2020

‘We gotta go, the trial started at 1 o’clock!’ — Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Jan. 20, 2020

Capitol workers wind the Ohio Clock in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Reporter’s Notebook: Precedent, the reason Senate rules feel ‘made up’

Niels Lesniewski talks about his deep dive into the 1936 impeachment of a federal judge from Florida. (Graham MacGillivray/CQ Roll Call)

CQ Roll Call reporter Niels Lesniewski took a deep dive into the history of impeachment ahead of the Senate trial for President Donald Trump. He found some pertinent parallels in a 1936 impeachment case of a federal judge from Florida that involved the House adding articles of impeachment after a Senate trial began.

Watch as he takes us through the weird rabbit hole he jumped down for this archived story.

Capitol Ink | Fast Aging Baby New Year

McConnell, Schumer respond to killing of Iranian Quds commander
Senate leaders spar on congressional notification of the Baghdad airstrike

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., walks from his office to the Senate floor ahead of his speech Monday afternoon. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., joined senators from both parties Friday in addressing the recent killing of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani. While the senior senators agreed they would not mourn Soleimani’s death, they differed on process. McConnell pointed to congressional briefings in the coming hours and weeks while Schumer said he received no prior notification about the operation and questioned the president’s authority to significantly increase troop levels.

Walker not running for reelection in House, will consider 2022 Senate bid
North Carolina Republican faced troubles after redistricting, said Trump will support him for Senate

Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., takes the Senate subway in the Capitol on Oct. 16, 2019. Walker announced Monday that he will not seek reelection to the House next year but will consider a Senate bid in 2022. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

North Carolina Republican Rep. Mark Walker announced Monday that he will not run for reelection in the House next year but is considering running for Senate in 2022.

“I believe the best way we can continue to serve the people of North Carolina is as a United States Senator,” Walker said in a statement. “As I have always sought to have serving people supersede our ambition, I will dedicate my full heart and efforts to finishing my term in Congress. After we have secured more conservative policy and Republican electoral victories for North Carolina, we will take a look at the 2022 Senate race and we are thankful to have President [Donald] Trump’s support.”

‘Impeachapalooza 2019’: Congressional Hits and Misses
Week of Nov. 18, 2019

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, arrives to testify before the House Intelligence Committee during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Trump in Longworth Building on Wednesday, November 20, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

If you’re not counted you’re not represented: Census 101
Roll Call Decoder

Protesters hold signs at a rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after their ruling on the census was handed down on June 27. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

How many people will be living in the United States on April 1, 2020?

Watch: Shelby endorses Sessions for return to Senate
“I believe he will be a formidable candidate,” Shelby said

Jeff Sessions and Richard Shelby get off the Senate subway in 2014. Shelby endorsed Sessions for a potential 2020 Senate bid on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Republican Sen. Richard C. Shelby endorsed his former Alabama Senate colleague for an expected 2020 Senate bid. “I believe he will be a formidable candidate,” Shelby said Thursday.

About a year ago, Jeff Sessions was forced out of his role as attorney general by President Donald Trump. Prior to that, Sessions served in the Senate for about two decades. He was first elected in 1996.

Jimmy Carter: I hope there's an age limit' to run for president

Former President Jimmy Carter testifies at a 2009 Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing. (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Averting a government shutdown
CQ Budget, Episode 128

Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., speaks with reporters in the Senate subway on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The House passed a continuing resolution last week to extend current funding through Nov. 21, giving Congress an extra eight weeks to get its work done. The Senate is scheduled to vote on a measure later this week. But there’s more in this resolution than just a simple funding extension.