in a statement.“Senators should expect to remain in session in August to pass legislation, including appropriations bills, and to make additional progress on the president’s nominees.”

Opinion: The Wall or the Economy? Time for the GOP to Pick
Electoral certainties that once defined immigration debate for Republicans may be changing

Since the Trump administration began even tougher immigration enforcement against undocumented workers, many business owners have struggled to fill low-wage jobs, Murphy writes. (Chris Carlson/AP file photo)

If you were on the outside looking in, last month’s Republican primary for Georgia governor seemed to feature state Sen. Michael Williams, an immigration hard-liner, against everyone else.

Williams made national headlines when he kicked off his “Deportation Bus Tour,” promising to drive around Georgia, “fill this bus with illegals and send them back to where they came from.” But while Williams got a ton of press from his infamous deportation bus, he got almost no Republican votes. In the end, he finished second to last in the primary with 4.9 percent.

McConnell’s Plan for a Packed Summer Senate Agenda
Majority leader says he is “not into playing games this summer”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell spoke with Roll Call about the busy summer agenda. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 3:18 p.m. | Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s aggressive summer legislative agenda features floor time for bundles of spending bills, as well as three major authorizations.

The Kentucky Republican said he would prioritize the fiscal 2019 defense authorization, a new farm bill and updated water resources development legislation.