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Trump threatens to send armed soldiers to U.S.-Mexico border
President cites Mexican troops pulling guns on National Guard troops

President Donald Trump talks to reporters as he leaves the White House earlier this month on a trip to Southern California to visit the U.S.-Mexico border. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump on Wednesday issued a hawkish threat to Mexican law enforcement personnel and drug traffickers, warning them he is sending “ARMED SOLDIERS” to the U.S.-Mexico border.

Trump appears to have been agitated by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s depiction of his White House as a dysfunctional place where top aides defy his orders. Political analysts from both parties have noted when Trump feels in political or legal hot water, he typically returns to an immigration-based message.

Democrats close but still short votes needed to pass $15 minimum wage
Proponents of bill to double existing minimum wage over five years confident they’ll get there

House Education and Labor Chairman Robert C. Scott, D-Va., is confident he can convince enough uncommitted Democrats to support his bill to incrementally increase the federal minimum wage to $15 over five years for it to pass the chamber. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Proponents of a $15 minimum wage are bullish about the prospects of the House passing a bill to incrementally double the current $7.25 federal standard over five years, despite Democrats seemingly being short the votes to do so.

“We’re working to make sure that we have consensus, but we’re going to pass that bill with enough Democratic votes to make sure that it passes out of the House,” House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer told reporters during House Democrats’ retreat in Leesburg, Virginia, earlier this month. 

Will 2020 Democrats condemn the Armenian genocide?
Only four lawmakers running for president have signed on to remembrance resolutions

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., is one of four Democratic presidential candidates who have co-sponsored resolutions recognizing the Armenian genocide. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Whether the slaughter of Armenians by Ottoman Turks in 1915 amounted to a genocide is still a fraught political question for U.S. presidential candidates more than a century later.

The question for now is how many of the growing field of candidates might weigh in on Wednesday for the annual commemoration. April 24, 1915 is generally considered to mark the start of actions that led to the Armenian genocide.

First quarter drug lobbying outpaces other health care sectors
Big spending comes amid bipartisan support for legislation to lower drug prices

Health care trade groups and businesses increased their lobbying efforts during the first quarter of 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Several health care trade groups and businesses upped their lobbying expenditures in the opening stretch of 2019, with the pharmaceutical industry reporting the highest expenditures as lawmakers focus on rising drug prices.

The Pharmaceutical Care Management Association, which represents the pharmacy benefit managers that have emerged as a bogeyman in the drug pricing debate, more than doubled its lobbying expenditures in the first quarter of the year compared to the equivalent period in 2018. So far this year, the group has spent $1.49 million on lobbying, compared to last year’s first quarter sum of $741,557.

Republicans have a post-Trump identity crisis on the horizon
What will it mean to be a Republican once the president leaves office?

Being a Republican has increasingly come to mean being with President Donald Trump, Gonzales writes, but it’s far from clear what the party will look like after he leaves office and if it will turn to Vice President Mike Pence for leadership. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans are enjoying their ride in the White House and basking in the glow of a divided Democratic presidential field, but a monumental identity crisis is looming for the GOP.

Whether you think President Donald Trump won’t be president in two months, two years or six years, Republicans are going to have a difficult time moving on to the next chapter.

Trade, infrastructure, health care issues dominate K Street
Uncertainties in Washington haven’t dampened hopes for legislative deal-making

K Street spending in the first quarter of 2019 shows business interests are still looking for openings to help broker big-scope legislative deals before presidential politics takes hold by 2020. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The renegotiated trade deal with Canada and Mexico, an elusive infrastructure package and debate over prescription drug prices dominated the lobbying agendas of some of the biggest spenders on K Street early this year, setting the legislative stage for the rest of 2019.

The tumult of the Trump administration and the uncertainty of divided party control on Capitol Hill have kept business interests on the defense while also looking for openings to help broker big-scope legislative deals before presidential politics takes hold by 2020.

Trump opposes aides’ testimony on Mueller report, ramping up feud with Democrats
House Judiciary Committee has subpoenaed former White House Counsel Don McGahn

President Donald Trump walks to speak with supporters on Thursday after arriving at Palm Beach International Airport to spend Easter weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort. Trumps says he is opposed to aides testifying before Congress following the public release of the Mueller report. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump said Tuesday he is opposed to current and former White House officials testifying before Congress about special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report.

“There is no reason to go any further, and especially in Congress where it’s very partisan — obviously very partisan,” Trump said in an interview with The Washington Post.

‘I don’t think it’s a growing number’: Pelosi denies uptick in support for impeaching Trump
Speaker acknowledges some caucus support for impeachment but more want to simply follow the investigations

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., says she does not believe support among House Democrats for impeaching the president is growing. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday sought to tamp down on speculation that her caucus is fractured over the question of impeaching President Donald Trump and pushed back on reports that support for such a move is increasing.

“I don’t think there’s big divisions in our caucus,” Pelosi said at the TIME 100 Summit in New York on Tuesday. She was responding to a question about House Democrats’ discussing whether they should move forward with impeachment proceedings against Trump in light of evidence unveiled in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report.

Mnuchin misses Trump tax returns deadline; asks for more time
Noncompliance with Democrats’ request could put Treasury secretary in jeopardy, legal experts say

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says “exposure for the sake of exposure” is not a valid reason for House Democrats seeking the president’s tax returns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 6:12 p.m. | Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Tuesday he will make a determination by May 6 on whether to comply with House Ways and Means Chairman Richard E. Neal’s request for six years of President Donald Trump’s tax returns.

Neal had set a 5 p.m. deadline Tuesday for the administration to comply with his request. The Treasury Department announced shortly after the deadline that Mnuchin had sent a 10-page response to the Massachusetts Democrat’s request.

House Oversight threatens ex-Trump adviser with contempt after skipping deposition
Former White House adviser Carl Kline is accused of threatening a whistleblower

Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., right, speaks as ranking member Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, listens during the House Oversight and Reform Committee markup of a resolution authorizing issuance of subpoenas related to security clearances and the 2020 Census on Tuesday, April 2nd 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Elijah Cummings threatened Tuesday to hold former White House adviser Carl Kline in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena ordering him to testify about his role allegedly covering up wrongdoing in the Trump administration’s White House security clearance process.

President Donald Trump’s White House counsel directed Kline in a letter earlier this week not to comply with the subpoena. Kline did not appear for his scheduled deposition.