Alma Adams

A Census worker’s arrest for child sex assault raises hiring concerns in Congress
Commerce Department report: ‘The Bureau’s background check office is not fully prepared for the 2020 Census’

In this photo provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, tabulators in Washington record the information from the more than 120,000 enumerators who gathered data for the 1940 U.S. Census. (AP Photo/National Archives and Records Administration)

Some members of the North Carolina delegation have called for an investigation into the U.S. Census Bureau’s hiring practices following the arrest of a bureau manager in Charlotte on charges of sexually assaulting a child.

The employee already appeared on the sex offender registry when he was hired by the bureau because of a prior conviction involving a child, Fox 46 reported.

Olympic gold medalist Allyson Felix recalls her ‘most terrifying days’
Felix testifies on maternal health and mortality on Capitol Hill

Allyson Felix, U.S. track and field Olympic gold medalist, testifies Thursday during a House Ways and Means hearing in the Longworth Building. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Allyson Felix, the most decorated female track and field star in American history, was on Capitol Hill on Thursday — not to discuss the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, or preach about fitness, or boast about her gold medals, but to speak to the rising maternal mortality rate in the U.S.

The six-time Olympic gold medalist began her statement humbly: “I’m Camryn’s mom.” The testimony that followed was birthed from her own personal experience. When Felix was 32 weeks pregnant, a prenatal doctor’s appointment and common case of “swollen feet” led to bedrest and the discovery of preeclampsia, which put her and her unborn baby at risk. Doctors then scheduled an emergency C-section.

House Democrats break out their white suits for State of the Union
The party selected the color to harken back to suffragists

First row from left, Reps. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., Sylvia Garcia, D-Texas, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Alma Adams, D-N.C., pose for a group photo Tuesday of House Democrats in the Capitol Visitor Center. They say they are wearing “suffragette white” to the State of the Union address. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats appeared at the Capitol on Tuesday wearing white suits and dresses ahead of the State of the Union. 

The color was selected as a nod to the suffragist movement, according to Rep. Lois Frankel, chair of the Democratic Women’s Working Group.

Clay wants Congressional Black Caucus to snub George H.W. Bush statue
Rep. William Lacy Clay and his father oppose the new sculpture on historically black Hampton University’s campus

From left, Reps. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., Cedric Richmond, D-La., Alma Adams, D-N.C., William Lacy Clay, D-Mo., and John Conyers, D-Mich., speak in front of the painting by Missouri high school student David Pulphus after it was rehung, January 10, 2017. The painting was removed from the Congressional Art Competition display in Cannon tunnel by Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. William Lacy Clay Jr. and his father, a former congressman, are asking the Congressional Black Caucus to follow their lead and oppose a sculpture of George H.W. Bush on the campus of historically black Hampton University.

Last weekend, the Hampton, Virginia university unveiled its new Legacy Park, which commemorates the 41st president along with a host of black leaders including Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass and Barack Obama.

Sexual Assault Survivors in Congress Call for Delay on Kavanaugh Vote
Five House Democrats ask for probe into all allegation against nominee

From left, Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, ranking member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., listen Thursday as Christine Blasey Ford testifies during a hearing on  the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/POOL)

Five Democratic lawmakers, each survivors of sexual assault and domestic abuse, are calling for a delay in the Senate vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

Reps. Alma Adams of North Carolina, Gwen Moore of Wisconsin, Ann McLane Kuster of New Hampshire, Jackie Speier of California and Debbie Dingell of Michigan penned a letter Thursday to President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell asking for the vote on Kavanaugh to be postponed and calling for an investigation into the additional allegations made against him in recent days.

Congress’ Hurricane Caucus Keeps On Growing
Sheila Jackson Lee: ‘You’re answering phones. You’re answering questions. You’re giving hugs’

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee’s district weathered Hurricane Harvey last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In the days after a hurricane, a member of Congress is “an information post, a local comforter, a problem solver,” Sheila Jackson Lee said.

The Texas Democrat knows what her colleagues hit by Hurricane Florence are going through. Her district weathered Hurricane Harvey in 2017.

Do-Nothing Amendments Give Lawmakers Bragging Opportunity About Successes
Provisions have no real-world impact

Rep. Tom O’Halleran, D-Ariz., is among the most vulnerable Democratic incumbents this midterm cycle. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House adopted amendments on a two-bill spending package last week purporting to redirect sums ranging from $100,000 to study the impact of a mineral found to cause cracking in concrete home foundations, to $36 million for “public safety and justice facility construction” at the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

There’s just one catch: the provisions simply give the illusion of moving money around — with no real-world impact on agency funding priorities. The net financial impact of all 14 such amendments considered during debate on the $58.7 billion Interior-Environment and Financial Services measure — out of 87 total floor amendments on the bill — was precisely zero.

Former DC Interns Share How They Got Their Feet in the Door
Meet four interns who entered the political world through programs

Vashti Hinton applied to 30 Hill offices before landing a full-time position working for Rep. Gregory Meeks, D-N.Y. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Capitol Hill interns are often assumed to be college students with a natural political network. They’ve got an “in” in D.C. or they have — a word most people hate — “connections.”

But for the thousands of interns who flock to the Hill and Washington over the summer, who you know isn’t the only path to the nation’s capital. There are a number of programs that help them get a foot in the political door.

Black Women Movers and Shakers on Capitol Hill
Nine senior staffers talk about the challenges they met to get where they are

Jennifer DeCasper is chief of staff to South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

To celebrate Black History Month, nine black women in senior positions on Capitol Hill shared how they got to where they are.

Some careers started because they were in the right place at the right time. One woman packed her car and moved to D.C. to find work, and another simply worked her “butt off.”

Photos of the Week: State of the Union, GOP Retreat Continues After Crash
The week of Jan. 29 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan arrives in the Capitol on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republicans carried on with their annual retreat this week, after member-doctors sprung to action when the Amtrak locomotive pulling GOP lawmakers to their West Virginia destination collided with a garbage truck on Wednesday, killing one of its passengers.

The previous night, President Donald Trump stayed on track during his first State of the Union address in the House chamber.