Dianne Feinstein

Kavanaugh Feared Looking ‘Silly’ on Flip-Flop on Presidential Records
Documents show Supreme Court nominee fretted about position switch while working in White House

Aides attend a news conference with Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman in Dirksen Building on August 2, 2018, with boxes representing roughly 1 million pages of documents to be submitted to the committee on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Long before the current Senate fight over access to presidential records as part of his Supreme Court nomination, Brett Kavanaugh sent an email to his co-workers in the White House counsel’s office about a soon-to-be-published article on access to presidential records that “makes me look very silly.”

Kavanaugh let the office know that Washington Post columnist Al Kamen planned to write a blurb to highlight how he had switched legal positions — now that he was a lawyer in the George W. Bush administration — when it comes to how much power former presidents and their families had to block the release of presidential records.

Feinstein Fighting Back at National Archives Over Kavanaugh Document Trove
Democrats want to see information about Kavanaugh’s time working for Bush

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., wrote in a letter that she is “alarmed.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Dianne Feinstein isn’t happy with the National Archives.

The office is withholding documents related to Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh from Democrats on the panel.

White House Slams Schumer, Feinstein for ‘Disingenuously’ Demanding Kavanaugh Docs
Reviewing requested materials could take until October, National Archives says

Aides attend a news conference with Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman in Dirksen Building on August 2, 2018, with boxes representing roughly 1 million pages of documents to be submitted to the committee on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The White House slammed Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and Judiciary ranking member Dianne Feinstein for “disingenuously” demanding records about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh that are “irrelevant” to his legal views.

“Despite published reports, the White House’s requests for meetings between Judge Kavanaugh and Senators Schumer and Feinstein remain unanswered after over three weeks,” White House spokesman Raj Shah said in a statement.

Dems Rip Page From GOP Playbook to Fight Trump’s Pollution Rollback
Markey: ‘We’ll use every tool available to block the Trump administration’s U-turn on fuel efficiency’

Sen. Dianne Feinstein says “Californians have a right to breathe clean air, and we’re not giving that up to President Trump without a fight.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats opposed to the Trump administration’s proposal to freeze fuel efficiency standards have limited options to fight back in the halls and floor of Congress, but the one option they do have comes straight from the GOP deregulatory playbook.

Once finalized, Democrats, led by top members on the Environment and Public Works Committee, plan to introduce a Congressional Review Act resolution to overturn the Trump administration’s fuel efficiency strategy, Sen. Edward J. Markey told reporters on a phone conference in response to the administration’s proposal Thursday.

Senate Democrats Slam Trump Officials Over Family Separations
Durbin called on the Homeland Security secretary to resign

Sen. Richard J. Durbin, D-Ill., cites a tweet by Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing in Hart Building on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats on Tuesday criticized the Trump administration’s efforts to reunify hundreds of undocumented migrant children who remain separated from their parents as a result of the president’s zero-tolerance border security policy — including many whose parents have already been deported.

Officials from the departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services told the Senate Judiciary Committee that their court-ordered work to reunify separated families is unfinished. 

Foreign Lobbying Overhauls Stall as Manafort Goes to Trial
Critics say no measure gets to the root of 1938 law’s problems

UNITED STATES - NOVEMBER 6: Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort leaves the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse after a court hearing on the terms of his bail and house arrest on Monday, Nov. 6, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This Congress has a crush on the idea of overhauling the nation’s foreign lobbying regulations, but lawmakers apparently can’t seem to find the one bill they want to commit to.

Lawmakers Renew Efforts to Pass Family Separation Bill
But with House already out for recess, no legislative solution possible until September

A girl participates in a rally at Freedom Plaza in downtown Washington on June 27 to to protest the Trump administration policy that separated migrant children from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Lawmakers say they are renewing efforts to find what has been elusive legislation to keep families together at the U.S.-Mexico border, as the Trump administration announced it would meet the latest court deadline for reuniting more than 1,400 children it had separated from their immigrant parents.

Department of Homeland Security officials said they expected to complete all “eligible” reunifications by midnight Thursday, Pacific time. Beyond those, 711 children remain in custody because they’re not “eligible” for reunification, according to the department. Of those, 431 have a parent who was deported from the U.S. without them, officials said.

How the Rest of Congress Reacted to Rosenstein Impeachment Articles
Resolution from 11 conservative House members unlikely to move

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., and 10 other House Republican brought forth impeachment articles Wednesday against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrats and a handful of Republicans responded quickly to oppose impeachment articles against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein brought forth by members of the conservative House Freedom Caucus.

Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows of North Carolina and Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, a founding member, introduced a resolution to impeach Rosenstein late Wednesday but did not file it as a privileged resolution to force a vote by the whole House.

House Freedom Caucus Leaders Introduce Impeachment Resolution for Rod Rosenstein
Mark Meadows, Jim Jordan have clashed with deputy AG

House Republicans have filed an impeachment resolution against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In an escalation of their feud with the second-highest ranking Justice Department official, Rep. Mark Meadows announced that he and Rep. Jim Jordan filed a resolution to impeach Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, claiming that the Justice Department had “repeatedly obstructed oversight” by Congress.

Meadows, the North Carolina Republican who chairs the House Freedom Caucus, and Jordan, the Ohio Republican who is the former chairman of that caucus, have been highly critical of Rosenstein, with Jordan and Rosenstein exchanging testy remarks at a House Judiciary Committee hearing last month

USA Gymnastics, FBI Targets of Latest Senate Hearing on Sexual Abuse
Gymnastics chief seemed unprepared for questions about group’s relationship with former team doctor

Olympic gold medalist and survivor of sexual abuse Aly Raisman spoke during a press conference in the Kennedy Caucus Room on Tuesday, joined by more than 80 other victims. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Applause broke out in the Senate hearing room Tuesday when Sen. Dianne Feinstein asked for former gymnasts who have been sexual abuse victims to stand.

“It was well over a year ago that I had a meeting in my conference room with a group of women, and I walked in,” Feinstein said. “I looked at faces with expressions that I had never seen before, and I realized that it was something that was really serious.”