Amy Klobuchar

Will Trump go negative? Just kidding …
2016 playbook is president’s only path to victory

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019, before boarding Marine One, bound for a Minneapolis political rally. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — There is no need to speculate about President Donald Trump’s strategy for reelection. He plans to — and needs to — destroy his general election opponent.

That’s the only way an incumbent president with a job approval rating in the low 40s and sitting at 40 percent in hypothetical ballot tests can possibly win.

How Klobuchar won where other Democrats haven’t
Three-term Minnesota senator and 2020 hopeful leaned into family’s Iron Range roots

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, seen here at the Iowa State Fair in August, has made her electability her biggest pitch in the Democratic presidential primary. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Amy Klobuchar didn’t miss a beat.

With a two-word retort, she turned what was meant to be an insult into a compliment.

Beware confirmation bias with the 2020 presidential race
What’s the rush to declare the Democratic race a three-person contest?

Yes, it’s early in the 2020 presidential race to be making astute judgments, but certainly the early polling numbers for President Donald Trump are not what one would expect from an incumbent when the economy is healthy, Rothenberg writes.. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

OPINION — “The next debate is do or die for many Democratic hopefuls.”

Andrew Yang “is on fire.”

Wrote the bill, read the bill: Lawmakers dominate Democratic debate
All but three of the candidates on Thursday's debate stage have served in Congress

Democratic presidential hopefuls Former Vice President Joe Biden, center, speaks as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, left, and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren listen during the third Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season hosted by ABC News in partnership with Univision at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas on Thursday. (Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

Although the 10 Democratic presidential candidates in Thursday night’s debate talked about the importance of unity, they spent plenty of time trying to one-up each other with their own congressional records.

The debate stage was stacked with current or former members of Congress: only businessman Andrew Yang, former Housing and Urban Development secretary Julián Castro and South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg of Indiana have never served in Congress.

Democrats question lack of flu vaccines, quarantine procedures for migrant children
Senators, led by Elizabeth Warren, also ask about medical screenings

Senate Democrats want to know more about the decision to not give flu vaccines to migrant children in U.S. custody. (Jinitzail Hernández/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A group of 13 members of the Senate Democratic caucus, led by Massachusetts' Elizabeth Warren, are expressing new concerns about a decision not to provide seasonal flu vaccines to migrants in U.S. detention.

“This dangerous decision not to administer vaccinations for a disease that has already proven fatal to migrant children in CBP’s custody is immoral and irresponsible, placing entire communities at risk of the flu and its associated complications,” the senators wrote to acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan and Health and Human Services Secretary Alexander Azar.

8 Democratic presidential candidates advocate for gun safety in new video
Sanders, Warren and other rivals partner with Giffords on series of ads highlighting gun safety in America

Sen. Elizabeth Warren is one of the eight Democratic presidential candidates who appear in an ad from former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords’ organization’s Gun Safety President ad campaign. (Giffords via YouTube)

Eight of the top Democratic presidential candidates are appearing in a series of videos on gun safety. Former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords’ namesake gun control group, Giffords, launched the video series on Monday.

The candidates in the video series include former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke; California Sen. Kamala Harris; former Vice President Joe Biden; South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg; Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar; New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker; Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Democrats need rural voters to put Iowa in play in 2020
Party hopes to build on midterm gains, but hasn’t settled on the right approach

John Olsen from Des Moines, Iowa, wears a vest with presidential buttons as he listens to former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines on Aug. 8. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

GREENFIELD, Iowa — The sunlight sparkled on Greenfield Lake on a hot Sunday in August as the Democrats passed around a paper bowl, tossing in a few dollars they had in their pockets.

It was a scene that could easily have taken place in a church earlier that day, when parishioners offer donations as baskets are passed through the pews.

Kirsten Gillibrand drops out of Democratic presidential race
New York senator had stressed women’s rights and her appeal to Trump voters in her campaign

New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is ending her presidential campaign. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

New York Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand dropped out of the presidential race Wednesday after failing to make the third round of the Democratic primary debates.

Gillibrand is the fourth presidential candidate to exit the contest in recent days, following former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, and Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton. Just 10 candidates appear to have qualified for the upcoming debate in September due to higher polling and donor thresholds set by the Democratic National Committee.

Personal experience with guns helps shape how 2020 Democrats talk about them
Presidential candidates are united on background checks, but split on buybacks, licensing

Minnesota senator and Democratic presidential hopeful Amy Klobuchar cites her state’s hunting traditions when speaking about her plans to combat gun violence. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For some Democratic presidential candidates, hunting is a family affair. Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan says he hunts ducks “at least once a year, with our oldest son.” Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, who hunts deer, talks about “creating lifelong memories with our kids.”

Family, tradition and personal hunting experience are integral to the way these candidates speak about guns — and how they pitch gun control measures to voters from areas of the country with a strong history of gun ownership.

The GOP is confirming Trump judicial nominees it stalled under Obama
Judges couldn’t get a vote when Obama was president. They’re getting on the bench under Trump

From left, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, Supreme Court Nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch, Vice President Mike Pence, and former Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) in 2017. Gorsuch was confirmed after McConnell had blocked President Barack Obama’s pick, Merrick Garland. (Al Drago/Pool/The New York Times)

At least 10 judicial nominees who couldn’t even get a confirmation vote in the final years of President Barack Obama’s administration ended up on the bench after Donald Trump’s election.  

Those nominees, blocked by Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell and other Republicans while Obama was in the White House, got a second chance. Rather than blocking them under Trump, McConnell sought to speed up the confirmation process. Thanks to the shift in political priorities, Republicans confirmed them with bipartisan support.