podcasts

Mueller report’s second act: congressional scrutiny
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 149

Pages of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 election, which was printed out by House Judiciary staffers on Thursday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

CQ legal affairs reporter Todd Ruger says House Democrats now have plenty of leads from special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s report to investigate, especially as to whether President Donald Trump sought to obstruct justice.

When Fritz Hollings ‘made the turn’ as a Southern politician
Political Theater Podcast, Episode 66

Ernest "Fritz" Hollings, then-governor of South Carolina, campaigns with John Kennedy during the 1960 presidential campaign and helped JFK win South Carolina and six other southern states. Before he left office, Hollings would reverse himself on segregation and call for integration. He went on to serve in the Senate from 1966 until 2005. (CQ Roll Call file photo).

Before the late Sen. Ernest “Fritz” Hollings was elected to what would become a distinguished congressional career, the South Carolina Democrat reversed himself on the defining issue in Southern politics: segregation. 

Running for governor in 1958, Hollings opposed integration, a keystone battle in the wake of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision desegregating public schools. But by the end of his term, he said it was time for the South to change, taking a step out of line with many of his Democratic colleagues in the region. 

Progressive power play: Pentagon-level spending for nondefense programs
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 107

Rep. Mark Pocan, D- Wis., who co-chairs the Congressional Progressive Caucus, wants to open the conversation on boosting nondefense spending.(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Assessing the new tax law as April 15 arrives
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 148

Internal Revenue Service building in Washington (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

 

Why ‘Queer Eye’ stormed Capitol Hill
Political Theater Podcast, Episode 65

Jonathan Van Ness from the Netflix series ‘Queer Eye,’ takes a selfie with a fan in the Capitol after meeting with Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., on Thursday, April 4, 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Washington might be Hollywood for ugly people, but every once in a while Hollywood pretties the place up. That was certainly the case when the cast of “Queer Eye” came to the Capitol to advocate for the Equality Act, to the delight of many staffers, members and tourists. Jennifer Shutt discusses how the celebrity advocates used their powers for policy purposes. 

Grassley sees chance to pass infrastructure, drug price legislation
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 106

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, speaks with reporters as he arrives for the Senate Republicans' lunch in the Capitol. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

How Congress helps companies hire foreign workers over Americans
CQ on Congress podcast, Episode 147

Setting sun hits the U.S. Capitol dome. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Dear senators: More conflict please

Maybe a little MORE conflict is what the Senate needs to get out of its funk. (Laura Patterson/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate pushed the nuclear option, again, to change its rules so judicial and executive nominees are subject to less debate. With a debate that featured Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell delivering such eloquent bon mots as “He started it!” at Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, it’s fair to ask what it will take to restore the chamber to a place that looks like it’s populated with adults. 

“Ironically, I think it’s going to take more conflict,” says James Wallner, a senior fellow at the R Street Institute, former Senate aide and all-around procedural badass.

Why we should care that the Senate will debate less
Political Theater Podcast, Episode 64

The Senate changed its rules, again, and the result will be less debate on judicial and executive nominees. The result could have ramifications for civil discourse. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Divided Democrats may forgo a budget resolution
CQ Budget Podcast, Episode 105

Democrats in the House may stall on a next step for President Donald Trump's 2020 budget proposal. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Budget Committee may punt on a fiscal 2020 budget resolution to avoid exposing Democratic caucus fissures over tax and spending policy. But an effort to reach a deal to raise spending limits for the coming fiscal year could prove just as dicey, as Lindsey McPherson explains.