Emanuel Cleaver II

Rep. Bobby Rush Faces Wage Garnishment on $1 Million Debt
Judge orders Chicago Dem to forfeit 15 percent of monthly congressional salary

Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., left, speaks with Rep. Danny Davis, D-Ill., while waiting for President Barack Obama to deliver his final State of the Union address to a Joint Session of Congress in Washington on Tuesday, Jan. 12, 2016. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Bobby Rush will fork over 15 percent of his congressional salary each month to repay more than $1 million he owes on a delinquent loan for a now-closed church he founded in Chicago.

Rush makes $174,000 a year through his salary in the House of Representatives, where he has served for more than 25 years representing Chicago’s South Side.

One-Tenth of Congress Lists Student Loan Liabilities
‘I don’t understand how young people can become teachers or work in the public service arena’

California Rep. Mark Takano, a House Education member, is still paying back student loans for a 2010 master’s degree from UC Riverside. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 115th Congress scored as one of the richest ever, but one in 10 lawmakers still holds student loan debt, either personally or for a family member. 

Fifty-three members listed a combined $1.8 million in student loans on their financial disclosures. Twenty-eight of them posted a positive net worth while 25 showed negative net worth in Roll Call’s comprehensive Wealth of Congress project.

Underdog Democrats Seize on Primary Opponents’ Gun History
A handful of challengers embrace gun control as a winning issue

Florida Rep. Al Lawson is facing criticism from a primary challenger over gun control. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

With gun rights groups mostly tied to the Republican Party these days, some underdog Democrats have turned to the gun issue to try to gain traction in primaries.

“We believe the race will turn on guns,” a campaign official with Florida Democrat Alvin Brown said in an email Tuesday.

Word on the Hill: Staffer Defends Her ‘Liddle’ Boss
Fitness trends, staffer shuffles, and a new book

Micah Johnson walks with her boss Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker, center, as they get off the Senate subway in May 2016. Also pictured, North Carolina Sen. Richard M. Burr. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The president may be calling out lawmakers but congressional staffers have their bosses backs.

Micah Johnson, communications director for retiring Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., who has been in a war of words with President Donald Trump, defended her boss when she tweeted a cartoon mocking the president.

Congressional Republicans Criticize Trump’s Comments About TV Anchor
President tweeted he turned down meeting as Mika Brzezinski was ‘bleeding badly from a face-lift’

Kansas Rep. Lynn Jenkins said President Donald Trump’s remarks about MSNBC host Mike Brzezinski were “not okay.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 5:59 p.m. | Republican members of Congress criticized President Donald Trump for his comments about TV host Mika Brzezinski on Thursday.

Trump tweeted early in the day that he turned down a meeting with Brzezinski and her “Morning Joe” co-host Joe Scarborough because she was “bleeding badly from a face-lift.”

Six Who Could Succeed Pelosi — Someday
Ouster talk fades, but speculation continues about the next generation of House Democratic leaders

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says she’s “very confident” she retains the support of most members of her Democratic Caucus. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

One week after House Democrats finished 0-for-4 in this special election season, their burst of frustration and pique vented toward Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi appears to have fizzled.

The vexation is not going to fade away altogether, however, and neither will the lawmakers’ whispered talk in the cloakrooms or after their nightly fundraisers about which of them has a plausible shot at someday becoming Pelosi’s successor.

A Day That’s Both Routinized and Indelibly the President’s Own
Trump’s populist tone, churlish crowd, combine with ageless Capitol pomp

From left, First lady Melania Trump, President Donald Trump, Major General Bradley Becker, Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence review the troops following Donald Trump’s swearing-in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

If inaugurations are like weddings — the central figures remain singular and the emotional sensibilities vary, but the liturgies are similar and the outcome is always the same — then the opening day of Donald Trump’s presidency absolutely kept the metaphor relevant.

On Friday, he became the only billionaire, the only brand personification and the only person without any prior experience as a public servant to take the oath of office. And then he excoriated the capital establishment arrayed around him using caustic language and campaign-rally cadences particularly discordant for an inaugural address.

The Sisterhood of the Capitol Hill Staffers
Women’s Congressional Staff Association wants more women in higher positions

Eliza Ramirez, from the office of Massachusetts Rep. Michael E. Capuano, is president of the Women’s Congressional Staff Association. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Word on the Hill: Jay Z Wants Clinton to ‘Run This Town’
Also, more on Trump's golf course and Clinton's trustworthiness

Jay Z will performing for Hillary Clinton days before the election. (Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for TIDAL file photo)

Singer and entrepreneur Jay Z is in an “Empire State of mind” for his home state’s former senator.

Hillary for America announced that the star will headline a get-out-the-vote concert days before the election on Nov. 4 in Cleveland.

House Working Group on Police-Community Relations Begins Meeting Thursday
Group comes in response to shooting last week

Speaker Paul D. Ryan said it was important not to paint people with a broad brush when it came to recent shootings of and by the police. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 7-12 5:10 p.m. A bipartisan working group focused on improving relations between law enforcement and the African-American community will hold its first meeting Thursday before Congress breaks for a seven-week recess.  

Six House Republicans and six Democrats comprise the group, including several members of the Congressional Black Caucus. The meeting will include a pastor, an advocate and a law professor, said House Judiciary Committee Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte and Ranking Member John Conyers, who are on the team.