Amy Klobuchar

Russians Targeting Senate, Staff Personal Emails, Sen. Ron Wyden Warns
And the Senate sergeant-at-arms can do nothing to stop the cyber attacks — for now

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., told colleagues that Russian hackers have been targeting senators’ and aides’ personal accounts and devices. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Ron Wyden implored his colleagues to enact legislation that would allow the Senate sergeant-at-arms to provide cyber protections to senators and staffers for their personal devices and accounts.

The Oregon Democrat warned Senate leaders that the state-backed Russian group responsible for hacking the Democratic National Committee before the 2016 election, “Fancy Bear,” has also tried infiltrating the personal communications networks of senators and their staffers, including Wyden’s own aides.

Photos From the Road: Minnesota Loves a Parade
Roll Call visits the Gopher State, home to several key races this cycle

Dan Feehan, the Democratic nominee in Minnesota’s 1st District, greets guests at the Multicultural Fiesta in St. James, Minn., on Saturday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Minnesota is ground zero for the 2018 midterms. With four competitive House races, two Senate elections and a gubernatorial contest, there’s been no shortage of campaigning across the Gopher State. 

Roll Call is in the state all week, capturing the candidates and talking to voters, so keep following along for more coverage.

At the Races: Second to Last in the Nation
Our weekly newsletter on congressional campaigns

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Welcome to At the Races! You can keep track of House and Senate races with this weekly newsletter by subscribing here. We want to hear what you think. Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. — Simone Pathé, Bridget Bowman and Stephanie Akin

Harris Lands First Blow on Kavanaugh — But It Only Grazes Him
Senator accuses nominee of remembering conversation but not wanting 'to tell us'

From left: Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Kamala Harris, D-Calif., and Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., confer during the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 11:14 a.m. | ANALYSIS — It took almost 12 hours Wednesday before a Democratic senator, Kamala Harris of California, landed more than a glancing blow on the Teflon chin of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. And even then, she wasn’t able to put President Donald Trump’s second high court pick on the canvas.

The late-night exchange lasted nearly 10 minutes, left Kavanaugh with a dumbfounded facial expression several times, and led Utah Republican Sen. Mike Lee to break in with a helping hand.

‘No One is Above the Law,’ Kavanaugh Tells Senators
Democrats worry Supreme Court nominee would shield Trump

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is sworn in during his confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee. (Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Wednesday said sitting U.S. presidents are subject to all laws, adding a “good judge” is one that is not “swayed by political or public pressure.”

Notably, he hailed a high court decision that forced then-President Richard Nixon to hand over information to federal investigators.

Kavanaugh’s First Stand Was the Blandest Thing Since White Bread
To say even that is an insult to all the plastic-wrapped loaves on supermarket shelves

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh offered bromides so dull on Tuesday, it’s a wonder he didn’t put senators to sleep, Shapiro writes. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — It was Ben Sasse — the conservative Nebraska Republican who makes a fetish out of seeming like the last rational man in the era of Donald Trump — who crystalized the issues facing the Senate as it began the most consequential hearing on a Supreme Court nominee in decades.

Stressing the independence of the judiciary, Sasse said, “This is the last job interview that Brett Kavanaugh will ever have.”

Democratic Delays, 2020 Hopefuls and Don't Forget About the Issues: What We're Watching at Kavanaugh's Hearing
Penn Ave Report — connecting Congress and the White House, at the intersection of politics

Kavanaugh Hearing Erupts in Chaos as Dems Demand Documents
Kamala Harris: ‘We have not been given an opportunity to have a fair hearing’

The first day of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's Senate hearings began in chaos from Democrats on the Senate Judiciary panel as well as protesters opposing his confirmation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Democratic members of the panel overseeing Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination interrupted the hearing and protesters injected chaos as Chairman Charles E. Grassley attempted to start the proceedings.

“We have not been given an opportunity to have a fair hearing,” said Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., a potential 2020 presidential candidate.

McCain Remembered as He Wished: One Who Served Honorably
Members of both parties praised the late Arizona senator

A slightly frayed flag flies at the Capitol in Washington fly at half staff on Sunday morning, after Sen. John McCain died on Saturday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

In September 2017, Sen. John McCain was asked how he would be like to be remembered.

He said he wanted to be remembered as someone who served his country. “I hope we could add, honorably,” he told CNN at the time.

Trump Objections to Senate Election Security Bill Stalled Measure
Scheduled Wednesday markup was delayed indefinitely

Senators want to require verifiable paper trails for ballots. President Donald Trump does not. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump is objecting to the Senate’s effort to help improve election security, citing concerns about imposing federal burdens on state and local governments.

The Rules and Administration Committee abruptly scrapped a Wednesday  markup of bipartisan election security legislation, and there were rumors that the White House might have been at least in part behind the delay.