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In wild Fox News interview, Trump again shows his obsession with 2016 election
President repeats false assertion about ‘Steele dossier,’ says impeachment is backfiring on Democrats

Then-Democratic presidential nominee and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton debates then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in 2016 in Las Vegas. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

ANALYSIS — For Donald Trump, it may always be 2016.

The president is running for reelection in 2020, but a wild Friday morning television interview showed anew just how laser-focused he remains on things that happened — and that he and right-wing lawmakers and commentators claim went down — three years ago.

Trump comes out swinging, but Fiona Hill fights back in dramatic impeachment finale
Kyiv embassy official says he had ‘never seen anything like’ Sondland cafe call with U.S. president

Fiona Hill, a former National Security Council Russia adviser, testifies before the House Intelligence Committee during a hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump came out swinging Thursday morning, but two witnesses who testified for hours in the impeachment inquiry pulled no punches as they overshadowed the president’s morning attacks.

Testimony by Fiona Hill, a former National Security Council Russia expert, and David Holmes, an official in the U.S. embassy in Kyiv, further undercut several contentions pushed by Trump, GOP lawmakers and the president’s surrogates. Hill, for instance, dismissed a conspiracy theory rejected by American intelligence agencies but espoused by Trump and other Republicans that Ukraine, not Russia, meddled in the 2016 U.S. election.

Trump’s relationships and other takeaways after Gordon Sondland’s testimony
‘The Gordon problem’: Ambassador quips ‘that’s what my wife calls me’ during an odd day in Washington

Gordon Sondland, U.S. ambassador to the European Union, testifies during the House Intelligence Committee hearing on the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Donald Trump stuck to the script Wednesday, one he personally wrote on an Air Force One notepad in black marker.

As the president gestured with his hands as he spoke to reporters, the pad in his left hand tilted toward journalists assembled on the White House’s South Lawn. His movements revealed the notes, writing in large letters with what appeared to be a thick black marker. (A White House official confirmed it was the president’s handwriting on the white page.)

Trump contends Sondland clears him
‘I want nothing. That’s what I want from Ukraine,’ POTUS says he told ambassador

President Donald Trump speaks to reporters at the White House on Oct. 10. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Reading from his own marker-written notes and running an hour behind schedule for a trip to Texas, President Donald Trump contended Wednesday that Gordon Sondland’s testimony proves he did not order a quid pro quo with Ukraine’s new president.

In yet another surreal moment of his presidency, Trump appeared to recite a version of a Sept. 9 phone conversation with Sondland that his ambassador to the EU took while sitting on the outdoor patio of a Kyiv restaurant.

‘I don’t know any of these people’: 3 takeaways as Trump watches impeachment saga
Williams gives VP cover after his spox noted ‘she doesn’t directly report to the vice president’

President Donald Trump talks to the media on the South Lawn upon his return to the White House via Marine One on Nov. 3. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images)

The third day of public impeachment hearings temporarily transformed President Donald Trump into a history professor as he and his surrogates tried to discredit government witnesses and panned House Democrats.

Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who oversees European matters at the National Security Council, told the House Intelligence Committee that Trump’s talk on a July 25 call with Ukraine’s president of his government investigating U.S. Democrats was “inappropriate” and a “partisan play.” He also panned attacks on other witnesses as “callow and cowardly,” appearing to criticize his commander in chief. Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Mike Pence, called that telephone conversation “unusual” because Trump was focused on a domestic political matter.

Taking lead on impeachment legal message, Trump gives GOP cover to defend him
Campaign official says GOP is benefitting from inquiry with voter registration, donation surges

President Donald Trump at a campaign rally at the Target Center in Minneapolis, Minn., on Thursday. His legal argument on impeachment is that he committed no crime. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images)

Senior White House officials and House Republicans are basing their counter-impeachment arguments on House Democrats’ process rather than legal arguments — but President Donald Trump is again doing his own thing and arguing the probe is invalid because, he says, he committed no crimes.

The president has no formal legal training, but that is not stopping him from leading his own legal defense, using tweets and public comments to claim House Democrats have no grounds to impeach him — and the Senate no reason to remove him — because he never outright asked Ukraine’s new president to investigate a leading 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden, in exchange for U.S. aid.

Constituent at AOC town hall claims there’s a British coup to unseat Trump
The New York Democrat stopped her, insisting that the person she interrupted be able to ask his question

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, right, and a constituent, left, disagree on impeachment during Thursday night’s town hall meeting in Queens, New York. (Screenshots of C-SPAN footage)

Freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez was confronted by a constituent Thursday night on her support for pursuing an impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.

The New York Democrat stopped her, insisting that the person she interrupted should be able to ask his question.

Throwback: Clyburn remembers meeting wife

House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., speaks at an April legislative retreat in Leesburg, Va. (File Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

House Majority Whip James Clyburn’s wife passed away Thursday morning at the age of 80. Over the years, the congressman has occasionally talked about their first time meeting … in jail during the civil rights movement. In a 2011 interview with South Carolina Education Television (SCETV), he remembered meeting Emily Clyburn when she brought him half a hamburger to his jail cell after he was arrested for his part in a 1960 student protest in Orangeburg, South Carolina.  He added to the story seven years later in an interview broadcast on C-SPAN, sharing his wife’s perspective on the events that lead up to their first meet.

Trump seeks cover from Fox News as criticism mounts
President quotes ‘Fox & Friends’ to criticize Obama on mass shootings after warning about political division

President Donald Trump makes a statement on the census with Attorney General William P. Barr in the Rose Garden of the White House on Thursday. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | One day after he warned the country about political division and the “perils” of social media, President Donald Trump contradicted himself with a series of tweets criticizing his predecessor and a perceived big-tech nuisance. And he again turned to his favorite cable network for an assist.

The president addressed the country Monday morning in a speech meant to console the families of the victims of two deadly weekend mass murders in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio. Gunmen opened fire in a WalMart in the former and an entertainment district in the latter. The violence has prompted calls for Trump to call on Congress to interrupt its August recess to send him gun-control legislation.

Trump suggests Rep. Omar, other Dems cheered 9/11 attacks and ‘should leave’
‘If you're not happy here, you can leave,’ president says amid backlash over comments criticized as racist

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media prior to his departure from the White House on July 5. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Monday, for the first time in front of television cameras, suggested four freshman House Democratic congresswoman who have harshly criticized him should leave the United States.

Trump, very much in reelection mode during almost every public appearance, suggested the House freshmen congresswoman prefer the al Qaeda terrorist group over the United States and alleged they “hate our country.”