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Orientation Disorientation: The Maybe Members Have a Strange Status
Democrat Nate McMurray says he was barred, but organizers say he is welcome

Democrat Nate McMurray says he was barred from new member orientation, but organizers say he’s invited. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Indicted Republican Rep. Chris Collins’ Democratic challenger Nate McMurray says House Republicans barred him from attending new member orientation Wednesday, but organizers say he is welcome to attend. Such is the plight of the so-called maybe members. 

Traditionally, candidates in races that are too close to call days after Election Day are invited to attend the freshman orientation. Earlier this week, Democratic staff for the House Administration Committee said that was the case again this year.

House Republicans Propose Punishments for Indicted Members
Chris Collins, Duncan Hunter cases pushed issue to the fore

House Republicans propose to strip indicted colleagues of committee and leadership roles. (Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call).

Selfies on the Floor: Members-Elect Break the Rules While They Still Can

Members-elect took tons of selfies in the House chamber, breaking the rules before they're bound by them. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Freshman orientation has been full of selfies as the newly elected members of the 116th Congress get to know their classmates and surroundings on Capitol Hill. But many have been breaking a well-known House rule against photos in the House chamber.

At least eight incoming House members posted selfies in the House chamber to their social media accounts on Tuesday. Maybe the newcomers haven’t been briefed on the rules of decorum in the House, or maybe they got a pass during the exciting orientation tours.  

8 House Races, 1 Senate Race Remain Uncalled as California Democrats Surge
Democrats appear poised to pick up two more seats in California after winning pair over the weekend

The Associated Press called the race in California’s 10th District for GOP Rep. Jeff Denham’s challenger Josh Harder Tuesday night, bringing the number of unresolved House races to nine. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Officials have yet to determine the winners in one Senate contest and eight House races — a week and a day after the midterm elections.

If the 2000 presidential race is an indication, the outcome of the Florida Senate race could be weeks away as state election personnel recount votes for Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson. Nelson trailed in the initial tally by less than 15,000 votes to his challenger, GOP Gov. Rick Scott.

On Health Care, Dems Go From Running to Baby Steps
Incremental measures will dominate action on the health law in a largely gridlocked Congress

House Democrats plan to bring administration officials to Capitol Hill to explain what critics call “sabotage” of the law’s insurance exchanges. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The midterm elections all but ended the Republican push to repeal the 2010 law known as Obamacare, but as a defining issue for Democrats in their takeover of the House, health care will likely remain near the top of lawmakers’ policy and political agenda.

Newly emboldened Democrats are expected to not only push legislation through the House, but use their majority control of key committees to press Trump administration officials on the implementation of the health law, Medicaid work requirements, and insurance that does not have to comply with Obamacare rules.

Independents Decided This Election. They’ll Decide the Next One Too
Everything depends on the people in the middle — the ones who don’t get up every day breathing fire

Immigration, a party base issue, couldn’t deliver Republicans the independent votes they needed to push competitive House races over the edge, Winston writes. Above, a man demonstrates in front of the Capitol in September. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — There is a lot still to be learned from the midterm elections as analysts pour over incoming data, but one thing we do know is that this was a terribly divisive election, reflecting a growing disunity that isn’t good for either party or the nation.

Voters know it, too. The 2018 exit polls asked voters whether the country, politically, was becoming more or less divided. By a margin of 76 percent to 9 percent, people opted for “more divided,” an ominous sign that something has to change.

FiscalNote Announces Wendy Martinez Legacy Project
Former FiscalNote chief of staff was killed in random attack in Washington in September

Daniel Hincapie, Wendy Martinez’s fiancé, announces The Wendy Martinez Legacy Project, which will support “women in tech, women in entrepreneurship, and community empowerment through her love of running,” at The Anthem on Tuesday. Also appearing are friends Kristina Moore, left, Patrice Webb and Tim Hwang, CEO of FiscalNote, where Martinez served as chief of staff. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After a knife attack left his fiancée dead, Daniel Hincapie wants to empower Washingtonians to keep on running.

“This is a great city, we love it, and all of us … we’re going to keep running, we’re going to keep going on, we’re going to keep thinking of Washington, D.C., as a great place to live. This is just who we are,” Hincapie said.

A Father Drops Off His Son for Congress’ Freshman Orientation
Andy Levin, who will succeed his father in the House, was one of dozens of new members in Washington to learn the ropes

Members-elect from left, Mikie Sherrill, D-N.J., Colin Allred, D-Texas, and Lauren Underwood, D-Ill., arrive for New Member Orientation at the Courtyard Marriott in Southeast Washington on Nov. 13. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Retiring Rep. Sander M. Levin drove away from the Courtyard Marriott in Southeast Washington, leaving his son on the curb in front of the hotel.

It was a true first day of school moment for Michigan Rep.-elect Andy Levin, who will be succeeding his father. As the Democrat made his way into the lobby around 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, the official orientation for new members of Congress was just getting started.

New Members of Congress Hit the Books in DC
It’s just like college, but with more catering

Newly elected members of the 116th Congress arrive in Washington today for new member orientation. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Freshly elected faces will descend on Washington on Tuesday for the start of their congressional orientation, including a new session on workplace rights on Capitol Hill. If past years are any indication, they’ll be eating tens of thousands of dollars of food.

Lunches, tours and briefings will pack the agenda, and winners from around the country will mix and mingle like freshmen on a college campus. It will be their first taste of life as a member of Congress, from interacting with media to forging relationships with their future colleagues.

Rep. Steve King Called Immigrants ‘Dirt’ in Recorded Conversation
Iowa Republican had previously denied making the comments

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, called immigrants “dirt” in a pre-election meeting with constituents last week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

News outlet The Weekly Standard released an audio recording of Rep. Steve King referring to immigrants from the West Coast as “dirt” during a conversation with constituents before the midterm elections last week.

King, who staved off a challenge from Democrat J.D. Scholten by 3 points last week, had previously denied he made the comments and called for the audio’s release.