Doug Owens

Anti-Abortion Group Worries Trump Will Depress Turnout Among 'Pro-Life Voters'
Susan B. Anthony List to help Mia Love mitigate Trump effect down ballot

Utah Rep. Mia Love is in a tough race against a well-funded Democratic opponent. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A leading anti-abortion group is undertaking a major effort to help one of the Republican Party's rising congressional stars, worried that Donald Trump's presence on the ticket could depress turnout among a key constituency — "pro-life voters."

The Susan B. Anthony List, acting through its super PAC Women Speak Out, is preparing a combination of digital ads, phone calls, and in-person voter contacts to support Rep. Mia Love, the Utah congresswoman locked in a tough race against a well-funded Democratic opponent. 

Rating Change: Utah GOP Congresswoman Less Safe for Re-Election
Personal and national factors make Mia Love's race worth watching

Rep. Mia Love may not be a sure bet for re-election in Utah's 4th District, according to a recent poll. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A recent public poll showing Republican Rep. Mia Love trailing Democratic challenger Doug Owens by 6 points doesn’t smell quite right. But the congresswoman could still be in for a competitive race, even though Utah’s 4th District isn’t a typical swing seat.  

The June 2-8 automated poll conducted by SurveyUSA for The Salt Lake Tribune and the Hinckley Institute showed Owens with a 51-45 percent advantage in a hypothetical general election matchup. Operatives on both sides of the aisle are skeptical of the polling numbers, but Democrats are determined to defeat Love and some Republicans concede that the race is worth watching.  

The Seats Democrats Must Win to Retake House
Minority party must gain 30 seats in November; little to no room for error

Democrats are focusing on more suburban districts, where they believe changing demographics are moving seats into the Democratic column, in their effort to regain the majority in the House. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As Democratic chances of taking back the House improve with the success of Donald Trump and Ted Cruz, party strategists are trying to figure out exactly how and where it’s going to happen. It’s not too difficult to see Democrats gaining 10, or even 20, seats in November, but gaining the 30 required for a majority is more difficult and will require Democrats winning a large swath of seats where Republicans are currently heavy favorites.  

Winning the House majority is more than focusing on the presidential margin and allotting House seats to Democrats because of the strength of some GOP incumbents. For example, Democrats are not going to defeat Republican Rep. Frank A. LoBiondo this year, even though President Barack Obama won New Jersey’s 2nd with 54 percent, or win New Jersey’s 3rd (which Obama won with 52 percent), where wealthy GOP Rep. Tom MacArthur could easily outspend any challenger.  

‘14 Losers Looking for Second Chance in ‘16
A dozen House candidates hoping to turn narrow losses into future victories

Illinois Democrat Brad Schneider is running against Rep. Robert Dold to reclaim his old seat. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In sports and in politics, losing by a little can be harder than losing by a lot. At least a dozen 2016 candidates are hoping that their close calls in 2014 were more than a mirage of a missed opportunity.  

California Republican Paul Chabot could barely get national GOP strategists to acknowledge his existence last cycle when he lost to Democrat Pete Aguilar, 52-48 percent, in the 31st District open-seat race.