Bruce Poliquin

Election Day +3: Here Are the Uncalled 11 House and 2 Senate Races
Some races going to recounts, one is going to court

Florida Gov. Rick Scott was celebrating an apparent victory with supporters on Tuesday night, but is now suing one county’s supervisor of elections with a recount looming. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:46 p.m. | Three days after Election Day, two Senate and 11 House races remain uncalled, and if the 2000 presidential race is an indication, we could be waiting weeks for the outcome of one of those Senate races.

A third race in the Senate will be decided later this month when Mississippi votes in a runoff between Tuesday’s top-two finishers.

It’s Thursday — 13 House Races, 3 Senate Races Yet Unresolved
Democrats look to expand their majority in the House, as GOP looks for Senate gains in Arizona, Florida

Republican Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, has not been declared the winner in his race against Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson, though Nelson is calling for a recount. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Two days after Election Day, three Senate races and 13 House races remain unresolved. A runoff later this month will determine the winner of the Senate race in Mississippi.

House Democrats have already passed the threshold for a majority by winning 225 seats so far, wresting control of a chamber they haven’t held since 2010. Based on current projections, they could obtain as many as 234 seats — good for a 33-seat majority — though it is more likely they’ll land somewhere around 228 seats for a still-significant 21-seat margin.

Down to the Wire: 16 House Races, 2 Senate Races Yet to Be Called
Democrats look to expand their majority in the House, as GOP looks for Senate gains in Arizona, Florida

Martha McSally, R-Ariz., is leading narrowly in the Arizona Senate race, which as of Wednesday afternoon had not been called. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two Senate races and 16 House races remain uncalled as of 9 p.m. Wednesday on the East Coast.

House Democrats have already passed the threshold for a majority by winning 220 seats so far, wresting control of a chamber they haven’t held since 2010. Based on current projections, they could obtain as many as 234 seats — good for a 33-seat majority — though it is more likely they’ll land somewhere around 228 seats for a still-significant 21-seat lead over the Republicans.

The 10 Most Vulnerable House Incumbents on Election Day
Iowa’s Rod Blum gives up the top spot but remains vulnerable

Pennsylvania Rep. Keith Rothfus claims the top spot in Roll Call’s final list of the most vulnerable incumbents of the 2018 cycle. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Heading into Election Day, Republicans once again occupy all 10 spots of Roll Call’s list of most vulnerable House incumbents, but for the first time this cycle, Iowa Rep. Rod Blum is not leading the pack.

While President Donald Trump won Blum’s 1st District in 2016, operatives from both parties have consistently identified the two-term congressman as the incumbent most likely to lose this cycle — until the past month.

Republicans Need a Cold Compress With Less Than One Month to Go
Presidential pain still plagues vulnerable incumbents ahead of the midterms

President Donald Trump may turn out Democrats better than any Democrat could. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Weather metaphors are often used (and overused) in election analysis, but there’s a better way to describe the Republicans’ challenge in 2018. The GOP is dealing with many headaches as it tries to preserve the Republican congressional majorities.

From tension to cluster to migraine, they can vary in frequency and severity. And Republicans’ ability to alleviate them will determine control of the House and Senate in the 116th Congress.

The 10 Most Vulnerable House Incumbents: Blum’s Still the One
Erik Paulsen and Bruce Poliquin make the list for first time this cycle

Iowa Rep. Rod Blum remains the most vulnerable incumbent. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

With one month to go until Election Day, two new names are on our latest ranking of the most vulnerable House incumbents, but once again, the list remains all-Republican.

Despite widely over-performing President Donald Trump in his district in 2016, Minnesota Rep. Erik Paulsen looks to be in tougher shape this year in a seat Hillary Clinton comfortably carried. He has company — four of the most vulnerable incumbents are running in Clinton districts, with Colorado’s Mike Coffman and Kansas’ Kevin Yoder moving up on the list. 

It’s Baaaccck! Health Care Law Again Front and Center in Midterms
As voters worry about health care, Dems flip the pre-existing script

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., speaks at a July 19 press conference in the Capitol on pre-existing conditions. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Missouri Democratic senator Claire McCaskill is taking an approach in her fight for re-election that would have been unthinkable in her race six years ago — she’s defending the health care law.

The two-term, red-state senator has attacked her opponent, Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley, for joining a suit brought by conservative state officials seeking to overturn the law and has rebuked the Trump administration for undercutting its protections.

Prepare to Be Disappointed on Election Night
Close races, voting schemes and mail-in ballots could all complicate calling control of Congress on Nov. 6

The race for Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith’s Mississippi seat lists among the complicating factors that might impede calling control of the Senate on Nov. 6, Gonzales writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After two years of campaigning in the latest most consequential election of our lifetimes, election night could be a huge letdown. The disappointment is not about which party prevails Nov. 6, but the reality that a combination of close races and West Coast contests could prevent enough races from being called to determine majorities in Congress until days later.

In the Senate, more than 10 races could finish within single digits, and a handful of those contests look like they’re neck and neck. The close margins could make it difficult for media outlets to project a winner on election night. Since Republicans have just a two-seat majority, every Senate race matters, so anything left uncalled could make it difficult to figure out who will control the chamber next year.

GOP Super PAC Continues Attacks on Maine’s Jared Golden
CLF has reserved $3.1 million in 2nd District to defend Poliquin

(Screenshot/Youtube/Congressional Leadership Fund)

A Republican super PAC tied to House leadership is launching its fourth ad against Maine Democrat Jared Golden on Friday.

The fight to hold on to the 2nd District, where GOP Rep. Bruce Poliquin is running for a third term, is a top priority for Republicans. Congressional Leadership Fund has now reserved $3.1 million for the seat, among the most it’s reserved in competitive districts around the country.