polling

Poll: Nearly Half of Millennials Unsatisfied With Trump
Most think country is headed in wrong direction or are unsure

Immigration rights demonstrators prepare to march from the White House to the Trump Hotel and the Justice Department to oppose President Trump's decision to end the DACA program for “dreamers” on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A new poll shows nearly a majority of millennials disapprove of President Donald Trump and many are dissatisfied with the direction of the United States.

A poll titled the 2017 Millennial Impact Report surveyed 3,000 Millennials between the ages of 18 and 37. It showed two-thirds of millennials voted in 2016, half of them for Hillary Clinton.

Half of New Jersey Voters Don’t Think Menendez Should Be Re-Elected’
Only 20 percent said he deserves to be re-elected in Quinnipiac Poll

Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., leaves the Senate Democrats' weekly policy lunch in the Capitol on Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez is in the legal fight of his life. And if he runs for re-election in 2018, he may be in for his toughest political fight, too. 

Half of New Jersey voters said the state’s senior Democratic senator does not deserve to be re-elected next year, according to a Quinnipiac Poll released Thursday.

Trump Backs Democrats’ Debt Limit Proposal Against GOP Urging
Some Republicans shocked by Trump’s decision, few critical

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at a news conference Wednesday in which he announced the deal struck by President Donald Trump and Democratic leaders on the debt ceiling. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“Oh, boy.”

That was House Republican Conference Chairwoman Cathy McMorris Rodger’s reaction when she heard President Donald Trump backed the Democrats’ request for a three-month debt limit extension, against his own party leadership’s urging.

7 Ways Trump’s Arizona Speech Complicates Congress’ Fall Agenda
President threatens a shutdown, criticizes senators and their chamber’s rules

President Donald and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, pictured shaking hands after Trump's address to Congress in February, are at odds over willingness to shutdown the government and change the Senate's filibuster rules. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Short on legislative accomplishments so far in his tenure, President Donald Trump went out of his way to complicate Congress’ fall legislative agenda during a campaign-style rally in Phoenix, Arizona, on Tuesday.

Here are seven ways in just that one speech that Trump said things that don’t bode well for his ability to work with Congress:

Poll: Majority Disapprove of Trump in Rust Belt States That Helped Elect Him
But support stays strong among those who supported him last year

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence held a “Make America Great Again Rally” in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, to celebrate their first 100 days in office. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

A new poll shows a majority in three Rust Belt states that helped propel Donald Trump to the White House disapprove of the job he’s doing.

The Marist/NBC News poll released Monday found 55 percent of residents in Michigan disapprove of Trump’s job performance while 36 percent said they approve. In Pennsylvania, 52 percent say they disapprove while 33 percent approve. And in Wisconsin, Trump’s disapproval rate was at 56 while approval was 33.

Poll: Majority of Americans Say Trump’s Charlottesville Response ‘Not Strong Enough’
Two-thirds of respondents want a domestic terrorism investigation

A majority of Americans see President Donald Trump’s response to the racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., as inadequate. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A majority of Americans in a new poll say President Donald Trump’s response to the violence that broke out a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia was “not strong enough.”

Fifty-two percent of respondents in the NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll said Trump’s response should have been stronger, while 27 percent said it was strong enough.

Trump Approval Rating Dips to Lowest Point of Presidency
Poll shows drop in support for president among Republicans from June to August

President Donald Trump's approval ratings among Republicans fell from 91 percent in June to 79 percent in a poll released Wednesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s approval rating has sunk to its lowest point since he took office, with only 35 percent of Americans saying they viewed the job he’s done favorably, according to a poll released Wednesday.

The new Marist poll found that 55 percent disapprove of Trump after seven months on the job.

‘Kid Rock’ May Be Ineligible for Michigan Ballot
Elections bureau would decide whether Robert Ritchie can use stage name

A truck with a Kid Rock for Senate decal was seen on a Virginia highway earlier this month. (Bridget Bowman/CQ Roll Call)

Robert Ritchie may end up challenging Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow in Michigan next year, but his stage name, Kid Rock, may not be allowed to appear on the ballot.

Kid Rock is a household name to Americans under the age of 50, and voters might be attracted to vote for him, as a middle finger to the political establishment. But it’s not immediately clear whether his famous stage name would appear on the ballot or if he’d be required to run under his less-known given name. 

Poll: 78 Percent of Utahns Want Hatch to Retire

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, initially said after his 2012 re-election that he would not run again but is reconsidering that decision. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A new poll shows an overwhelming majority of Utahns want Republican Sen. Orrin Hatchto retire after his current term ends in 2019.

The poll was conducted by the Salt Lake Tribune and the University of Utah’s Hinckley Institute of Politics.

White House Talks Tax Outreach, but Senators Guarded
Legislative director outlines ambitious timetable

White House legislative affairs director Marc Short, left, here with Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso last week, has hopes for a bipartisan tax overhaul effort. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll)

The White House sees Democrats up for re-election in states President Donald Trump won as possible partners in their effort to overhaul the tax code, but Senate Republicans appear less optimistic about the chances of a bipartisan bill.

White House legislative director Marc Short said Monday the White House is not wed to using the often partisan reconciliation process to advance a tax overhaul, though senators were hesitant to rule out that procedural tool.