Budget

Impeachment news roundup: Oct. 10
The latest on the impeachment inquiry

The Capitol dome is frame by a protest sign as a coalition of progressive activist groups rallies at the Capitol for Congress to impeach President Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Public opinion polls have shifted toward impeachment, with recent ones for the first time showing a majority favors it.

A Fox News poll released Wednesday showed 51 percent of Americans feel Trump should be impeached and removed from office. That’s up from 42 percent who felt that way in July.

Justice Department slow to answer Congress on gun background checks
House Appropriations has asked Attorney General William Barr to clarify April testimony

The House Appropriations Committee has asked Attorney General William Barr to clarify testimony he gave Congress in April. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House lawmakers are still waiting for Attorney General William Barr to answer written questions after he misstated key data about gun background checks during testimony in April.

The questions revolve around a controversial provision in federal law that lets gun dealers sell firearms before a background check is completed if that takes longer than three business days.

House may join money laundering, disclosure bills to gain votes
The two bills are expected to be merged and then will head to the House floor soon after Congress returns from recess

Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., attends a House Financial Services Committee hearing in the Rayburn House Office Building on July 17, 2019. Maloney is co-sponsor of one of two anti-money laundering bills that are expected to be merged soon after Congress returns. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

A pair of anti-money laundering bills are expected to be merged and head to the House floor soon after Congress returns from recess.

The House Financial Services Committee voted 55-0 in May to advance one of the bills, a measure co-sponsored by Democrat Emanuel Cleaver II of Missouri and Republican Steve Stivers of Ohio, that would update the framework used by federal investigators to combat money laundering.

Local newspapers wait anxiously for pension funding relief
Crucial retirement savings package appears stuck in the Senate

Washington Sen. Patty Murray blames Republicans for holding up the retirement savings package that includes pension relief for local newspapers. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Local newspapers serving communities from Tampa, Florida, to Walla Walla, Washington, say they’re under the gun from a pension funding “cliff” they face next year that will make them have to rapidly catch up on required contributions, exacerbating their well-documented financial decline.

When relief for some 20 publishers passed the House in May on a 417-3 vote as part of sweeping retirement savings legislation, it seemed like a slam dunk that lawmakers would ride to the rescue in time.

Impeachment News Roundup: Oct. 7
The latest on the impeachment inquiry

Kurt Volker, former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine, was deposed by the House committees conducting the impeachment investigation last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Missing documents: The House Appropriations Committee is “processing” a “partial production of some” of the documents requested from the Office of Management and Budget regarding the Trump administration’s decision to temporarily withhold aid to Ukraine. The panel hasn’t received all the documents and information requested, according to spokesman Evan Hollander.

More subpoenas: House Oversight, Foreign Affairs and Intelligence Committee chairmen on Monday issued subpoenas for Pentagon and Office of Management and Budget documents as part of the House’s impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper and OMB acting director Russell Vought have until Oct. 15 to produce the requested documents.

Democrats: Budget rule change undercuts Congress’ authority
The new rule instructs agencies to report alleged violations only if the agency, in consultation with OMB, agrees a violation occurred

Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., leaves the Senate Democrats’ policy lunch in the Capitol on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic appropriations leaders wrote to the Office of Management and Budget Friday objecting to a decision to limit agencies’ reporting of alleged budget violations, which they said is an attempt to weaken congressional oversight.

The letter from House Appropriations Chairwoman Nita M. Lowey, D-N.Y., and Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., the ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, follows a General Accountability Office opinion that suggests the new procedure violates the law.

Elizabeth Warren’s lobby tax may not hold up to legal scrutiny
Massachusetts Democrat’s proposals take aim at what she dubs “excessive” lobbying

Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s proposals to curb what she calls “excessive” lobbying would face near-certain legal challenges, experts say. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

If Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s long-shot tax on big K Street lobbying tabs were to make it into law, the measure would face legal challenges and is widely seen more as a political platform than an actual policy.

The Massachusetts Democrat’s presidential campaign has unveiled broad proposals to curb what she has dubbed “excessive” lobbying, including a hefty tax on companies, trade associations and other groups that spend more than $500,000 per year on federal lobbying.

Impeachment news roundup: Oct. 2
The latest on the impeachment inquiry

(Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Change of heart: New York Rep. Max Rose said Wednesday that he would “fully support” the House’s impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. The freshman lawmaker was among a handful of House Democrats who had not backed the probe. Rose told a town hall audience in his Staten Island district that he opposes “a rush to judgement” but will “follow the facts where they lead no matter the consequences.”

Biden goal?: Trump refused to answer a reporter's question about just what he wanted the Ukrainian government to do with former Vice President Joe Biden and son Hunter Biden. Trump repeatedly snapped at Reuters’ Jeff Mason, who repeatedly asked the question to an increasingly agitated president.

How Klobuchar won where other Democrats haven’t
Three-term Minnesota senator and 2020 hopeful leaned into family’s Iron Range roots

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, seen here at the Iowa State Fair in August, has made her electability her biggest pitch in the Democratic presidential primary. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Amy Klobuchar didn’t miss a beat.

With a two-word retort, she turned what was meant to be an insult into a compliment.

Mac Thornberry joins Republican ‘Texodus’ from House
Top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee to retire rather than seek 14th term

Texas GOP Rep. Mac Thornberry is not running for reelection. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Mac Thornberry is the latest Texas Republican to head for the exits, announcing Monday that he is not running for reelection. The 13-term lawmaker is the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee.

Thornberry was facing GOP term limits on the committee, having served two previous terms as chairman before the start of the current Congress, where he became the ranking member after Democrats took over the House.