state-of-pay

Trump Signals Defeat on Wall Demand as Christmas Crisis Deadline Nears
Democrats ‘fight to the death’ to block barrier project, president gripes

President Donald Trump argues about border security with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer , right, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi as Vice President Mike Pence listens in the Oval Office last week. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump signaled defeat Wednesday on his threat to shut down nearly half the federal government over his border wall funding demand, possibly pulling the country back from the brink of a Christmas crisis.

His morning tweet and spokeswoman’s comments Tuesday marked another abrupt reversal for the 45th president, who last week roared at the top two congressional Democrats that he would “take the mantle” and shut down parts of the government unless they gave him $5 billion for his border barrier.

Party Pay Gap: House Democrats Spend More On Staff Than GOP
37 of the 50 biggest spenders on aides' paychecks are Democrats

A Roll Call analysis shows that the average Democratic House member spends about $55,000 more in annual staff salaries than the average Republican. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As House lawmakers appeal to working class voters’ paychecks this election cycle, Democratic congressmen may have the edge with the workers closest to them — their aides.  

Democratic House members are spending more on staff than Republicans by about $150 per day, according to a Roll Call analysis of current voting members using House disbursement data made available by the Sunlight Foundation.  

Ep. 2: Going Broke Working for Congress
The Cloakroom

Staffer Raise Might Pay for Daily Coffee
Roll Call analysis shows stagnant salaries lag far behind costs

An aide tends the door to a meeting of the House Republican Conference in the Capitol in December. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House lawmakers are intent on giving staff members a raise in 2017, concerned that low pay and long hours are contributing to turnover and congressional brain drain.  

But the money won't go very far, according to a Roll Call analysis.