art

Native American representation on Capitol Hill concerns House lawmakers
Appropriators take aim at what they call offensive art and disrespectful tours

House Appropriators are urging the Architect of the Capitol to work with the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian to contextualize portrayals of Native Americans on Capitol Hill. Former Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, R-Colo., a member of the Northern Cheyenne tribe and pictured here, spoke at the opening of the museum in 2004. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo.)

House lawmakers are raising issues about Native American representation in and around the Capitol — and they aren’t talking about the record number of Native American women in the 116th Congress.

A House Appropriations Committee report released Wednesday highlights disrespectful descriptions of Native Americans on Capitol tours and depictions in artwork around the Capitol campus, which “do not portray Native Americans as equals or Indian nations as independent sovereigns.” 

Capitol Police arrest Rayburn projection protester, confiscate equipment
Equality Act protest projection results in arrest by Capitol Police

Capitol Police arrested a man who was projecting the words "Discrimination is Wrong" onto the Rayburn House Office Building. (Photo: Robin Bell)

Capitol Police arrested a man projecting the words “Discrimination is Wrong” onto the Rayburn House Office Building Wednesday night. Robert Diesu, a collaborator of projection artist Robin Bell, was arrested and USCP seized a laptop computer, battery, projector and stand as evidence.

Capitol Police told Roll Call in a statement that Diesu was arrested at about 8 p.m. for “unlawful demonstration on Capitol Grounds by projecting an image on the Rayburn House Office Building.”

David Copperfield Pushes for Magic as Art
Famous magician does not demonstrate his art during panel discussion

Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas shakes hosted magician David Copperfield at the U.S. Capitol Thursday to push a resolution recognizing magic as "a rare and valuable art form worthy of being declared a national treasure."Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

David Copperfield came to Capitol Hill on Thursday, but he didn't saw anyone in half or make anyone disappear.  

Instead "the world's most famous magician," at least according to Rep. Pete Sessions, talked about magic as a form of art.  

Senegal Represents at Phillips Collection

(Clark Mindock/CQ Roll Call)

The paint filling in the sketched lines on an alley wall behind the Phillips Collection couldn’t have come at a more appropriate time.

The artists who stood on scaffolding and ladders, reaching to the highest portions of the mural with bright yellow, red and orange paint on Oct. 23 had come from across the Atlantic to decorate the wall. For them, artistic expression is necessarily political, and having their culture represented on a wall in the district is an important means of connecting the people of the United States with the people of Senegal, West Africa.