Charles E Schumer

Nadler to subpoena the unredacted Mueller report and underlying materials
Judiciary chairman says contrary to public reports he has not heard that DOJ plans to provide a less-redacted version

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said he will issue a subpoena for the full, unredacted version of the Mueller report and the underlying investigatory materials. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler is officially issuing a subpoena to obtain the full, unredacted report authored by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, and the underlying materials used in his investigation.

Just a few hours after the Department of Justice released a redacted version of Mueller’s report to Congress and the public, Nadler said he will issue a subpoena for the full report and investigatory materials. The Judiciary Committee had voted to authorize him to do so earlier this month, and the chairman had said he would if the Department of Justice declined to willingly provide the full report to Congress.

Barr says he has no problem with Mueller testifying before Congress
Pelosi and Schumer call for special counsel to appear before House and Senate

Attorney General William Barr testifies before a House Appropriations subcommittee on the Justice Department’s fiscal 2020 budget request on April 9. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Attorney General William Barr said Thursday he had no problem with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III testifying before Congress about his investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election or possible collusion with the Trump campaign.

“I have no objection to Bob Mueller personally testifying,” the attorney said at a news conference before the release of Mueller’s 400-page report.

Chao defends delayed 737 Max decision, to House appropriators
The FAA’s handling of the crash raises questions about how the agency operates

Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao arrives for the Senate Appropriations Committee Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee hearing on the proposed Transportation Department budget for FY2020 on Wednesday, March 27, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao defended to House appropriators the administration’s decision not to immediately ground the Boeing 737 Max after an Ethiopian Airlines crash last month, even as other countries did so right away.

While Chao was appearing before the House Transportation-HUD Appropriations Subcommittee to defend the administration’s budget request for her agency, Chairman David E. Price, D-N.C., and ranking member Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., both said they wanted to understand more about the Federal Aviation Administration's process for certifying the model of the Boeing plane.

Ocasio-Cortez still popular in district despite being unfavorable nationally
New York Dem’s favorability ratings in own district track with party leaders Schumer, Pelosi

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., attends a House Financial Services Committee hearing titled "Putting Consumers First? A Semi-Annual Review of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau," in Rayburn Building on Thursday, March 7, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Most people in this country either don’t like her or just don’t know enough about her, but Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez remains popular among her home constituency in New York’s 14th District.

Fifty-two percent of the freshman congresswoman’s registered constituents in The Bronx and the north-central portion of Queens view her favorably, compared to 33 percent who view her unfavorably, according to a new poll from the Sienna College Research Institute released Wednesday.

A House floor vote on spending caps could divide Democrats
As eager as Democrats are to raise spending caps, they don’t all agree on how much higher the new caps should be

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., left, and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., are seen outside the Supreme Court during a rally with Congressional Democrats on Tuesday, April 2, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House might vote this week on a bill to raise discretionary spending limits for the next two fiscal years.

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer was hedging his bets late last week, saying only that a floor vote was “possible.”

Photos of the week: Cherry blossoms, Final Four prep and ‘Queer Eye’
The week of April 1 as captured by Roll Call's photographers

Aiden Anthony, right, and Cameron Foreman, both 7, participate in the Blossom Kite Festival on the National Mall on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The cherry blossoms reached peak bloom this week just in time for the annual festival celebrating the special branches.

It was a busy week on the Hill full of multiple subpoena-authorizing hearings, a speech from the NATO secretary general, basketball excitement and a visit from the Netflix stars of the show “Queer Eye.”

Dear senators: More conflict please

Maybe a little MORE conflict is what the Senate needs to get out of its funk. (Laura Patterson/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate pushed the nuclear option, again, to change its rules so judicial and executive nominees are subject to less debate. With a debate that featured Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell delivering such eloquent bon mots as “He started it!” at Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, it’s fair to ask what it will take to restore the chamber to a place that looks like it’s populated with adults. 

“Ironically, I think it’s going to take more conflict,” says James Wallner, a senior fellow at the R Street Institute, former Senate aide and all-around procedural badass.

More Chinese fentanyl may stay out of the US under a new bipartisan bill
Another bipartisan proposal would help physicians learn more about a patient’s substance abuse history.

Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., arrives in the Capitol for the weekly Senate luncheons on Tuesday, March 5, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Calls to address the opioid crisis resumed Thursday as lawmakers released a bill that aims to curb the flow of illegal opioids into the United States and another to help physicians learn more about a patient’s substance abuse history.

The separate actions by a bipartisan group of senators and another of House members are drawing fresh attention to the overdose crisis, which is a concern for both parties even though Congress cleared an opioids law just last year. One of the bills, a Senate measure, stands a good chance of becoming law, said co-sponsor Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer.

‘Nuclear’ fallout in Senate might take some time to register
Democrats show no immediate signs they are contemplating retaliation

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., decried the erosion of senators’ influence and ability to serve as advocates for their states in the latest move to alter the rules of Senate debate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate’s Geiger counters hardly registered Wednesday afternoon after the most recent deployments of the “nuclear option” to speed up confirmation of President Donald Trump’s nominees, although the long-term effects on the institution may very well be significant. 

The first nominee considered, Jeffrey Kessler to be an assistant secretary of Commerce, was ultimately confirmed by voice vote after the two hours of post-cloture debate allowed under the new process was declared expired.

House Democrats make habit of voting on legislation that doesn’t change any laws
For four legislative weeks the House has held votes on nonbinding resolutions used for messaging

Rep. Colin Allred, D-Texas, center, is the sponsor of the House’s latest nonbinding resolution, a measure condemning the Trump administration for arguing in federal court that the entire 2010 health care law should be overturned. He is pictured with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., left, and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., right at a rally on the matter on Tuesday outside the Supreme Court. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats are forming a nonbinding habit. For four legislative weeks in a row, the new majority has held votes on resolutions that do not carry the force of law and are designed simply to send a message.

A Roll Call analysis found that roughly one out of every five votes the House has taken this year while the government has been open have been on nonbinding measures.