vets

Waters Urges More Protests Like Sanders at Restaurant, Others Plead for Civility
White House press secretary was asked to leave Virginia restaurant after protesters chanted DHS director out of another

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., urged supporters to protest Trump administration officials in public and refuse them service at restaurants and other local businesses. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

At least one Democratic lawmaker is encouraging her supporters to rise up in spontaneous protest and refuse service to members of President Donald Trump’s cabinet, the way press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was ousted from a Lexington, Virginia, restaurant last week.

But other Democrats decried the episode, urging their constituents not to discriminate against patrons, even if they disagree with their politics.

Trump Doubles Down on No Due Process for Migrants
But Sen. King says ‘they have a right to establish their claim of asylum’

From left, Democratic Reps. Joe Crowley, Jan Schakowsky, actor John Cusack, Luis Gutierrez, John Lewis, Al Green, Judy Chu, and Pramila Jayapal sit at the entrance to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection in Washington in protest of the Trump administration's separating parents and children at the border. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Monday doubled down on his call for undocumented immigrants who enter the United States illegally to be sent back to their native countries without any due process before an American judge.

Trump first made the claim in a Sunday tweet following his Saturday contention during remarks before the Nevada Republican Party that Democrats want to open the southern border so the violent MS-13 gang can spread “all over our country.”

Spokesman Says Arrington ‘100 Percent’ in House Race Despite Wreck
Candidate for Sanford’s seat has additional surgery Sunday after crash that killed wrong-way driver

South Carolina state Rep. Katie Arrington, shown here after voting on June 12, had additional surgeries on Sunday related to her injuries in a Friday car wreck that killed a wrong-way driver and critically injured a friend who was driving the other car in which Arrington was a passenger (Kathryn Ziesig/The Post And Courier via AP)

A spokesman for South Carolina Rep. Katie Arrington said she is “100 percent” still in the race for Rep. Mark Sanford’s House seat despite a fatal car wreck in which she was injured Friday which will sideline her for a few weeks.

Arrington had two surgeries on Sunday, according to a statement released by her campaign. The first was a follow-up to the initial procedure to remove a portion of her small intestine Friday night. The second was for a spinal fracture.

Flake Confirms He’s Stalling Trump’s Judicial Nominees Over Tariffs
Said Sunday he wants the Senate to respond to president’s trade policy

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., has announced plans to hold up President Donald Trump’s judicial nominations. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Sen. Jeff Flake has gone public with his threat to stall judicial nominations seeking action to rebuff President Donald Trump on tariffs.

It comes more than a week after the Arizona Republican first held up the nomination of Britt Grant to be a judge on the Atlanta-based 11th Circuit Court of Appeals at the Judiciary Committee.

Rouda to Face Rohrabacher After Keirstead Concedes
Two California Democrats were divided by only 126 votes at last count for right to face GOP incumbent

Democrats Harley Rouda, right, and Hans Keirstead participate in the DEMOC PAC’s candidate forum in Irvine, California last month. Rouda edged out Keirstead to face GOP Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in November. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrat Harley Rouda will face California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in November after a long primary ballot count.

Rouda, a real estate developer, edged out his Democratic opponent Hans Keirstead, who conceded the second-place finish in the June 5 primary on Sunday after a weeks-long ballot count.

Sitting NYC Democrats Under Fire From Their Own
Four Democrats are facing spirited primary challenges — a rarity this cycle

New York Democratic Rep. Joseph Crowley is facing a primary challenge for the first time since 2004. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Outsize Democratic energy has been directed at unseating Republicans this election cycle, but in New York City, Democrats are taking aim at their own. Four veteran lawmakers are unloading their campaign war chests to fend off intraparty opponents. 

These Democrats aren’t worried about losing their primaries Tuesday. They say they’re simply taking their races seriously. But it’s a new experience for some incumbents, who have rarely faced contested primaries. 

House GOP ‘Uphill Fight’ on Immigration About More Than Trump
President’s tweets not helping, but Republicans still have major policy divisions

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., leaves the Capitol in the rain after the final vote of the week on Friday. He plans to spend his weekend continuing negotiations over immigration legislation, striving to reach an agreement on changes before a rescheduled vote next week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump is certainly not helping House Republicans by deeming their immigration negotiations a waste of time, but he’s far from the only issue they face in what one GOP leader called an “uphill fight” to pass legislation.

The House Republican Conference is still struggling internally to coalesce around a bill that members from the various GOP factions negotiated in recent weeks, dubbed the compromise bill. Republican leaders had initially scheduled a vote on the measure for Thursday, and then thought about Friday. Ultimately, they decided to push it off into the next week to negotiate further changes

Louise Slaughter’s Legacy Looms Large in New York Primary
Democrat Joe Morelle is the presumptive favorite for the open upstate seat

Democrats in New York’s 25th District will pick their nominee Tuesday to succeed the late Rep. Louise M. Slaughter, center. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

For the first time in three decades, voters in a small corner of upstate New York are about to choose someone new to send to Congress.

The 25th District, which includes Rochester and its suburbs, had appeared set to re-elect Democrat Louise M. Slaughter to her 17th consecutive term in November, until the iconic congresswoman’s unexpected death in March.

Opinion: To Keep Drug Costs Low, Think Competition, Not Price Controls
A robust, competitive market is the best way to promote innovation and reduce prices

If we truly want to reduce drug costs and make life-changing medications accessible to all Americans, we must increase competition among prescription drugs, Hatch writes. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images file photo)

Even in today’s highly partisan environment, there’s one thing nearly all Americans agree on: The soaring cost of prescription drugs is alarming.

In fact, 80 percent of Americans consider the cost of prescription drugs unreasonable. At the same time, a majority of Americans recognize that prescription drugs have improved countless lives. The president’s recently unveiled comprehensive blueprint to lower prescription drug costs has many ideas worthy of exploration. However, if we truly want to reduce costs and make life-changing and life-saving medications accessible to all Americans, we must increase competition among prescription drugs — particularly new drugs that have the ability to cure diseases, but face limited competition.

From a Scream to a Whisper: Rescissions Push Goes Dark
Clock runs out on GOP effort to assuage Trump’s omnibus displeasure

Sen. Richard M. Burr, R-N.C., arrives in the Capitol on May 15. His decisive vote last week effectively drove a final dagger in a rescissions effort the president had sought. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After much sound and fury, President Donald Trump’s push to cut nearly $15 billion in unspent funds sitting in federal coffers ended with a whimper last week.

The House-passed rescissions plan was unceremoniously scuttled in the Senate on Wednesday when Republican Sen. Richard M. Burr of North Carolina cast the decisive vote against a discharge petition to advance the measure. With a 45-day clock expiring Friday — and senators long gone for the weekend — Republicans could no longer take advantage of filibuster protections under the 1974 budget law to advance the measure with a simple majority in the Senate.