trade

‘The Mooch’ is under President Trump's skin amid recession warnings
President dubs former comms director a ‘nut job’ as Fox poll suggests uphill reelection fight

Former White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci says President Trump is "unstable" and too "erratic" for a second term. (Wikimedia Commons)

ANALYSIS — Anthony Scaramucci is under Donald Trump’s skin, hitting a nerve as the president frets about his re-election chances amid economic warning signs.

The former White House communications director was back on CNN Monday morning, delivering another broadside on his former boss just four days after a Trump’s stated favorite news organization, Fox News, released a poll showing him trailing the four leading Democratic presidential hopefuls — including former Vice President Joe Biden by 12 percentage points.

The Iowa State Fair: Our hits, misses and lessons learned
Political Theater, Episode 88

Rep. Cindy Axne, D-Iowa, says a quick hello to her son, Gunnar, as he works at a corn dog booth at the Iowa State Fair on Monday August 12, 2019. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

DES MOINES, Iowa — For all its quaintness and fun, the Iowa State Fair does a pretty good job of approximating politics at the national level, be it questions about electability and charisma or trade and agricultural policy.

“The debate within the party that is happening right now, is happening right in front of me at the Iowa State Fair between these two people,” CQ Roll Call senior politics writer Bridget Bowman says, recounting a conversation between a couple after hearing South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg speak at the Des Moines Register Political Soapbox on Aug. 13. The couple, both of whom told Bridget they were impressed with Buttigieg, were torn between what was more important for a Democratic candidate: offering bold ideas or being more likely to beat President Donald Trump.

Undeterred Trump to tout economy in ‘toss-up’ New Hampshire despite stock tumble
It’s not ‘guaranteed’ every Clinton state will remain blue in 2020, analyst says

President Donald Trump greets Blake Marnell of San Diego during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pa., on May 20. He will hold another rally Thursday night in New Hampshire. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A White House official grimaced slightly Wednesday as a cable news chyron showed stocks plummeting, potentially undercutting President Donald Trump’s Thursday plans to say his stewardship of a strong economy should help earn him a second term.

Trump will make another campaign-trail pitch to voters Thursday evening in what his aides see as a likely 2020 battleground state that could be a photo finish next November: New Hampshire.

Trump reprises his pitch as the only savior for a Rust Belt battleground
Environmental groups call Pennsylvania facility he visited part of a ‘cancer alley’

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pennsylvania on May 20. He was back in the state, his 11th visit in two years, on Tuesday. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump interrupted his summer vacation Tuesday to again court Rust Belt voters that helped deliver him the White House, espousing false statements and bold promises as he seeks a second term.

“The political class in Washington gutted … your factories,” Trump told workers at a new Shell-owned petrochemical plant in Beaver County, along the border with Ohio, another perennial swing state he also won in 2016. Trump also blamed other countries for American industrial decline, drawing cheers when he told the audience “they have been screwing us for years.”

After years of promises, Trump again sounds dire about China trade pact
‘Joe Biden is not playing with a full deck,’ POTUS alleges of Dem front-runner

President Donald Trump stops to briefly talk with journalists as he tours his “Made In America” product showcase at the White House in July. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images file photo)

President Donald Trump on Friday did not rule out canceling planned trade talks next month with Chinese officials, saying he is not yet ready to make a deal with the Asian economic powerhouse.

He also announced the United States is cutting all ties to Huawei, the giant Chinese telecommunications company that Beijing considers one of its industrial champions but the Trump administration contends is a national security threat. Trump left open the possibility of rebuilding that link if his team can strike a deal with China.

Top Trump economic adviser sees ‘no signs’ of recession amid trade war
Lawrence Kudlow says China has taken more hits than United States

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on May 6 in New York City. Global and U.S. markets dipped Monday amid U.S.-China trade and currency tensions. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Lawrence Kudlow, President Donald Trump’s chief economic adviser, predicted Tuesday that “calmer heads” will prevail in an escalating trade confrontation between the U.S. and China even as he offered few concrete signposts for progress.

The former CNBC analyst’s comments come as U.S. and global markets are slumping over worries that the world’s two biggest economies could trigger a recession with their trade war. Major U.S. markets dropped by at least 3 percent Monday.

After Dayton and El Paso killings, here are 3 things Trump could call for
President could endorse House-passed bill or call for quick vote on Manchin-Toomey

President Donald Trump stops to briefly talk with journalists as he tours his 'Made In America' product showcase at the White House on July 15. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is calling for Congress to pass “strong” legislation on firearms background checks following deadly weekend shootings in Ohio and Texas, but just what he wants lawmakers to send him remains vague.

He even used a pair of Monday morning tweets, posted hours before he is slated to address the country at 10 a.m., to address the latest mass shootings during his tenure. The suspect in Saturday’s El Paso shooting posted a manifesto that echoed Trump’s previous statements about an “invasion” of the United States by undocumented migrants from Central and South America.

Here’s the beef: Trump formally announces trade pact with European countries
EU will purchase more American beef after U.S. president rattled markets with new China tariffs

Roger Meirick looks over beef and hogs sides hanging in his cooler awaiting processing at Elma Locker & Grocery on July 25, 2018, in Elma, Iowa. President Donald Trump on Friday will announce the EU is buying more American beef. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Updated 2:15 p.m. | President Trump on Friday formally announced an agreement with the European Union under which countries in the bloc will purchase additional amounts of American beef, according to a source with knowledge of the situation.

The deal, largely negotiated by U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and other administration officials, was made possible when Australia and other beef-producing countries renegotiated their agreements with the EU. Under it, the U.S. beef industry will have access to nearly 80 percent of the EU’s yearly quota on hormone-free beef over seven years, European officials announced in July.

Ohio, Kentucky GOP officials stand by Trump at rally after attacks on ‘squad,’ Cummings
President promises Kentucky Gov. Bevin a rally for his reelection effort

President Donald Trump arrives for a campaign rally in Montoursville, Pa., on May 20. He was back on the trail Thursday for a rally in Cincinnati in the swing state of Ohio. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Several top Ohio Republican officials chose to stand with Donald Trump on Thursday rather than put some distance between their political fortunes and the president’s recent racist attacks on minority lawmakers and a major mid-Atlantic city with a majority black population.

Trump was on a rally stage, this time in Cincinnati, for the first time since Greenville, North Carolina, on July 18, when a mostly white crowd chanted “Send her back,” referring to Somali-born Minnesota Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar.

South Lawn Tales: Trump won’t urge Ohio crowd to avoid ‘send her back’ chant
President ‘not concerned’ on China tariff effects

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media prior to his departure from the White House on July 5. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

After U.S. stock markets dipped on the news he is escalating his trade war with China, President Donald Trump claimed he is unfazed by the tumble. And he appeared unconcerned that a waiting campaign rally crowd might repeat a racist chant he claims to oppose.

“I’m not concerned about that at all,” he said of the markets’ drop. “I kind of expected that ... because people don’t really understand what’s going on.” And on the ”send her back!” chant that a North Carolina crowd broke into last month about Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., Trump said he doubts he could stop his supporters if they all want to send that message.