border security

Trump invites moderate Dems to WH for shutdown meeting — but some decline
Blue Dog Coalition leaders Lou Correa and Stephanie Murphy will not attend

Rep. Lou Correa, D-Calif., is rejecting an invitation to meet with President Donald Trump at the White House Tuesday to discuss border security and how to end the partial government shutdown, saying he'd be happy to talk once government is reopen. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump has invited some more moderate House Democrats to the White House Tuesday to discuss border security and how to end the partial government shutdown, but at least two of the invited members do not plan to attend. 

Trump’s official schedule for Tuesday lists a 12:30 p.m. meeting with unnamed members of Congress. The  White House has not announced other details.

Democrats could sue if Trump declares national emergency over wall, Hoyer says
Majority leader says technology, more personnel at border would be more effective than barrier

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., applauds for reporters who used to attend his press briefings as minority leader, during his first briefing of the 116th Congress as majority leader. ( Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer said Democratic leadership has not yet discussed what their reaction would be if President Donald Trump were to follow through on his threat to declare a national emergency on the border to build his wall, but he said a lawsuit is certainly a possibility.

Hoyer reiterated Democrats’ opposition to a border wall and said they’re not really interested in alternative barriers either. He said experts have said neither a wall nor fencing is what’s really needed at the border but rather technology, drones and more personnel.

Capitol Ink | Trump’s Wall

Capitol Ink | Trumpty Dumpty

$1.6 Billion for Border Security, Not Just Wall, Could Be Agreed To, Hoyer Says
Wall funding remains principle unresolved item in year-end spending negotiations

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said $1.6 billion is an agreeable figure for border security funding so long as the language doesn’t require it be spent on a wall. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer said Tuesday that border wall funding remains the principle unresolved item in year-end spending negotiations and suggested that $1.6 billion is an agreeable figure for border security so long as the language does not require it to be spent on the wall.

“The $1.6 billion ... the language is broader than just a wall, so I think that that could probably be agreed upon, which was a figure in the Senate bill," the Maryland Democrat told reporters.

Capitol Ink | Make Way For Lame Ducklings

Republicans Put Immigration Divisions on Hold for ICE Messaging Votes
GOP members still want to vote on family reunification, agriculture guest worker program

Immigration has bedeviled Speaker Paul D. Ryan and House Republicans, but they will push messaging votes on it either this week or next. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Lacking a unified strategy on most immigration policy, Republicans are looking to temporarily set aside their differences and highlight an issue that has divided Democrats. 

GOP leaders are planning two votes this week or next related to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, which some Democrats say they want to abolish.

House Rejects GOP’s ‘Compromise’ Immigration Bill — Overwhelmingly
Republicans to turn attention to narrow bill addressing family separations

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has reiterated his support for a Republican compromise immigration bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans’ legislative attempt to find consensus within their own party on the divisive issue of immigration failed on the floor Wednesday, with the chamber overwhelmingly rejecting their so-called compromise bill, 121-301. 

The outcome was predicted Tuesday as a late amendment that was negotiated over the weekend did not convince enough hesitant members to support the bill. The amendment was left out of the final bill.

House GOP ‘Uphill Fight’ on Immigration About More Than Trump
President’s tweets not helping, but Republicans still have major policy divisions

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., leaves the Capitol in the rain after the final vote of the week on Friday. He plans to spend his weekend continuing negotiations over immigration legislation, striving to reach an agreement on changes before a rescheduled vote next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump is certainly not helping House Republicans by deeming their immigration negotiations a waste of time, but he’s far from the only issue they face in what one GOP leader called an “uphill fight” to pass legislation.

The House Republican Conference is still struggling internally to coalesce around a bill that members from the various GOP factions negotiated in recent weeks, dubbed the compromise bill. Republican leaders had initially scheduled a vote on the measure for Thursday, and then thought about Friday. Ultimately, they decided to push it off into the next week to negotiate further changes

House Rejects Conservative Immigration Bill, Delays Consideration of Compromise
Goodlatte-sponsored bill goes down as leaders look to round up support on second measure

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., followed by Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Mo., leaves Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s offices on Thursday, June 21, 2018, as House GOP leadership tries to find a path to pass immigration legislation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House on Thursday rejected, 193-231, an immigration bill conservatives favor, as GOP leaders delayed a vote on a compromise immigration bill moderate Republicans prefer. 

The vote on final passage of the compromise measure, originally scheduled for Thursday evening, is being moved to Friday to provide more time to answer members' questions about the bill, GOP aides confirmed.