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Suicide prevention hotline to get three-digit phone number
FCC chairman says he will move ahead following legislation, staff report

Ajit Pai, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, plans to move ahead with establishing a three-digit suicide prevention hotline. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It should soon be easier to call a suicide prevention hotline.

The Federal Communications Commission plans to move forward with establishing a three-digit number for the federally-backed hotline.

Trump urged unity after shootings. But White House is hitting Dems hard
President heads to Dayton and El Paso as his team criticizes political opponents

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump will take Air Force One to Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, on Wednesday after mass shootings in both cities. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s warnings about political divisions hindering efforts to stave off future mass shootings began to erode Tuesday at his own White House, as he and senior aides took not-so-veiled shots at Democrats.

The president will spend time Wednesday with some family members of the victims of deadly weekend shootings in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, and others, 48 hours after warning of the dangers of political division and calling for unity.

9/11 victims bill heads to Trump‘s desk after clearing Senate
Final action on the measure came after months of emotional lobbying by ailing first responders and their families

Jon Stewart, former host of The Daily Show, smiles as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks by at the Ohio Clock Corridor in the Capitol on Tuesday, July 23, 2019. The Senate will be voting later today on HR 1327: Never Forget the Heroes: Permanent Authorization of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund Act. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate cleared a measure Tuesday that would extend a financial lifeline to thousands of victims suffering health problems from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

By the lopsided vote of 97-2, the Senate agreed to a House-passed bill that would effectively make permanent a special compensation fund for first responders and other victims of the 2001 attacks, while providing however much money is needed to pay all eligible claims filed by Oct. 1, 2090.

U.S., Sweden need to move ASAP on Rocky’s detention, Espaillat says
Rapper has been held since early July, and the Harlem congressman is getting involved

A$AP Rocky has been held in Sweden since early July. (Christopher Jue/Getty Images file photo)

Rep. Adriano Espaillat is not satisfied with the U.S. government’s response to American rapper A$AP Rocky’s detention in a Swedish jail, and plans to “mobilize” ahead of the rapper’s Friday hearing.

Espaillat, who represents the Harlem neighborhood where the rapper was born, says he’s talked with officials at the State Department who have promised to monitor the situation.

9/11 aid bill passes House after emotional lobbying campaign
It was passed by the lopsided margin of 402-12

From left, comedian and advocate Jon Stewart, Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., are on the Speaker's balcony after a meeting in the Capitol about funding for the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund on Tuesday, June 11, 2019. 9/11 responders attended the meeting. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The House voted Friday to extend a financial lifeline to thousands of victims suffering health problems from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington.

By the lopsided margin of 402-12, the House passed legislation that would effectively make permanent a special compensation fund for first-responders and other victims of the 2001 attacks, while providing however much money is needed to pay all eligible claims.

Pete Buttigieg, youngest of 2020 hopefuls, was unwilling to wait his turn in 2010 too
Bid for Indiana state treasurer did not attract red-state voters, but provided a ‘crash course’

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana, at a rally protesting President Donald Trump’s policies outside the White House in June. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

This is the third installment in “Battle Tested,” a series analyzing early campaigns of some Democrats seeking the 2020 presidential nomination. Earlier pieces focused on Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s campaign for a New York seat in the House in 2006 and Sen. Cory Booker’s 2002 bid for mayor of Newark, New Jersey.

A decade before he seemingly came out of nowhere at age 37 to become a top-tier candidate in the crowded race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, Pete Buttigieg stood at a podium in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and told state party leaders he was not going to wait his turn.

Are we in this American experiment together? A July Fourth question to contemplate
Backlash from Harris’ debate performance shows the country still has a long way to go

Reactions to California Sen. Kamala Harris’ performance in last week’s Democratic debate have exposed the divide between those Americans allowed to express and feel pain and those expected to grin and bear it, Curtis writes. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images file photo)

OPINION — Who doesn’t love Cary Grant, the debonair British-born, American acting legend, who wooed leading ladies, including the Hepburns, Katharine and Audrey, as well as generations of moviegoers? 

But he was not so charming when his submarine commander character in 1943’s “Destination Tokyo” said: “The Japs don’t understand the love we have for our women. They don’t even have a word for it in their language.”

‘Mike Wallace Is Here’ shows how we got here
Political Theater podcast, Episode 80

“Mike Wallace Is Here” documents the career of the legendary journalist — as well as his role in creating the political and news world we live in now. (Bryan Bedder/Getty Images file photo)

The new film “Mike Wallace Is Here” shows how legendary journalist Mike Wallace pioneered holding the powerful accountable, be they politicians, celebrities or real estate developers. But today’s world is one where journalists are in danger and the credibility of its practitioners is constantly called into question. What happened?

On the latest Political Theater podcast, the documentary’s director, Avi Belkin, discusses the arc of Wallace’s career and where things started to shift. In the course of compiling the movie — from thousands of hours of archival footage from CBS’ “60 Minutes” program that made Wallace a star — Belkin says he noticed just how much richer and articulate conversation was among journalists and the subjects they covered. And he argues that the audience bears a responsibility in all this too. 

Democrat wants Trump to pay if ‘authoritarian-style’ July 4 event damages infrastructure
Virginia Rep. calls on the president to reach into his own pocket if D.C. streets or bridges require repairs

A visitor stands in front of temporary fencing installed along the National Mall as setup continues for President Donald Trump’s “Salute to America” event honoring service branches on Independence Day at the Lincoln Memorial on Tuesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump should pay out of his own pocket for any infrastructure damage incurred by rolling 70-ton tanks onto the National Mall, according to the Democratic congressman who represents the D.C. suburbs in Virginia.

Rep. Don Beyer described Trump’s plan to showcase tanks during the city’s Fourth of July celebration as “an authoritarian-style marshal display” in a statement Tuesday. He called on the president to reach into his own pocket if D.C. streets or bridges require repairs from having to handle the massive vehicles. 

Harrowing stories of black youth suicide moved Bonnie Watson Coleman to act
Democratic lawmaker hopes new task force can get to the bottom of the suicide crisis

“I can’t take this,” Bonnie Watson Coleman told her staffers. “Maybe I can’t fix it, but I can sure push it out as an issue.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It started with check-ins on her social media pages. Usually she hears from constituents about charged topics like taxes and health care, just as lawmakers have for years through old-fashioned mail.

But what Bonnie Watson Coleman started to see on Facebook and Twitter disturbed her: heartbreaking stories of black elementary school-age children dying of suicide.