Al Green

‘Reluctant impeachment’: Will Pelosi ever be swayed to go there?
Democrats understand the speaker’s cautious approach to impeachment but believe she can be convinced

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., leaves a House Democratic Caucus meeting Wednesday, May 22, 2019 in which her members debated whether it’s time to open an impeachment inquiry. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Will Speaker Nancy Pelosi ever come to a point where she is ready to lead her caucus in opening an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump?

The California Democrat hasn’t ruled it out, despite strong signals she wants to avoid the divisive move and let the voters decide in 2020 whether to punish Trump for his alleged misdeeds. 

Here are House Democrats who are pushing for Trump’s impeachment
Pelosi holds special meeting with her caucus to discuss oversight matters and impeachment

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has cautioned her caucus that rushing into starting impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump could derail the party’s agenda in the House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is meeting with her Democratic caucus Wednesday as she tries to tamp down a growing push among some members to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

The party’s caucus is divided. Pelosi has resisted initiating impeachment proceedings, arguing that they could swamp the party’s policy agenda.

Democrats divided over whether it’s time to open impeachment inquiry
Caucus to discuss the matter during a special meeting Wednesday

Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky is among the Democrats who do not think it is quite time to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:50 p.m. | House Democrats are divided over whether they should open an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, with top leaders still hesitant to do so even as more rank-and-file members say it’s time.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi has called a special caucus meeting Wednesday morning to discuss oversight matters, including the impeachment question, several members said.

Impeachment? Democratic Hill aides say no
Respondents to CQ’s Capitol Insiders Survey rejected the idea overwhelmingly

If the views of congressional aides are reflective of their bosses, there’s little appetite for impeaching President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Since the release of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report last month, some Democrats have reiterated, or joined, the calls for impeaching President Donald Trump, on the grounds that he obstructed Mueller’s probe.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, for example, said on May 7 that the only mechanism to hold the president accountable and to ensure that the president is not above the law is for Congress to initiate impeachment proceedings. Texas Rep. Al Green, on April 30, said he’d introduce articles of impeachment, as he did in the last Congress.

Activists urging Congress to impeach Trump arrested in Cannon
About 20 protesters were arrested as they attempted to “occupy” the Cannon rotunda

Protesters with the group By The People hold “Time to impeach” signs Tuesday before being arrested by Capitol Police in the Cannon rotunda. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A group of activists attempted to “occupy” the Cannon rotunda Tuesday morning before approximately 20 people were arrested by Capitol Police.

The protesters were calling for the House to initiate impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

10 images that define the week in Washington
The week of May 6 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Rep. Billy Long, R-Mo., shows off his $45 Trump bills after participating in a press conference on national security outside of the Capitol on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Another week in Washington has come to close. Lawmakers spent the first week of May holding hearings on the fallout of the Mueller report and honoring fallen law enforcement officers. 

At the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue, President Donald Trump’s my-way-or-the-highway negotiating style was on full display this week, John T. Bennett writes. But the president is set to end the week with little gained on some big campaign promises.

Rep. Rashida Tlaib renews calls for impeachment, but Democratic leadership hesitates
The Democratic Caucus will have a conference call on Monday to discuss next steps

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., attends a House Financial Services Committee organizational meeting in Rayburn Building on January 30, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Rashida Tlaib renewed her calls to impeach President Donald Trump on Thursday in light of new revelations about the president’s potentially criminal efforts to impede the special counsel’s investigation into his campaign.

“It’s not only up to Congress to hold Trump accountable, it’s our job to do so,” the progressive first-term congresswoman said in a tweet. 

Trump, Pelosi agree on one thing: No impeachment, but for different reasons
‘I never did anything wrong,’ president tweets, linking economic strength to impeachment decision

President Donald Trump argues about border security with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi as Vice President Mike Pence, second from left, and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer look on. Trump and Pelosi actually agree on something: not impeaching Trump. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump and Speaker Nancy Pelosi actually agree on something. But their shared view that the House should not start impeachment proceedings against him are based on starkly different reasons.

I’m not for impeachment,” the California Democrat said in an eye-opening interview with the Washington Post that was published Monday.

‘Shooting with real bullets,’ Democrats change tune on impeachment vote
Rep. Al Green prepared to force third vote on impeaching Trump but has lost some support

Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., left, said she now agrees with Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., that Democrats should not go down the path of impeaching President Donald Trump after supporting two efforts to bring articles of impeachment to a vote last year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

An intransigent proponent of impeaching President Donald Trump plans to force his Democratic colleagues to go on record on the issue again this year — after twice doing so last Congress. But the vote tally may look a lot different than in 2017 and 2018 when roughly five dozen Democrats wanted to debate and vote on impeachment.

Democrats, then in the minority, were eager for any forum to debate the president’s alleged crimes since Republicans weren’t investigating them. But now that they’re in the majority and have multiple congressional committees probing Trump, most Democrats want to avoid rushing to judgement or action.

House will have to vote on impeaching Trump, regardless of Pelosi’s opposition
Texas Rep. Al Green says he’ll force a vote on impeachment, as he did twice when Democrats were in minority

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, plans to force the House to vote on impeaching President Donald Trump over Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s objections. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s opposition to impeaching President Donald Trump won’t stop a House vote on the issue, as Texas Democratic Rep. Al Green intends to force one again like he twice did when Republicans held the majority.

“I’m going to bring it the floor of the House again,” Green said Tuesday morning on C-SPAN’s “Washington Journal.” He declined to say when he plans to take action, saying, “The acid test is one that does not carry with it a specific date.”