trade

Macron Denounces Nationalistic Wave That Propelled Trump to White House
Post-WWII order is in jeopardy, French president warns U.S. lawmakers

French President Emmanuel Macron, center, arrives to address a joint meeting of Congress on Wednesday, flanked from left by Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif.,and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

French President Emmanuel Macron, addressing a joint meeting of Congress, denounced the wave of nationalistic fervor that helped Donald Trump capture the White House and urged U.S. lawmakers to seek a new and broader deal with Iran.

After spending a day and a half with Trump and first lady Melania Trump that included private meals, cheek kisses, hand-holding and backslapping, the French president broke with his political alter ego on several issues.

Macron Expected to Avoid ‘Netanyahu Approach’ in Joint Meeting
French president takes his pitch for revised Iran deal to Capitol Hill

The flags of France, the United States, and Washington, D.C., fly on Pennsylvania Ave. on Monday, the day French President Emmanuel Macron arrived for an official visit to the U.S. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Iran nuclear deal will be front and center when French President Emmanuel Macron addresses a joint meeting of Congress Wednesday — but he is not expected to strike the same bellicose tone as the last world leader who discussed the pact in the House chamber.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu took his place in the House chamber on March 3, 2015, and delivered a forceful speech that warned House and Senate members that the then-emerging deal would “inevitably” cause a war.

Macron Visit Will Highlight Iran Deal, Trade Differences
‘Iran deal will be atop the list of things Congress is watching,’ expert says

American, French and Washington, D.C., flags fly on Pennsylvania Avenue on Monday ahead of the official state visit of President Emmanuel Macron of France, who arrived later that day. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It was all smiles and handshakes Monday afternoon when French President Emmanuel Macron arrived outside the West Wing. But Republican and Democratic lawmakers are expected to intently watch the youthful European leader’s talks with President Donald Trump.

Macron’s polished black limousine pulled into the White House’s West Wing entrance with a spring breeze perfectly pitching the flags of each country affixed to his hood. When the 40-year-old French president greeted his 71-year-old political alter ego, the personal bond they both often laud was on public display.

Analysis: For Trump, Wins and Losses During Abe Summit
‘The body language on trade was just really startling,’ expert says

President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at a news conference at the former’s West Palm Beach, Fla., resort. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

White House aides set a low bar for their boss ahead of his two-day summit with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe — and President Donald Trump often cleared it with ease. But experts say there were a few stumbles too.

Trump aides made clear they had no “deliverables” in mind ahead of the Tuesday-Wednesday talks, which touched on everything from a new round of trade talks to dealing with North Korea to their respective golf games. That diplomat-speak refers to agreements or other things the White House wants meetings with world leaders to produce.

Trump, Abe Split on Goal for New Trade Talks
Japanese PM wants U.S. return to TPP; Trump wants ‘one-one-one’ pact

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks during a press conference on Wednesday with U.S. President Donald Trump at Mar-a-Lago in West Palm Beach, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe split Wednesday evening on their goals for a new round of trade talks between the longtime allies, exposing a rift in the alliance.

Abe announced the new U.S.-Japanese trade talks during a joint press conference after the first full day of a mini-summit at Trump’s resort in Florida. But Abe broke with Trump by telling reporters he wants those talks to expand the two countries levels of trade and investment in each other’s markets, and the re-entry of the United States in a trade alliance that includes 11 Asian-Pacific countries.

Trump Leaves Open Door to Kim Summit Never Happening
Meeting could happen ‘very soon’ or in ‘early June‘ or not at all, president says

President Trump gave various estimates for when he might meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un - including not at all. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump set wildly opposite expectations in one sentence for his possible summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, including that it could never happen.

He first said his one-on-one meeting with Kim could happen “very soon,” before saying he expects negotiations will allow an “early June” summit to take place. But the president then moved up the possible date to “before that” before backpedaling.

3 Things to Watch as Trump, Abe Try to Rekindle Bromance
U.S. tariffs on Japanese imports 'may well come up,' official says

President Donald Trump greets Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as he arrives at the White House on February 10, 2017. They will meet again next week in Florida (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | When President Donald Trump huddles next week with Shinzo Abe, the summit will mostly cover issues that have irritated the Japanese prime minister.

North Korea and trade relations likely will dominate the leaders’ talks at Trump’s private Mar-a-Lago resort that will span three days next week. Trump and Abe will compare notes on the North’s nuclear weapons and long-range missile programs, and the U.S. president’s planned one-on-one summit with Kim Jong Un. They also, however, will have to cover a number of prickly issues related to Trump’s trade policies and Abe’s worries that his country is drifting out of America’s economic orbit.

Trump Could Flip-Flop on TPP After All
But Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse cautions that president ‘likes to blue-sky a lot’ in meetings

Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., said he was Thursday was pleased with President Trump’s willingness to possibly rejoin the Trans-Pacific Partnership — but he also presented a caveat. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

In what would be another dramatic reversal, President Donald Trump told farm-state lawmakers Thursday he might sign the United States up for the Trans-Pacific Partnership after all.

Just by floating the idea, the Republican president drew the ire of conservatives on social media as he opened the door to joining a trade pact with 11 other Pacific Rim countries that he once dubbed “a continuing rape of our country.” 

Tariffs Could Complicate Key Senate Races
Some Democrats already criticizing GOP opponents over tariffs’ impact

A John Deere tractor sits in a field near Salem, Ind. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The potential for a trade war with China is already complicating some key Senate races ahead of the November midterms, especially for Republicans hoping to expand their majority.

President Donald Trump’s announcement that he would impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports sparked retaliatory threats from China. The country vowed to slap tariffs on top U.S. exports that also come from states with some of the most competitive Senate contests.

Trump’s Top Economist Talks Tariffs, Provides Zuckerberg Fashion Advice
U.S., Chinese officials having ‘conversations,’ says Kudlow

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives for his meeting with Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., in the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday. Zuckerberg is on Capitol Hill to testify before the House and Senate this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

White House chief economic adviser Lawrence Kudlow said Monday “conversations are going on” between U.S. and Chinese officials about how to resolve their ongoing trade tiff, but he declined to say proposed tariffs definitely will be implemented.

The former CNBC host also criticized Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg executive as he prepares to testify before lawmakers in a scandal that has dinged the company’s bottom line and raised congressional concerns about the social media giant’s role in providing data to political firms influencing the 2016 presidential campaign.