conservatives

Trump Claims Migrant Caravan in Mexico Has ‘Unknown Middle Easterners’
President threatens to end U.S. aid to Central American countries

A boy and father from Honduras are taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents near the U.S.-Mexico Border on June 12 near Mission, Texas. A caravan of other migrants largely from that country is heading for the U.S.-Mexico border. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Without offering evidence to support the claim, President Donald Trump on Monday contended a large caravan of Central American migrants also includes “unknown Middle Easterners.”

He also threatened to end foreign aid to countries from which most members of the caravan come. That list includes Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. Trump has proposed foreign aid cuts before, only to have Republican and Democratic lawmakers reject them and allocate the funds via massive spending bills Trump was forced to sign to avert more government shutdowns on his watch.

Sheldon Adelson Breaks Spending Record on Midterm Elections, Surpassing $100M
Conservative megadonor outpaces his 2016 spending

Sheldon Adelson, chairman and chief executive officer of the Las Vegas Sands Corporation, attends a forum on guarding against a nuclear Iran in March 2015. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Conservative megadonors Sheldon Adelson and Miriam Adelson have doled out more than $100 million to aid Republicans in the midterm election, far outpacing their giving during the 2016 presidential cycle.

A new $25 million donation puts the billionaire benefactors’ total spending toward helping Republicans hold on to both chambers of Congress at $113 million, Bloomberg reported. The donation was to the Senate Leadership Fund, a super PAC with ties to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Could a Blue Wave Miss Nevada?
Rep. Jacky Rosen faces GOP Sen. Dean Heller, who has never lost a race

Rep. Jacky Rosen, D-Nev., the Nevada Democratic nominee for Senate, dances with a supporter at the East Las Vegas Community Center on Saturday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

LAS VEGAS — Democrats in Nevada are optimistic of unseating Republican Sen. Dean Heller, but they acknowledge it won’t be easy.

“I don’t think anybody should be sleeping well,” said Sylvia Lazos, a law professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, who spent Saturday — the first day of early voting — canvassing for Democratic candidates, including Heller’s opponent, Rep. Jacky Rosen.

November Elections Bring High Stakes for Medicaid
From expansion to work requirements, the future of the program hangs in the balance

What voters do at the polls Nov. 6 will shape access to Medicare in several states. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The midterm elections could bring sweeping changes to Medicaid, from possible eligibility expansions to new rules requiring low-income people to work, depending on voters’ choices for governors’ offices and state legislatures across the country.

Medicaid covers more people than any other federally funded health program.

Heller, Rosen Spar Over Trump in Nevada Senate Debate
Silver State race offers Democrats rare pickup opportunity this cycle

Supporters of Nevada Democratic Senate nominee Jacky Rosen wave signs outside KLASA-TV before the debate between Rosen and Republican Sen. Dean Heller. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

LAS VEGAS — Democrats running for Senate this year have walked a tightrope when it comes to President Donald Trump, but not in closely divided Nevada. Here, their Senate nominee, Rep. Jacky Rosen, more forcefully called for a check on the president Friday night, accusing Republican incumbent Dean Heller of being a “rubber stamp.”

“We need to put a check and balance on this president, something you’re not willing to do, senator,” Rosen said looking directly at Heller in their first and only debate of the campaign, hosted by KLSA-TV.

Trump Ties Sinema to Schumer Even Though She Says She Won’t Support Him
Sinema and McSally face off in Toss-up Arizona Senate race for Flake’s seat

President Donald Trump arrives with Arizona Republican Senate nominee Martha McSally for a rally in Mesa, Ariz., on Friday. (Ralph Freso/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump, rallying in Arizona on behalf of Republican Senate candidate Martha McSally, sought to tie her Democratic opponent Kyrsten Sinema, to Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer even though Sinema said she won’t support him.

A vote for Sinema is “dangerous” because “it’s for Schumer, crying Chuck,” Trump told rallygoers Friday night at an airport hangar in Mesa. 

Both Parties Seek to Energize Base Voters on Health Issues
As Republicans talk Obamacare repeal, Democrats re-emphasize top issue

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer and other Democrats are seizing on comments by Republicans to put health care front and center as the election approaches. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democrats are seeking to energize their core supporters by repeating Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s remark this week that Republicans hope to revive a push to overhaul the 2010 health care law.

“McConnell gave us a gift,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer told MSNBC on Friday. “That’s a game-changer when he shows who he is and wants to really hurt people on health care.”

Scalise Defends Trump Joking About Gianforte Assaulting a Reporter
Majority whip says Trump was ‘ribbing’ Gianforte, not asking his supporters to engage in violence

Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., defended President Donald Trump’s support of a congressman’s assault on a reporter as a joke that does not equate to Democrats’ inciting violence against Trump supporters and Republican candidates. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise has been on TV, Twitter and writing op-eds criticizing Democrats for inciting violence, but on Friday he defended President Donald Trump’s comments about a congressman’s assault on a reporter as simply a joke.

Last year Montana Rep. Greg Gianforte body slammed Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs after the reporter tried to ask him questions about his views on a GOP health care plan. 

Report Casts Doubt on ‘Unhinged’ Duncan Hunter Ad
An attack ad looks to tie his opponent to terrorism through a Muslim civil rights group

Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif., walks down the House steps after final votes of the week in the Capitol on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A report Friday raises new doubts about Rep. Duncan Hunter’s claim that his opponent accepted contributions from an Islamic advocacy group, intensifying criticisms that the congressman has relied on a racist line of attack based on Democratic opponent Ammar Campa-Najjar’s Palestinian heritage in the final stretch of his campaign.

An attack ad casts Democrat Campa-Najjar’s contributions from the Council on American-Islamic Relations as part of a “well-orchestrated plan to infiltrate Congress.”

Rosenstein Agrees to Sit for Transcribed Interview With Judiciary, Oversight Leaders
Freedom Caucus, rank-and-file panel members will not be able to participate

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will sit for a transcribed interview with House Judiciary and Oversight committee leaders on Oct. 24. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has agreed to sit for a transcribed interview with leaders of the House Judiciary and Oversight committees Oct. 24, the panels’ chairmen announced Thursday evening.

The announcement comes just hours after House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows, an Oversight subcommittee chairman, called on Rosenstein to resign, citing his unwillingness to cooperate with the panels’ investigation.